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Books reviewed on Nature (100 entries from 2019 onwards) and Science
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[
{
"title": "How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need",
"author": "Bill Gates",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/02/09/how-to-avoid-a-climate-disaster/"
}
],
"description": "In this urgent, authoritative book, Bill Gates sets out a wide-ranging, practical - and accessible - plan for how the world can get to zero greenhouse gas emissions in time to avoid a climate catastrophe. Bill Gates has spent a decade investigating the causes and effects of climate change. With the help of experts in the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, political science, and finance, he has focused on what must be done in order to stop the planet's slide toward certain environmental disaster. In this book, he not only explains why we need to work toward net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases, but also details what we need to do to achieve this profoundly important goal. He gives us a clear-eyed description of the challenges we face. Drawing on his understanding of innovation and what it takes to get new ideas into the market, he describes the areas in which technology is already helping to reduce emissions, where and how the current technology can be made to function more effectively, where breakthrough technologies are needed, and who is working on these essential innovations. Finally, he lays out a concrete, practical plan for achieving the goal of zero emissions-suggesting not only policies that governments should adopt, but what we as individuals can do to keep our government, our employers, and ourselves accountable in this crucial enterprise. As Bill Gates makes clear, achieving zero emissions will not be simple or easy to do, but if we follow the plan he sets out here, it is a goal firmly within our reach.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=6Z6zDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780241448328",
"pub_date": "2021-02-16",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "When Brains Dream: Exploring the Science and Mystery of Sleep",
"author": "Antonio Zadra",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/02/08/when-brains-dream/"
}
],
"description": "A comprehensive, eye-opening exploration of what dreams are, where they come from, what they mean, and why we have them. Questions on the origins and meaning of dreams are as old as humankind, and as confounding and exciting today as when nineteenth-century scientists first attempted to unravel them. Why do we dream? Do dreams hold psychological meaning or are they merely the reflection of random brain activity? What purpose do dreams serve? When Brains Dream addresses these core questions about dreams while illuminating the most up-to-date science in the field. Written by two world-renowned sleep and dream researchers, it debunks common myths?that we only dream in REM sleep, for example—while acknowledging the mysteries that persist around both the science and experience of dreaming. Antonio Zadra and Robert Stickgold bring together state-of-the-art neuroscientific ideas and findings to propose a new and innovative model of dream function called NEXTUP—Network Exploration to Understand Possibilities. By detailing this model’s workings, they help readers understand key features of several types of dreams, from prophetic dreams to nightmares and lucid dreams. When Brains Dream reveals recent discoveries about the sleeping brain and the many ways in which dreams are psychologically, and neurologically, meaningful experiences; explores a host of dream-related disorders; and explains how dreams can facilitate creativity and be a source of personal insight. Making an eloquent and engaging case for why the human brain needs to dream, When Brains Dream offers compelling answers to age-old questions about the mysteries of sleep.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=ADPxDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781324002840",
"pub_date": "2021-01-12",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "Narrative in the Age of the Genome: Genetic Worlds",
"author": "Lara Choksey",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/02/04/narrative-in-the-age-of-the-genome/"
}
],
"description": "This book is available as open access through the Bloomsbury Open Access programme and is available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. It is funded by the Wellcome Trust. Genetic science has had a profound impact on our understanding of what it means to be human and our links to the world we inhabit. This book considers the impact of these ideas across a range of literary forms, cultural practices, and political imaginaries, and argues that new descriptions of biological value introduced through practices of genomic sequencing from the late 1970s registered a broader crisis of narrative form. Examining a wide range of texts by Doris Lessing, Samuel Delany, Boris and Arkady Strugatsky, Kir Bulychev, Kazuo Ishiguro, Saidiya Hartman, Yaa Gyasi, Svetlana Alexievich, and Jeff VanderMeer, Narrative in the Age of the Genome casts new light on some of the most important issues of our time: from racial, sexual and gender identities to neoliberal economics and environmental crisis.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=S3ufzQEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "1350102547",
"pub_date": "2021-02-11",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth",
"author": "Avi Loeb",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/02/01/extraterrestrial/"
}
],
"description": "Harvard's top astronomer lays out his controversial theory that our solar system was recently visited by advanced alien technology from a distant star",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=s5nSDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780358278146",
"pub_date": "2021",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "Four Lost Cities: A Secret History of the Urban Age",
"author": "Annalee Newitz",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/01/28/four-lost-cities/"
}
],
"description": "One of Apple's Most Anticipated Books of Winter 2021 A quest to explore some of the most spectacular ancient cities in human history—and figure out why people abandoned them. In Four Lost Cities, acclaimed science journalist Annalee Newitz takes readers on an entertaining and mind-bending adventure into the deep history of urban life. Investigating across the centuries and around the world, Newitz explores the rise and fall of four ancient cities, each the center of a sophisticated civilization: the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in Central Turkey, the Roman vacation town of Pompeii on Italy’s southern coast, the medieval megacity of Angkor in Cambodia, and the indigenous metropolis Cahokia, which stood beside the Mississippi River where East St. Louis is today. Newitz travels to all four sites and investigates the cutting-edge research in archaeology, revealing the mix of environmental changes and political turmoil that doomed these ancient settlements. Tracing the early development of urban planning, Newitz also introduces us to the often anonymous workers—slaves, women, immigrants, and manual laborers—who built these cities and created monuments that lasted millennia. Four Lost Cities is a journey into the forgotten past, but, foreseeing a future in which the majority of people on Earth will be living in cities, it may also reveal something of our own fate.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=l6K6DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780393652673",
"pub_date": "2021-02-02",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "This is the Voice",
"author": "John Colapinto",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/01/25/this-is-the-voice/"
}
],
"description": "A New York Times bestselling writer explores what our unique sonic signature reveals about our species, our culture, and each one of us. Finally, a vital topic that has never had its own book gets its due. There’s no shortage of books about public speaking or language or song. But until now, there has been no book about the miracle that underlies them all—the human voice itself. And there are few writers who could take on this surprisingly vast topic with more artistry and expertise than John Colapinto. Beginning with the novel—and compelling—argument that our ability to speak is what made us the planet’s dominant species, he guides us from the voice’s beginnings in lungfish millions of years ago to its culmination in the talent of Pavoratti, Martin Luther King Jr., and Beyoncé—and each of us, every day. Along the way, he shows us why the voice is the most efficient, effective means of communication ever devised: it works in all directions, in all weathers, even in the dark, and it can be calibrated to reach one other person or thousands. He reveals why speech is the single most complex and intricate activity humans can perform. He travels up the Amazon to meet the Piraha, a reclusive tribe whose singular language, more musical than any other, can help us hear how melodic principles underpin every word we utter. He heads up to Harvard to see how professional voices are helped and healed, and he ventures out on the campaign trail to see how demagogues wield their voices as weapons. As far-reaching as this book is, much of the delight of reading it lies in how intimate it feels. Everything Colapinto tells us can be tested by our own lungs and mouths and ears and brains. He shows us that, for those who pay attention, the voice is an eloquent means of communicating not only what the speaker means, but also their mood, sexual preference, age, income, even psychological and physical illness. It overstates the case only slightly to say that anyone who talks, or sings, or listens will find a rich trove of thrills in This Is the Voice.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=BCnODwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781982128760",
"pub_date": "2021-01-26",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women—and Women to Medicine",
"author": "Janice P. Nimura",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/01/19/the-doctors-blackwell/"
},
{
"source": "Nature",
"url": "https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-00020-3"
}
],
"description": "One of Apple's Most Anticipated Books of Winter 2021 \"Janice P. Nimura has resurrected Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell in all their feisty, thrilling, trailblazing splendor.\" —Stacy Schiff Elizabeth Blackwell believed from an early age that she was destined for a mission beyond the scope of \"ordinary\" womanhood. Though the world at first recoiled at the notion of a woman studying medicine, her intelligence and intensity ultimately won her the acceptance of the male medical establishment. In 1849, she became the first woman in America to receive an M.D. She was soon joined in her iconic achievement by her younger sister, Emily, who was actually the more brilliant physician. Exploring the sisters’ allies, enemies, and enduring partnership, Janice P. Nimura presents a story of trial and triumph. Together, the Blackwells founded the New York Infirmary for Indigent Women and Children, the first hospital staffed entirely by women. Both sisters were tenacious and visionary, but their convictions did not always align with the emergence of women’s rights—or with each other. From Bristol, Paris, and Edinburgh to the rising cities of antebellum America, this richly researched new biography celebrates two complicated pioneers who exploded the limits of possibility for women in medicine. As Elizabeth herself predicted, \"a hundred years hence, women will not be what they are now.\"",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=Wy3xDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780393635553",
"pub_date": "2021-01-19",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "A Most Interesting Problem: What Darwin's Descent of Man Got Right and Wrong About Human Evolution",
"author": "Jeremy DeSilva",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/01/18/a-most-interesting-problem/"
}
],
"description": "\"In 1859, Charles Darwin proposed a mechanism for biological evolution in his most famous work, On the Origin of Species. However, Origin makes little mention of humans. Despite this, Darwin thought deeply about humans and in 1871 published The Descent of Man, his influential and controversial book in which he applied evolutionary theory to humans and detailed his theory of sexual selection. February 2021 will mark the 150th anniversay of it's publication. In A Most Interesting Problem, twelve leading anthropologists, biologists, and journalists revisit The Descent. Following the same organization as the first edition of Descent - less the large section on sexual selection -- each author reviews what Darwin wrote in Descent, comparing his words to what we now know now. There are chapters on evidence for human evolution, our place in the family tree, the origins of civilization, human races, intelligence, and sex differences. An introduction by Darwin biolographer and historian Janet Browne provides context for Descent and a conclusion by Science magazine journalist Ann Gibbons looks to the future of the study of human evolution. All the chapters are written with a broad audience in mind. Ultimately, readers learn that Darwin was remarkably prophetic in some of his predictions, such as that the earliest human fossils would be discovered in Africa. But he was wrong in other areas, particularly in regards to variations between the sexes and races. Thus, A Most Interesting Problem is not so much a celebration of Darwin as it is a tribute to how science works, how scientific ideas are tested, and the role of evidence in helping structure narratives of human origins. The reader is left with a view of how far we have come in our quest for understanding human origins, biological variation, behavior, and evolution\"--",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=XobxDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780691191140",
"pub_date": "2021-01-12",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "The New Climate War: The Fight to Take Back Our Planet",
"author": "Michael E. Mann",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/01/12/the-new-climate-war/"
}
],
"description": "A renowned climate scientist shows how fossil fuel companies have waged a thirty-year campaign to deflect blame and responsibility and delay action on climate change, and offers a battle plan for how we can save the planet. Recycle. Fly less. Eat less meat. These are some of the ways that we've been told can slow climate change. But the inordinate emphasis on individual behavior is the result of a marketing campaign that has succeeded in placing the responsibility for fixing climate change squarely on the shoulders of individuals. Fossil fuel companies have followed the example of other industries deflecting blame (think \"guns don't kill people, people kill people\") or greenwashing (think of the beverage industry's \"Crying Indian\" commercials of the 1970s). Meanwhile, they've blocked efforts to regulate or price carbon emissions, run PR campaigns aimed at discrediting viable alternatives, and have abdicated their responsibility in fixing the problem they've created. The result has been disastrous for our planet. In The New Climate War, Mann argues that all is not lost. He draws the battle lines between the people and the polluters-fossil fuel companies, right-wing plutocrats, and petrostates. And he outlines a plan for forcing our governments and corporations to wake up and make real change, including: a common-sense, attainable approach to carbon pricing- and a revision of the well-intentioned but flawed currently proposed version of the Green New Deal; allowing renewable energy to compete fairly against fossil fuels debunking the false narratives and arguments that have worked their way into the climate debate and driven a wedge between even those who support climate change solutions combatting climate doomism and despair-mongering With immensely powerful vested interests aligned in defense of the fossil fuel status quo, the societal tipping point won't happen without the active participation of citizens everywhere aiding in the collective push forward. This book will reach, inform, and enable citizens everywhere to join this battle for our planet.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=uUTlDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781541758223",
"pub_date": "2021-01-12",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "Subprime Attention Crisis: Advertising and the Time Bomb at the Heart of the Internet",
"author": "Tim Hwang",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2021/01/11/subprime-attention-crisis/"
}
],
"description": "From FSGO x Logic: a revealing examination of digital advertising and the internet's precarious foundation In Subprime Attention Crisis, Tim Hwang investigates the way big tech financializes attention. In the process, he shows us how digital advertising—the beating heart of the internet—is at risk of collapsing, and that its potential demise bears an uncanny resemblance to the housing crisis of 2008. From the unreliability of advertising numbers and the unregulated automation of advertising bidding wars, to the simple fact that online ads mostly fail to work, Hwang demonstrates that while consumers’ attention has never been more prized, the true value of that attention itself—much like subprime mortgages—is wildly misrepresented. And if online advertising goes belly-up, the internet—and its free services—will suddenly be accessible only to those who can afford it. Deeply researched, convincing, and alarming, Subprime Attention Crisis will change the way you look at the internet, and its precarious future. FSG Originals × Logic dissects the way technology functions in everyday lives. The titans of Silicon Valley, for all their utopian imaginings, never really had our best interests at heart: recent threats to democracy, truth, privacy, and safety, as a result of tech’s reckless pursuit of progress, have shown as much. We present an alternate story, one that delights in capturing technology in all its contradictions and innovation, across borders and socioeconomic divisions, from history through the future, beyond platitudes and PR hype, and past doom and gloom. Our collaboration features four brief but provocative forays into the tech industry’s many worlds, and aspires to incite fresh conversations about technology focused on nuanced and accessible explorations of the emerging tools that reorganize and redefine life today.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=iyPQDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780374721244",
"pub_date": "2020-10-13",
"pub_year": "2020"
},
{
"title": "Death on Earth: Adventures in Evolution and Mortality",
"author": "Jules Howard",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/06/03/death-on-earth/"
}
],
"description": "There is nothing more life-affirming than understanding death in all its forms. Natural selection depends on death; little would evolve without it. Every animal on Earth is shaped by its presence and fashioned by its spectre. We are all survivors of starvation, drought, volcanic eruptions, meteorites, plagues, parasites, predators, freak weather events, tussles and scraps, and our bodies are shaped by these ancient events. Some animals live for just a few hours as adults, others prefer to kill themselves rather than live unnecessarily for longer than they are needed, and there are a number of animals that can live for centuries. There are parasites that drive their hosts to die awful deaths, and parasites that manipulate their hosts to live longer, healthier lives. There is death in life. Amongst all of this, there is us, the upright ape; perhaps the first animal in the history of the universe fully conscious that death really is going to happen to us all in the end. With a narrative featuring a fish with a fake eye, the oldest animal in the world, the immortal jellyfish and some of the world's top death-investigating biologists, Death on Earth explores the never-ending cycle of death and the impact death has on the living, and muses on how evolution and death affect us every single day. Why are we so weird about death? Where does this fear come from? Why are we so afraid of ageing? And how might knowledge of ageing in other animals help us live better lives, free of the diseases of old age?",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=icDCCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Death",
"Evolution"
],
"isbn_13": "9781472915108",
"pub_date": "2016-03-10",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Pinpoint: How GPS is Changing Our World",
"author": "Greg Milner",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/06/03/pinpoint/"
}
],
"description": "Over the last fifty years, humanity has developed an extraordinary global utility which is omnipresent, universal, and available to all: the Global Positioning System (GPS). A network of twenty-four satellites and their monitoring stations on Earth, it makes possible almost all modern technology, from the smartphone in your pocket to the Mars rover. Neither the internet nor the cloud would work without it. And it is changing us in profound ways we've yet to come to terms with. While GPS has brought us breathtakingly accurate methods of timekeeping, navigation, and earthquake tracking, our overwhelming reliance on it is having unexpected consequences on our culture, and on ourselves. GPS is reshaping our thinking about privacy and surveillance, and brings with it the growing danger of GPS terrorism. Neuroscientists have even found that using GPS for navigation may be affecting our cognitive maps - possibly rearranging the grey matter in our heads - leading to the increasingly common phenomenon 'Death by GPS', in which drivers blindly follow their devices into deserts, lakes, and impassable mountains. Deeply researched, inventive and with fascinating insights into the way we think about our place in the world, Pinpoint reveals the way that the technologies we design to help us can end up shaping our lives. It is at once a grand history of science and a far-reaching book about contemporary culture.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=dKEHDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Technology",
"Travel"
],
"isbn_13": "9781847087102",
"pub_date": "2016-05-05",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War",
"author": "Mary Roach",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/06/03/grunt/"
}
],
"description": "A finalist for the Los Angeles Times Science & Technology Book Prize ‘The most entertaining writer in science’ – The Times, Books of the Year War. Mention it and most of us think of history, of conflicts on foreign soil, of heroism and compromise, of strategy and weapons. But there’s a whole other side to the gruesome business of the battlefield. In Grunt, the inimitable Mary Roach explores the science of keeping human beings intact, awake, sane, uninfected and uninfested in the bizarre and extreme circumstances of war. Setting about her task with infectious enthusiasm, she sniffs World War II stink bombs, tests earplugs in a simulated war zone and burns the midnight oil with the crew of a nuclear submarine. Speaking to the scientists and the soldiers, she learns about everything from life-changing medical procedures to innovations as esoteric as firing dead chickens at fighter jets. Engrossing, insightful and laugh-out-loud funny, this is an irresistible ride to the wilder shores of modern military life.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=3h29DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"War"
],
"isbn_13": "9781780749785",
"pub_date": "2016-09-01",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Who Cooked Adam Smith's Dinner?: A Story about Women and Economics",
"author": "Katrine Marçal",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/06/03/who-cooked-adam-smiths-dinner/"
}
],
"description": "Adam Smith, the founder of modern economics, believed that our actions stem from self-interest and the world turns because of financial gain. But every night Adam Smith's mother served him his dinner, not out of self-interest but out of love.Today, economics focuses on self-interest and excludes our other motivations. It disregards the unpaid work of mothering, caring, cleaning and cooking and its influence has spread from the market to how we shop, think and date. In this engaging takedown of the economics that has failed us, Katrine Maral journeys from Adam Smith's dinner table to the recent financial crisis and shows us how different, how much better, things could be.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=LW4VBgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Economics",
"Gender studies"
],
"isbn_13": "9781846275654",
"pub_date": "2015-03-05",
"pub_year": "2015"
},
{
"title": "Groovy Science: Knowledge, Innovation, and American Counterculture",
"author": "David Kaiser",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/06/03/groovy-science/"
}
],
"description": "Groovy Science paints a decidedly different picture of the sixties counterculture by uncovering an unabashed embrace of certain kinds of science and technology. While many rejected science and technology that struck them as hulking, depersonalized, or militarized, theirs was a rejection of Cold War-era missiles and mainframes, not science and technology per se. We see in these pages the long-running annual workshops on quantum physics at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California; aerospace engineers turning their knowledge of high-tech materials to the short board revolution in surfing; Timothy Leary s championing of space colonization as the ultimate high; and midwives redirecting their medical knowledge to launch a home-birth movement. Groovy Science gathers intriguing examples like these from across the physical, biological, and social sciences and charts commonalities across these many domains, highlighting shared trends and themes during one of the most colorful periods of recent American history. The result reveals a much more diverse picture of how Americans sought and found alternative forms of science that resonated with their social and political goals.\"",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=E1obDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"America",
"History of science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780226372914",
"pub_date": "2016-05-31",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Black Hole Blues And Other Songs from Outer Space",
"author": "Janna Levin",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/04/15/fear-and-loathing-in-the-hunt-for-gravitational-waves/"
}
],
"description": "The full inside story of the detection of gravitational waves at LIGO, one of the most ambitious feats in scientific history *Selected as a Book of the Year 2016 in the Sunday Times* 'This is empirical poetry. A fascinating tale of human curiosity beautifully told, and with black holes and lasers too' Robin Ince In 1916 Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves: miniscule ripples in the very fabric of spacetime generated by unfathomably powerful events. If such vibrations could somehow be recorded, we could observe our universe for the first time through sound: the hissing of the Big Bang, the low tones of merging galaxies, the drumbeat of two black holes collapsing into one... In 2016 a team of hundreds of scientists at work on a billion-dollar experiment made history when they announced the first ever detection of a gravitational wave, confirming Einstein’s prediction a century ago. Based on complete access to LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) and the scientists who created it, Black Hole Blues offers a first-hand account of this astonishing achievement: an intimate story of cutting-edge science at its most awe-inspiring and ambitious.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=CUIyCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Astrophysics"
],
"isbn_13": "9781446485095",
"pub_date": "2016-03-31",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Inside Graduate Admissions Merit, Diversity, and Faculty Gatekeeping",
"author": "Julie R. Posselt",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/03/11/who-benefits-from-the-ph-d-admissions-process-and-who-falls-through-the-cracks/"
}
],
"description": "How does graduate admissions work? Who does the system work for, and who falls through its cracks? More people than ever seek graduate degrees, but little has been written about who gets in and why. Drawing on firsthand observations of admission committees and interviews with faculty in 10 top-ranked doctoral programs in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, education professor Julie Posselt pulls back the curtain on a process usually conducted in secret. “Politicians, judges, journalists, parents and prospective students subject the admissions policies of undergraduate colleges and professional schools to considerable scrutiny, with much public debate over appropriate criteria. But the question of who gets into Ph.D. programs has by comparison escaped much discussion. That may change with the publication of Inside Graduate Admissions...While the departments reviewed in the book remain secret, the general process used by elite departments would now appear to be more open as a result of Posselt’s book.” —Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed “Revealing...Provide[s] clear, consistent insights into what admissions committees look for.” —Beryl Lieff Benderly, Science",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=055XCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Education",
"Graduate school"
],
"isbn_13": "9780674088696",
"pub_date": "2016-01-11",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "The Importance of Being Little What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups",
"author": "Erika Christakis",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/03/11/the-preschool-paradox-its-time-to-rethink-our-approach-to-early-education/"
}
],
"description": "“Christakis . . . expertly weaves academic research, personal experience and anecdotal evidence into her book . . . a bracing and convincing case that early education has reached a point of crisis . . . her book is a rare thing: a serious work of research that also happens to be well-written and personal . . . engaging and important.” --Washington Post \"What kids need from grown-ups (but aren't getting)...an impassioned plea for educators and parents to put down the worksheets and flash cards, ditch the tired craft projects (yes, you, Thanksgiving Handprint Turkey) and exotic vocabulary lessons, and double-down on one, simple word: play.\" --NPR.org The New York Times bestseller that provides a bold challenge to the conventional wisdom about early childhood, with a pragmatic program to encourage parents and teachers to rethink how and where young children learn best by taking the child’s eye view of the learning environment To a four-year-old watching bulldozers at a construction site or chasing butterflies in flight, the world is awash with promise. Little children come into the world hardwired to learn in virtually any setting and about any matter. Yet in today’s preschool and kindergarten classrooms, learning has been reduced to scripted lessons and suspect metrics that too often undervalue a child’s intelligence while overtaxing the child’s growing brain. These mismatched expectations wreak havoc on the family: parents fear that if they choose the “wrong” program, their child won’t get into the “right” college. But Yale early childhood expert Erika Christakis says our fears are wildly misplaced. Our anxiety about preparing and safeguarding our children’s future seems to have reached a fever pitch at a time when, ironically, science gives us more certainty than ever before that young children are exceptionally strong thinkers. In her pathbreaking book, Christakis explains what it’s like to be a young child in America today, in a world designed by and for adults, where we have confused schooling with learning. She offers real-life solutions to real-life issues, with nuance and direction that takes us far beyond the usual prescriptions for fewer tests, more play. She looks at children’s use of language, their artistic expressions, the way their imaginations grow, and how they build deep emotional bonds to stretch the boundaries of their small worlds. Rather than clutter their worlds with more and more stuff, sometimes the wisest course for us is to learn how to get out of their way. Christakis’s message is energizing and reassuring: young children are inherently powerful, and they (and their parents) will flourish when we learn new ways of restoring the vital early learning environment to one that is best suited to the littlest learners. This bold and pragmatic challenge to the conventional wisdom peels back the mystery of childhood, revealing a place that’s rich with possibility. From the Hardcover edition.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=wS46CQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Education"
],
"isbn_13": "9780698195011",
"pub_date": "2016-02-09",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Newton's Apple and Other Myths About Science",
"author": "Ronald L. Numbers",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/01/01/myth-busters-think-you-know-your-scientific-history-think-again/"
}
],
"description": "A falling apple inspired the law of gravity—or so the story goes. Is it true? Perhaps not. But why do such stories endure as explanations of how science happens? Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science brushes away popular misconceptions to provide a clearer picture of scientific breakthroughs from ancient times to the present.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=pWouCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"History of science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780674915473",
"pub_date": "2015-11-04",
"pub_year": "2015"
},
{
"title": "Denying to the Grave: Why We Ignore the Facts That Will Save Us",
"author": "Sara E. Gorman",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/denying-to-the-grave/"
}
],
"description": "Why do some parents refuse to vaccinate their children? Why do some people keep guns at home, despite scientific evidence of risk to their family members? And why do people use antibiotics for illnesses they cannot possibly alleviate? When it comes to health, many people insist that science is wrong, that the evidence is incomplete, and that unidentified hazards lurk everywhere. In Denying to the Grave, Gorman and Gorman, a father-daughter team, explore the psychology of health science denial. Using several examples of such denial as test cases, they propose six key principles that may lead individuals to reject \"accepted\" health-related wisdom: the charismatic leader; fear of complexity; confirmation bias and the internet; fear of corporate and government conspiracies; causality and filling the ignorance gap; and the nature of risk prediction. The authors argue that the health sciences are especially vulnerable to our innate resistance to integrate new concepts with pre-existing beliefs. This psychological difficulty of incorporating new information is on the cutting edge of neuroscience research, as scientists continue to identify brain responses to new information that reveal deep-seated, innate discomfort with changing our minds. Denying to the Grave explores risk theory and how people make decisions about what is best for them and their loved ones, in an effort to better understand how people think when faced with significant health decisions. This book points the way to a new and important understanding of how science should be conveyed to the public in order to save lives with existing knowledge and technology.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=RKykDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Neuroscience",
"Psychology",
"Risk theory"
],
"isbn_13": "9780199396603",
"pub_date": "2016-09-01",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Welcome to the Universe",
"author": "Neil deGrasse Tyson",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/welcome-to-the-universe/"
}
],
"description": "The New York Times bestselling tour of the cosmos from three of today's leading astrophysicists Welcome to the Universe is a personal guided tour of the cosmos by three of today's leading astrophysicists. Inspired by the enormously popular introductory astronomy course that Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott taught together at Princeton, this book covers it all—from planets, stars, and galaxies to black holes, wormholes, and time travel. Describing the latest discoveries in astrophysics, the informative and entertaining narrative propels you from our home solar system to the outermost frontiers of space. How do stars live and die? Why did Pluto lose its planetary status? What are the prospects of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe? How did the universe begin? Why is it expanding and why is its expansion accelerating? Is our universe alone or part of an infinite multiverse? Answering these and many other questions, the authors open your eyes to the wonders of the cosmos, sharing their knowledge of how the universe works. Breathtaking in scope and stunningly illustrated throughout, Welcome to the Universe is for those who hunger for insights into our evolving universe that only world-class astrophysicists can provide.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=0miYDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Astrophysics",
"Space"
],
"isbn_13": "9780691157245",
"pub_date": "2016-09-29",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "What the F: What Swearing Reveals about Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves",
"author": "Benjamin K. Bergen",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/what-the-f/"
}
],
"description": "It may be starred, beeped, and censored -- yet profanity is so appealing that we can't stop using it. In the funniest, clearest study to date, Benjamin Bergen explains why, and what that tells us about our language and brains. Nearly everyone swears-whether it's over a few too many drinks, in reaction to a stubbed toe, or in flagrante delicto. And yet, we sit idly by as words are banned from television and censored in books. We insist that people excise profanity from their vocabularies and we punish children for yelling the very same dirty words that we'll mutter in relief seconds after they fall asleep. Swearing, it seems, is an intimate part of us that we have decided to selectively deny. That's a damn shame. Swearing is useful. It can be funny, cathartic, or emotionally arousing. As linguist and cognitive scientist Benjamin K. Bergen shows us, it also opens a new window onto how our brains process language and why languages vary around the world and over time. In this groundbreaking yet ebullient romp through the linguistic muck, Bergen answers intriguing questions: How can patients left otherwise speechless after a stroke still shout Goddamn! when they get upset? When did a cock grow to be more than merely a rooster? Why is crap vulgar when poo is just childish? Do slurs make you treat people differently? Why is the first word that Samoan children say not mommy but eat shit? And why do we extend a middle finger to flip someone the bird? Smart as hell and funny as fuck, What the F is mandatory reading for anyone who wants to know how and why we swear.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=UCrXCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Linguistics"
],
"isbn_13": "9780465096480",
"pub_date": "2016-09-13",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy",
"author": "Cathy O'Neil",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/weapons-of-math-destruction/"
}
],
"description": "A former Wall Street quant sounds an alarm on the mathematical models that pervade modern life - and threaten to rip apart our social fabric We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives - where we go to school, whether we get a loan, how much we pay for insurance - are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated. And yet, as Cathy O'Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and incontestable, even when they're wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination. Tracing the arc of a person's life, O'Neil exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These \"weapons of math destruction\" score teachers and students, sort CVs, grant or deny loans, evaluate workers, target voters, and monitor our health. O'Neil calls on modellers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it's up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=60n0DAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Data science",
"Math"
],
"isbn_13": "9780141985428",
"pub_date": "2016-09-06",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Driverless: Intelligent Cars and the Road Ahead",
"author": "Hod Lipson",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/driverless/"
}
],
"description": "When human drivers let intelligent software take the wheel: the beginning of a new era in personal mobility.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=af8WDQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Artificial intelligence",
"Computer science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780262035224",
"pub_date": "2016-09-23",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Patient H.M. A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets",
"author": "Luke Dittrich",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/08/19/an-intimate-portrait-of-a-famous-amnesiac-is-also-a-tale-of-personal-grievances/"
}
],
"description": "In the summer of 1953, maverick neurosurgeon William Beecher Scoville performed a groundbreaking operation on an epileptic patient named Henry Molaison. But it was a catastrophic failure, leaving Henry unable to create long-term memories. Scoville's grandson, Luke Dittrich, takes us on an astonishing journey through the history of neuroscience, from the first brain surgeries in ancient Egypt to the New England asylum where his grandfather developed a taste for human experimentation. Dittrich's investigation confronts unsettling family secrets and reveals the dark roots of modern neuroscience, raising troubling questions that echo into the present day.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=nUIyCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Ethics",
"Medicine",
"Neuroscience"
],
"isbn_13": "9781448104680",
"pub_date": "2016-08-11",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "The War on Science Who's Waging It, Why It Matters, What We Can Do About It",
"author": "Shawn Lawrence Otto",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/07/01/in-a-stirring-call-to-action-an-author-probes-the-forces-that-undermine-evidence-based-science-policy/"
}
],
"description": "\"Wherever the people are well informed,\" Thomas Jefferson wrote, \"they can be trusted with their own government.\" But what happens when they are not? In every issue of modern society--from climate change to vaccinations, transportation to technology, health care to defense--we are in the midst of an unprecedented expansion of scientific progress and a simultaneous expansion of danger. At the very time we need them most, scientists and the idea of objective knowledge are being bombarded by avast, well-funded, three-part war on science: the identity politics war on science, the ideological war on science, and the industrial war on science. The result is an unprecedented erosion of thought in Western democracies as voters, policymakers, and justices actively ignore the evidence from science, leaving major policy decisions to be based more on the demands of the most strident voices. Shawn Otto's compelling new book investigates the historical, social, philosophical, political, and emotional reasons why evidence-based politics are in decline and authoritarian politics are once again on the rise on both left and right, and provides some compelling solutions to bring us to our collective senses, before it's too late.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=ZJAtjgEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Climate change",
"Science and Society",
"Science policy"
],
"isbn_13": "1571313532",
"pub_date": "2016",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "The Unknown Universe: What We Don't Know About Time and Space in Ten Chapters",
"author": "Stuart Clark",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/06/03/the-unknown-universe/"
}
],
"description": "On 21 March 2013, the European Space Agency released a map of the afterglow of the Big Bang. Taking in 440 sextillion kilometres of space and 13.8 billion years of time, it is physically impossible to make a better map: we will never see the early Universe in more detail. On the one hand, such a view is the apotheosis of modern cosmology, on the other, it threatens to undermine almost everything we hold cosmologically sacrosanct. The map contains anomalies that challenge our understanding of the Universe. It will force us to revisit what is known and what is unknown, to construct a new model of our Universe. This is the first book to address what will be an epoch-defining scientific paradigm shift. Stuart Clark will ask if Newton's famous laws of gravity need to be rewritten, if dark matter and dark energy are just celestial phantoms? Can we ever know what happened before the Big Bang? What's at the bottom of a black hole? Are there Universes beyond our own? Does time exist? Are the once immutable laws of physics changing?",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=WBlzCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Space"
],
"isbn_13": "9781781855737",
"pub_date": "2015-09-10",
"pub_year": "2015"
},
{
"title": "Listening to a Continent Sing: Birdsong by Bicycle from the Atlantic to the Pacific",
"author": "Donald Kroodsma",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/06/03/listening-to-a-continent-sing-birdsong-by-bicycle-from-the-atlantic-to-the-pacific/"
}
],
"description": "Join birdsong expert Donald Kroodsma on a ten-week, ten-state bicycle journey as he travels with his son from the Atlantic to the Pacific, lingering and listening to our continent sing as no one has before. On remote country roads, over terrain vast and spectacular, from dawn to dusk and sometimes through the night, you will gain a deep appreciation for the natural symphony of birdsong many of us take for granted. Come along and marvel at how expressive these creatures are as Kroodsma leads you west across nearly five thousand miles—at a leisurely pace that enables a deep listen. Listening to a Continent Sing is also a guided tour through the history of a young nation and the geology of an ancient landscape, and an invitation to set aside the bustle of everyday life to follow one's dreams. It is a celebration of flowers and trees, rocks and rivers, mountains and prairies, clouds and sky, headwinds and calm, and of local voices and the people you will meet along the way. It is also the story of a father and son deepening their bond as they travel the slow road together from coast to coast. Beautifully illustrated throughout with drawings of birds and scenes and featuring QR codes that link to audio birdsong, this poignant and insightful book takes you on a travel adventure unlike any other—accompanied on every leg of your journey by birdsong.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=uViYDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Ornithology",
"Travel"
],
"isbn_13": "9780691180892",
"pub_date": "2018-05-08",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality, and Utopia",
"author": "Michael Shermer",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/01/22/heavens-on-earth/"
}
],
"description": "A scientific exploration into humanity’s obsession with the afterlife and quest for immortality from the bestselling author and skeptic Michael Shermer In his most ambitious work yet, Shermer sets out to discover what drives humans’ belief in life after death, focusing on recent scientific attempts to achieve immortality along with utopian attempts to create heaven on earth. For millennia, religions have concocted numerous manifestations of heaven and the afterlife, and though no one has ever returned from such a place to report what it is really like—or that it even exists—today science and technology are being used to try to make it happen in our lifetime. From radical life extension to cryonic suspension to mind uploading, Shermer considers how realistic these attempts are from a proper skeptical perspective. Heavens on Earth concludes with an uplifting paean to purpose and progress and how we can live well in the here-and-now, whether or not there is a hereafter.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=zcYoDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Death",
"Psychology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781627798563",
"pub_date": "2018-01-09",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "The Last Man Who Knew Everything: The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age",
"author": "David N. Schwartz",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/01/17/the-last-man-who-knew-everything/"
}
],
"description": "The definitive biography of the brilliant, charismatic, and very human physicist and innovator Enrico Fermi In 1942, a team at the University of Chicago achieved what no one had before: a nuclear chain reaction. At the forefront of this breakthrough stood Enrico Fermi. Straddling the ages of classical physics and quantum mechanics, equally at ease with theory and experiment, Fermi truly was the last man who knew everything--at least about physics. But he was also a complex figure who was a part of both the Italian Fascist Party and the Manhattan Project, and a less-than-ideal father and husband who nevertheless remained one of history's greatest mentors. Based on new archival material and exclusive interviews, The Last Man Who Knew Everything lays bare the enigmatic life of a colossus of twentieth century physics.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=-niZDgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Enrico Fermi",
"Science lives"
],
"isbn_13": "9780465093120",
"pub_date": "2017-12-05",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Quarks to Culture: How We Came to Be",
"author": "Tyler Volk",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/01/16/quarks-to-culture/"
}
],
"description": "Our world is nested, both physically and socially, and at each level we find innovations that are necessary for the next. Consider: atoms combine to form molecules, molecules combine to form single-celled organisms; when people come together, they build societies. Physics has gone far in mapping the basic mechanics of the simplest things and the dynamics of the overall nesting, as have biology and the social sciences for their fields. But what can we say about this beautifully complex whole? How does one stage shape another, and what can we learn about human existence through understanding an enlarged field of creation and being? In Quarks to Culture, Tyler Volk answers these questions, revealing how a universal natural rhythm—building from smaller things into larger, more complex things—resulted in a grand sequence of twelve fundamental levels across the realms of physics, biology, and culture. He introduces the key concept of “combogenesis,” the building-up from combination and integration to produce new things with innovative relations. He explores common themes in how physics and chemistry led to biological evolution, and biological evolution to cultural evolution. Volk also provides insights into linkages across the sciences and fields of scholarship, and presents an exciting synthesis of ideas along a sequence of things and relations, from physical to living to cultural. The resulting inclusive natural philosophy brings clarity to our place in the world, offering a roadmap for those who seek to understand big history and wrestle with questions of how we came to be.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=2xuSDgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Complexity",
"Emergence"
],
"isbn_13": "9780231544139",
"pub_date": "2017-05-02",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds",
"author": "Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/01/09/frankenstein/"
}
],
"description": "Includes corrected 1818 text of the novel and seven essays about the novel.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=GlT5DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Ethics",
"Science and Literature"
],
"isbn_13": "9780262533287",
"pub_date": "2017",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "I, Mammal: The Story of What Makes Us Mammals",
"author": "Liam Drew",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/01/08/i-mammal/"
}
],
"description": "Humans are mammals. Most of us appreciate that at some level. But what does it mean for us to have more in common with a horse and an elephant than we do with a parrot, snake or frog? After a misdirected football left new father Liam Drew clutching a uniquely mammalian part of his anatomy, he decided to find out more. Considering himself as a mammal first and a human second, Liam delves into ancient biological history to understand what it means to be mammalian. In his humorous and engaging style, Liam explores the different characteristics that distinguish mammals from other types of animals. He charts the evolution of milk, warm blood and burgeoning brains, and examines the emergence of sophisticated teeth, exquisite ears, and elaborate reproductive biology, plus a host of other mammalian innovations. Entwined are tales of zoological peculiarities and reflections on how being a mammal has shaped the author's life. I, Mammal is a history of mammals and their ancestors and of how science came to grasp mammalian evolution. And in celebrating our mammalian-ness, Liam Drew binds us a little more tightly to the five and a half thousand other species of mammal on this planet and reveals the deep roots of many traits humans hold dear.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=RGonDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Developmental Biology",
"Evolutionary Biology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781472922922",
"pub_date": "2017-11-02",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age",
"author": "Matthew J. Salganik",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/01/02/bit-by-bit/"
}
],
"description": "An innovative and accessible guide to doing social research in the digital age The rapid spread of social media, smartphones, and other digital wonders enables us to collect and process data about human behavior on a scale never before imaginable, offering entirely new approaches to core questions about social behavior. Bit by Bit is the key to unlocking these powerful methods. In this authoritative and accessible book, Matthew Salganik explains how the digital revolution is transforming the way social scientists observe behavior, ask questions, run experiments, and engage in mass collaborations. Featuring a wealth of real-world examples and invaluable advice on how to tackle the thorniest ethical challenges, Bit by Bit is the essential guide to doing social research in this fast-evolving digital age.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=58iXDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Social Science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780691196107",
"pub_date": "2019-08-06",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Beyond Politics: The Private Governance Response to Climate Change",
"author": "Michael P. Vandenbergh",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/18/beyond-politics/"
}
],
"description": "Private sector action provides one of the most promising opportunities to reduce the risks of climate change, buying time while governments move slowly or even oppose climate mitigation. Starting with the insight that much of the resistance to climate mitigation is grounded in concern about the role of government, this books draws on law, policy, social science, and climate science to demonstrate how private initiatives are already bypassing government inaction in the US and around the globe. It makes a persuasive case that private governance can reduce global carbon emissions by a billion tons per year over the next decade. Combining an examination of the growth of private climate initiatives over the last decade, a theory of why private actors are motivated to reduce emissions, and a review of viable next steps, this book speaks to scholars, business and advocacy group managers, philanthropists, policymakers, and anyone interested in climate change.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=W68_DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Climate change"
],
"isbn_13": "9781316856642",
"pub_date": "2017-12-21",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Robins!: How They Grow Up",
"author": "Eileen Christelow",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/robins/"
}
],
"description": "\"A look at the life cycle and habits of our most beloved and familiar bird\"--",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=sGLpjwEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Animal Biology",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "054444289X",
"pub_date": "2017-02-07",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "To Burp or Not to Burp: A Guide to Your Body in Space",
"author": "Dafydd Rhys Williams",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/to-burp-or-not-to-burp/"
}
],
"description": "Join former NASA astronaut Dr. Dave Williams as he answers questions about how zero gravity affects the human body.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=RvEmvgEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Physiology",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "1643108085",
"pub_date": "2019",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "The Formative Years of Relativity: The History and Meaning of Einstein's Princeton Lectures",
"author": "Hanoch Gutfreund",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/22/the-formative-years-of-relativity/"
}
],
"description": "First published in 1922 and based on lectures delivered in May 1921, Albert Einstein’s The Meaning of Relativity offered an overview and explanation of the then new and controversial theory of relativity. The work would go on to become a monumental classic, printed in numerous editions and translations worldwide. Now, The Formative Years of Relativity introduces Einstein’s masterpiece to new audiences. This beautiful volume contains Einstein’s insightful text, accompanied by important historical materials and commentary looking at the origins and development of general relativity. Hanoch Gutfreund and Jürgen Renn provide fresh, original perspectives, placing Einstein’s achievements into a broader context for all readers. In this book, Gutfreund and Renn tell the rich story behind the early reception, spread, and consequences of Einstein’s ideas during the formative years of general relativity in the late 1910s and 1920s. They show that relativity’s meaning changed radically throughout the nascent years of its development, and they describe in detail the transformation of Einstein’s work from the esoteric pursuit of one individual communicating with a handful of colleagues into the preoccupation of a growing community of physicists, astronomers, mathematicians, and philosophers. This handsome edition quotes extensively from Einstein’s correspondence and reproduces historical documents such as newspaper articles and letters. Inserts are featured in the main text giving concise explanations of basic concepts, and short biographical notes and photographs of some of Einstein’s contemporaries are included. The first-ever English translations of two of Einstein’s popular Princeton lectures are featured at the book’s end.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=VYi9DgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Einstein",
"General Relativity",
"Physics"
],
"isbn_13": "9781400888689",
"pub_date": "2017-09-08",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "The Less You Know the Sounder You Sleep",
"author": "Juliet Butler",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/15/a-fictionalized-story-of-two-real-sisters-sheds-light-on-the-darker-side-of-human-research/"
}
],
"description": "‘Do yourself a favour and read this wonderful book’ Scotsman Based on the true story of conjoined Russian twins, Masha and Dasha Krivoshlyapova, The Less You Know the Sounder You Sleep is a tale of survival and self-determination, innocence and lies.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=o14-DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Human Subjects Research",
"Twin Studies"
],
"isbn_13": "9780008290481",
"pub_date": "2018-05-01",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Inside the Lost Museum: Curating, Past and Present",
"author": "Steven D. Lubar",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/14/a-behind-the-scenes-museum-tour-offers-insight-into-the-once-and-future-roles-of-these-iconic-institutions/"
}
],
"description": "Museum lovers know that energy and mystery run through every exhibition. Steven Lubar explains work behind the scenes—collecting, preserving, displaying, and using art and artifacts in teaching, research, and community-building—through historical and contemporary examples, especially the lost but reimagined Jenks Museum at Brown University.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=Mn0uDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Curation",
"Museum Science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780674971042",
"pub_date": "2017-08-07",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Life Through Time and Space",
"author": "Wallace Arthur",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/09/life-through-time-and-space/"
}
],
"description": "All humans share three origins: the beginning of our individual lives, the appearance of life on Earth, and the formation of our planetary home. Wallace Arthur combines embryological, evolutionary, and cosmological perspectives to tell the story of life on Earth and its potential to exist elsewhere in the universe.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=3fstDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Astrobiology",
"Developmental Biology"
],
"isbn_13": "9780674982277",
"pub_date": "2017-08-07",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence",
"author": "Max Tegmark",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/02/a-physicist-explores-the-future-of-artificial-intelligence/"
}
],
"description": "'This is the most important conversation of our time, and Tegmark's thought-provoking book will help you join it' Stephen Hawking THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER. DAILY TELEGRAPH AND THE TIMES BOOKS OF THE YEAR SELECTED AS ONE OF BARACK OBAMA'S FAVOURITE BOOKS OF 2018 AI is the future - but what will that future look like? Will superhuman intelligence be our slave, or become our god? Taking us to the heart of the latest thinking about AI, Max Tegmark, the MIT professor whose work has helped mainstream research on how to keep AI beneficial, separates myths from reality, utopias from dystopias, to explore the next phase of our existence. How can we grow our prosperity through automation, without leaving people lacking income or purpose? How can we ensure that future AI systems do what we want without crashing, malfunctioning or getting hacked? Should we fear an arms race in lethal autonomous weapons? Will AI help life flourish as never before, or will machines eventually outsmart us at all tasks, and even, perhaps, replace us altogether? 'This is a rich and visionary book and everyone should read it' The Times",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=3_otDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Artificial intelligence",
"Computer science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780141981796",
"pub_date": "2017-08-29",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States",
"author": "James C. Scott",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/01/hunters-and-foragers-thrived-while-early-agrarian-societies-struggled-argues-an-anthropologist/"
}
],
"description": "An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations that contradict the standard narrative. Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today's states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family-all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction. Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the \"barbarians\" who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.",
"cover_url": "",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Anthropology"
],
"isbn_13": "0302240217",
"pub_date": "2017",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution",
"author": "Jonathan B. Losos",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/07/25/improbable-destinies/"
}
],
"description": "A Harvard museum curator draws on the latest breakthroughs in evolutionary biology to examine how tiny, random convergences, from mutations to butterfly sneezes, have triggered remarkable evolutionary changes.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=HJkrDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Evolution"
],
"isbn_13": "9780399184925",
"pub_date": "2017",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Face Value: The Irresistible Influence of First Impressions",
"author": "Alexander Todorov",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/07/18/we-know-better-so-why-cant-we-stop-making-snap-judgments-based-on-appearance/"
}
],
"description": "The scientific story of first impressions—and why the snap character judgments we make from faces are irresistible but usually incorrect We make up our minds about others after seeing their faces for a fraction of a second—and these snap judgments predict all kinds of important decisions. For example, politicians who simply look more competent are more likely to win elections. Yet the character judgments we make from faces are as inaccurate as they are irresistible; in most situations, we would guess more accurately if we ignored faces. So why do we put so much stock in these widely shared impressions? What is their purpose if they are completely unreliable? In this book, Alexander Todorov, one of the world's leading researchers on the subject, answers these questions as he tells the story of the modern science of first impressions. Drawing on psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, computer science, and other fields, this accessible and richly illustrated book describes cutting-edge research and puts it in the context of the history of efforts to read personality from faces. Todorov describes how we have evolved the ability to read basic social signals and momentary emotional states from faces, using a network of brain regions dedicated to the processing of faces. Yet contrary to the nineteenth-century pseudoscience of physiognomy and even some of today's psychologists, faces don't provide us a map to the personalities of others. Rather, the impressions we draw from faces reveal a map of our own biases and stereotypes. A fascinating scientific account of first impressions, Face Value explains why we pay so much attention to faces, why they lead us astray, and what our judgments actually tell us.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=mH8rDgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Cognitive Science",
"Perception",
"Psychology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781400885725",
"pub_date": "2017-05-30",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "What Do Science, Technology, and Innovation Mean From Africa?",
"author": "Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/07/17/africas-innovation-often-occurs-outside-the-formal-sector-but-it-should-still-count-as-science/"
}
],
"description": "Clapperton Mavhunga's collection of essays about science, technology, and innovation (STI) from an African perspective opens with the idea, \"Things do not (always) mean the same from everywhere; when we insist that only 'our' meaning is the meaning, we silence other people's meanings.\" Mavhunga and his contributors argue that our contemporary definitions of STI are those of countries and cultures that have acquired their dominance of others through global empires, and as a counter to that, Mavhunga seeks to put the concepts of STI into question, exploring what the technological, scientific, and innovative might mean from Africa in lieu of outside introductions or influences. We strongly feel that this book is suited to the Knowledge Unlatched program because of the difficulty of reaching markets and readers in Africa with print books. We feel unlatching would go a long way toward helping Mavhunga reach an important audience for this work that we have been previously unable to reach.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=hzAnDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Africa",
"Global Science",
"History of science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780262533904",
"pub_date": "2017-06-16",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals",
"author": "Barbara Natterson-Horowitz",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/24/wildhood/"
}
],
"description": "Publishers Weekly Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2019 A New York Times Editor’s Pick People Best Books Fall 2019 Chicago Tribune 28 Books You Need to Read Now Booklist’s Top Ten Sci-Tech Books of 2019 “It blew my mind to discover that teenage animals and teenage humans are so similar. Both are naive risk-takers. I loved this book!” —Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human and Animals in Translation A revelatory investigation of human and animal adolescence and young adulthood from the New York Times bestselling authors of Zoobiquity. With Wildhood, Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and award-winning science writer Kathryn Bowers have created an entirely new way of thinking about the crucial, vulnerable, and exhilarating phase of life between childhood and adulthood across the animal kingdom. In their critically acclaimed bestseller, Zoobiquity, the authors revealed the essential connection between human and animal health. In Wildhood, they turn the same eye-opening, species-spanning lens to adolescent young adult life. Traveling around the world and drawing from their latest research, they find that the same four universal challenges are faced by every adolescent human and animal on earth: how to be safe, how to navigate hierarchy; how to court potential mates; and how to feed oneself. Safety. Status. Sex. Self-reliance. How human and animal adolescents and young adults confront the challenges of wildhood shapes their adult destinies. Natterson-Horowitz and Bowers illuminate these core challenges through the lives of four animals in the wild: Ursula, a young king penguin; Shrink, a charismatic hyena; Salt, a matriarchal humpback whale; and Slavc, a roaming European wolf. Through their riveting stories—and those of countless others, from adventurous eagles and rambunctious high schooler to inexperienced orcas and naive young soldiers—readers get a vivid and game-changing portrait of adolescent young adults as a horizontal tribe, sharing behaviors and challenges, setbacks and triumphs. Upending our understanding of everything from risk-taking and anxiety to the origins of privilege and the nature of sexual coercion and consent, Wildhood is a profound and necessary guide to the perilous, thrilling, and universal journey to adulthood on planet earth.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=j06qDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781501164699",
"pub_date": "2019-09-17",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World",
"author": "Bryan Walsh",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/16/end-times/"
}
],
"description": "In this history of extinction and existential risk, a Newsweek and Bloomberg popular science and investigative journalist examines our most dangerous mistakes -- and explores how we can protect and future-proof our civilization. End Times is a compelling work of skilled reportage that peels back the layers of complexity around the unthinkable -- and inevitable -- end of humankind. From asteroids and artificial intelligence to volcanic supereruption to nuclear war, veteran science reporter and TIME editor Bryan Walsh provides a stunning panoramic view of the most catastrophic threats to the human race. In End Times, Walsh examines threats that emerge from nature and those of our own making: asteroids, supervolcanoes, nuclear war, climate change, disease pandemics, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, and extraterrestrial intelligence. Walsh details the true probability of these world-ending catastrophes, the impact on our lives were they to happen, and the best strategies for saving ourselves, all pulled from his rigorous and deeply thoughtful reporting and research. Walsh goes into the room with the men and women whose job it is to imagine the unimaginable. He includes interviews with those on the front lines of prevention, actively working to head off existential threats in biotechnology labs and government hubs. Guided by Walsh's evocative, page-turning prose, we follow scientific stars like the asteroid hunters at NASA and the disease detectives on the trail of the next killer virus. Walsh explores the danger of apocalypse in all forms. In the end, it will be the depth of our knowledge, the height of our imagination, and our sheer will to survive that will decide the future.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=2DFzDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780316449601",
"pub_date": "2019-08-27",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": " The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt",
"author": "Andrea Wulf",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/10/the-adventures-of-alexander-von-humboldt/"
}
],
"description": "From the New York Times bestselling author of The Invention of Nature, comes a breathtakingly illustrated and brilliantly evocative recounting of Alexander Von Humboldt's five year expedition in South America. Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, but his most revolutionary idea was a radical vision of nature as a complex and interconnected global force that does not exist for the use of humankind alone. His theories and ideas were profoundly influenced by a five-year exploration of South America. Now Andrea Wulf partners with artist Lillian Melcher to bring this daring expedition to life, complete with excerpts from Humboldt's own diaries, atlases, and publications. She gives us an intimate portrait of the man who predicted human-induced climate change, fashioned poetic narrative out of scientific observation, and influenced iconic figures such as Simón Bolívar, Thomas Jefferson, Charles Darwin, and John Muir. This gorgeous account of the expedition not only shows how Humboldt honed his groundbreaking understanding of the natural world but also illuminates the man and his passions.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=b4qRDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781524747374",
"pub_date": "2019",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "The Deep History of Ourselves: The Four-Billion-Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains",
"author": "Joseph LeDoux",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/09/the-deep-history-of-ourselves/"
}
],
"description": "Longlisted for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award A leading neuroscientist offers a history of the evolution of the brain from unicellular organisms to the complexity of animals and human beings today Renowned neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux digs into the natural history of life on earth to provide a new perspective on the similarities between us and our ancestors in deep time. This page-turning survey of the whole of terrestrial evolution sheds new light on how nervous systems evolved in animals, how the brain developed, and what it means to be human. In The Deep History of Ourselves, LeDoux argues that the key to understanding human behavior lies in viewing evolution through the prism of the first living organisms. By tracking the chain of the evolutionary timeline he shows how even the earliest single-cell organisms had to solve the same problems we and our cells have to solve each day. Along the way, LeDoux explores our place in nature, how the evolution of nervous systems enhanced the ability of organisms to survive and thrive, and how the emergence of what we humans understand as consciousness made our greatest and most horrendous achievements as a species possible.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=3GJjDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780735223844",
"pub_date": "2019-08-27",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "The Republic of Color: Science, Perception, and the Making of Modern America",
"author": "Michael Rossi",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/03/the-republic-of-color/"
}
],
"description": "The Republic of Color delves deep into the history of color science in the United States to unearth its origins and examine the scope of its influence on the industrial transformation of turn-of-the-century America. For a nation in the grip of profound economic, cultural, and demographic crises, the standardization of color became a means of social reform—a way of sculpting the American population into one more amenable to the needs of the emerging industrial order. Delineating color was also a way to characterize the vagaries of human nature, and to create ideal structures through which those humans would act in a newly modern American republic. Michael Rossi’s compelling history goes far beyond the culture of the visual to show readers how the control and regulation of color shaped the social contours of modern America—and redefined the way we see the world.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=1WCnDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780226651729",
"pub_date": "2019-08-30",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes",
"author": "Dana Thomas",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/03/fashionopolis/"
}
],
"description": "An investigation into the damage wrought by the colossal clothing industry – and the grassroots, high tech, international movement fighting to reform it. What should I wear? It's one of the fundamental questions we ask ourselves every day. More than ever, we are told it should be something new. Today, the clothing industry churns out 80 billion garments a year and employs every sixth person on Earth. Historically, the apparel trade has exploited labour, the environment, and intellectual property – and in the last three decades, with the simultaneous unfurling of fast fashion, globalization, and the tech revolution, those abuses have multiplied exponentially – and primarily out of view. We are in dire need of an entirely new human-scale model. Bestselling journalist Dana Thomas has travelled the globe to discover the visionary designers and companies who are propelling the industry toward that more positive future by reclaiming traditional craft and launching cutting-edge sustainable technologies to produce better fashion. In Fashionopolis, Thomas sees renewal in a host of developments, including printing 3-D clothes, clean denim processing, smart manufacturing, hyperlocalism, fabric recycling – even lab-grown materials. From small-town makers and Silicon Valley whizzes to household names such as Stella McCartney, Levi's and Selfridges, Thomas highlights the companies big and small that are leading the crusade. We all have been casual about our clothes. It's time to get dressed with intention. Fashionopolis is the first comprehensive look at how to start.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=K7ORDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781789546057",
"pub_date": "2019-09-05",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "The Nature of Life and Death: Every Body Leaves a Trace",
"author": "Patricia Wiltshire",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/03/the-nature-of-life-and-death/"
}
],
"description": "A riveting blend of science writing and true-crime narrative that explores the valuable but often shocking interface between crime and nature--and the secrets each can reveal about the other--from a pioneer in forensic ecology and a trailblazing female scientist. From mud tracks on a quiet country road to dirt specks on the soles of walking boots, forensic ecologist Patricia Wiltshire uses her decades of scientific expertise to find often-overlooked clues left behind by criminal activity. She detects evidence and eliminates hypotheses armed with little more than a microscope, eventually developing a compelling thesis of the who, what, how, and when of a crime. Wiltshire's remarkable accuracy has made her one of the most in-demand police consultants in the world, and her curiosity, humility, and passion for the truth have guided her every step of the way. A riveting blend of science writing and true-crime narrative, The Nature of Life and Death details Wiltshire's unique journey from college professor to crime fighter: solving murders, locating corpses, and exonerating the falsely accused. Along the way, she introduces us to the unseen world all around us and underneath our feet: plants, animals, pollen, spores, fungi, and microbes that we move through every day. Her story is a testament to the power of persistence and reveals how our relationship with the vast natural world reaches far deeper than we might think.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=hTGLDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780525542247",
"pub_date": "2019-09-03",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Why Trust Science?",
"author": "Naomi Oreskes",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/03/why-trust-science/"
}
],
"description": "Why the social character of scientific knowledge makes it trustworthy Are doctors right when they tell us vaccines are safe? Should we take climate experts at their word when they warn us about the perils of global warming? Why should we trust science when so many of our political leaders don't? Naomi Oreskes offers a bold and compelling defense of science, revealing why the social character of scientific knowledge is its greatest strength—and the greatest reason we can trust it. Tracing the history and philosophy of science from the late nineteenth century to today, this timely and provocative book features a new preface by Oreskes and critical responses by climate experts Ottmar Edenhofer and Martin Kowarsch, political scientist Jon Krosnick, philosopher of science Marc Lange, and science historian Susan Lindee, as well as a foreword by political theorist Stephen Macedo.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=mO0EEAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780691212265",
"pub_date": "2021-04-06",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "Superheavy: Making and Breaking the Periodic Table",
"author": "Kit Chapman",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/03/superheavy/"
}
],
"description": "Shortlisted for the 2020 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize for Excellence in Science Books Creating an element is no easy feat. It's the equivalent of firing six trillion bullets a second at a needle in a haystack, hoping the bullet and needle somehow fuse together, then catching it in less than a thousandth of a second – after which it's gone forever. Welcome to the world of the superheavy elements: a realm where scientists use giant machines and spend years trying to make a single atom of mysterious artefacts that have never existed on Earth. From the first elements past uranium and their role in the atomic bomb to the latest discoveries stretching our chemical world, Superheavy will reveal the hidden stories lurking at the edges of the periodic table. Why did the US Air Force fly planes into mushroom clouds? Who won the transfermium wars? How did an earthquake help give Japan its first element? And what happened when Superman almost spilled nuclear secrets? In a globe-trotting adventure that stretches from the United States to Russia, Sweden to Australia, Superheavy is your guide to the amazing science filling in the missing pieces of the periodic table. By the end you'll not only marvel at how nuclear science has changed our lives – you'll wonder where it's going to take us in the future.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=CGiDDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781472953919",
"pub_date": "2019-06-13",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Try This! Extreme: 50 Fun & Safe Experiments for the Mad Scientist in You",
"author": "Karen Romano Young",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/try-this-extreme/"
}
],
"description": "\"Experiments for young children to conduct to learn about science\"--",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=Er8yDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"DIY Science",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "9781426328633",
"pub_date": "2017",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Darwin’s Backyard: How Small Experiments Led to a Big Change",
"author": "James T. Costa",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/darwins-backyard-2/"
}
],
"description": "“If you’ve ever fantasized walking and conversing with the great scientist on the subjects that consumed him, and now wish to add the fullness of reality, read this book.” —Edward O. Wilson, author of Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life James T. Costa takes readers on a journey from Darwin’s childhood through his voyage on the HMS Beagle, where his ideas on evolution began, and on to Down House, his bustling home of forty years. Using his garden and greenhouse, the surrounding meadows and woodlands, and even the cellar and hallways of his home-turned-field-station, Darwin tested ideas of his landmark theory of evolution through an astonishing array of experiments without using specialized equipment. From those results, he plumbed the laws of nature and drew evidence for the revolutionary arguments of On the Origin of Species and other watershed works. This unique perspective introduces us to an enthusiastic correspondent, collaborator, and, especially, an incorrigible observer and experimenter. And it includes eighteen experiments for home, school, or garden. Finalist for the 2018 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prizes for Excellence in Science Books.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=YtdDDQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Darwin",
"Young Adult"
],
"isbn_13": "9780393249156",
"pub_date": "2017-09-05",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Inside Your Insides: A Guide to the Microbes That Call You Home",
"author": "Claire Eamer",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/inside-your-insides/"
}
],
"description": "None of us are ever really alone — not with the trillions and trillions of microbes that call our bodies home. Recent scientific research has uncovered just how interdependent our relationships with these tiny “hitchhikers” are, and that lots of them are actually good for us! Filled with intriguing information and just enough yuck factor, kids will be thrilled to discover what a big deal these small “critters” who live in and on their bodies are. No hand sanitizer required!",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=KATaDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Microbiome",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "9781771387545",
"pub_date": "2016-09-06",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Beauty and the Beak: How Science, Technology, and a 3D-printed Beak Rescued a Bald Eagle",
"author": "Deborah Lee Rose",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/beauty-and-the-beak/"
}
],
"description": "This California Reads-recommended title of the California Teachers Association chronicles the story of the wild bald eagle that made world news when she was illegally shot, rescued, and received a pioneering, 3D-printed prosthetic beak. Full color.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=xaEqvAEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Engineering",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "1943978387",
"pub_date": "2019-03-27",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Caesar’s Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us",
"author": "Sam Kean",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/caesars-last-breath-2/"
}
],
"description": "** GUARDIAN SCIENCE BOOK OF THE YEAR 2017 ** ‘Popular science at its best’ Mail on Sunday ‘Eminently accessible and enjoyable’ Observer With every breath, you literally inhale the history of the world. On the ides of March, 44 BC, Julius Caesar died of stab wounds in the Roman Senate, but the story of his last breath is still unfolding. In fact, you're probably inhaling some of it now. Of the sextillions of molecules entering or leaving your lungs at this moment, some might also bear traces of Cleopatra's perfumes, German mustard gas, particles exhaled by dinosaurs or emitted by atomic bombs, even remnants of stardust from the universe's creation. In Caesar’s Last Breath, New York Times bestselling author Sam Kean takes us on a journey through the periodic table, around the globe and across time to tell the epic story of the air we breathe.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=kbWRDQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Gases",
"Young Adult"
],
"isbn_13": "9781473543768",
"pub_date": "2017-07-20",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "If You Were the Moon",
"author": "Laura Purdie Salas",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/if-you-were-the-moon/"
}
],
"description": "An inventive and spirited exploration that combines poetic elements and science to introduce young readers to the role of the moon in our lives here on Earth.",
"cover_url": "",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Astronomy",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "1338262416",
"pub_date": "2018",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Animals by the Numbers: A Book of Infographics",
"author": "Steve Jenkins",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/animals-by-the-numbers/"
}
],
"description": "How many species are there across the globe? How much do all of the insects in the world collectively weigh? How far can animals travel? Steve Jenkins answers these questions and many more with numbers, images, innovation, and authoritative science in his latest work of illustrated nonfiction. Jenkins layers his signature cut-paper illustrations alongside computer graphics and a text that is teeming with fresh, unexpected, and accurate zoological information ready for readers to easily devour. The level of scientific research paired with Jenkins’ creativity and accessible infographics is unmatched and sure to wow fans old and new.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=m8ylDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Animals",
"Data Visualization",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "9781328664129",
"pub_date": "2016-11-01",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Droughts",
"author": "Michael Woods",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/droughts/"
}
],
"description": "Explains what droughts are and what causes them, provides the history of droughts around the world, and describes how scientists study them and what can be done to relieve or prevent them.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=KY_RSpzbaWkC&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Weather",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "9780822565765",
"pub_date": "2006-12-26",
"pub_year": "2006"
},
{
"title": "Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist",
"author": "Jess Keating",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/shark-lady/"
}
],
"description": "One of New York Times' Twelve Books for Feminist Boys and Girls! This is the story of a woman who dared to dive, defy, discover, and inspire. This is the story of Shark Lady. One of the best science picture books for children, Shark Lady is a must for both teachers and parents alike! An Amazon Best Book of the Month Named a Best Children's Book of 2017 by Parents magazine Eugenie Clark fell in love with sharks from the first moment she saw them at the aquarium. She couldn't imagine anything more exciting than studying these graceful creatures. But Eugenie quickly discovered that many people believed sharks to be ugly and scary—and they didn't think women should be scientists. Determined to prove them wrong, Eugenie devoted her life to learning about sharks. After earning several college degrees and making countless discoveries, Eugenie wrote herself into the history of science, earning the nickname \"Shark Lady.\" Through her accomplishments, she taught the world that sharks were to be admired rather than feared and that women can do anything they set their minds to. An inspiring story by critically acclaimed zoologist Jess Keating about finding the strength to discover truths that others aren't daring enough to see. Includes a timeline of Eugenie's life and many fin-tastic shark facts! The perfect choice for parents looking for: Books about sharks Inspiring nonfiction narrative books Role model books for girls and boys Kids STEM books",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=ZMz5DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Marine Biology",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "9781492642053",
"pub_date": "2017-06-06",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "This Book Stinks!: Gross Garbage, Rotten Rubbish, and the Science of Trash",
"author": "Sarah Wassner Flynn",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/12/05/this-book-stinks/"
}
],
"description": "Get up close and personal with a wonderful world of waste. From composting and recycling, to landfills and dumps, to how creative people are finding new ways to reuse rubbish. It's fun to talk trash when it's jam-packed with infographics, thematic spreads, wow-worthy photos, sidebars, serious stats, and fabulous facts. Also included are quizzes and activities to inspire kids to take action, be proactive, and rethink the things we throw away.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=Kpo8DgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Waste Recycling",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "9781426327308",
"pub_date": "2017",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Why Torture Doesn't Work: The Neuroscience of Interrogation ",
"author": "Shane O'Mara",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2015/10/16/cruel-and-unuseful-punishment-why-torture-doesnt-work/"
}
],
"description": "Besides being cruel and inhumane, torture does not work the way torturers assume it does. As Shane O’Mara’s account of the neuroscience of suffering reveals, extreme stress creates profound problems for memory, mood, and thinking, and sufferers predictably produce information that is deeply unreliable, or even counterproductive and dangerous.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=sZ9XCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Neuroscience"
],
"isbn_13": "9780674743908",
"pub_date": "2015-11-30",
"pub_year": "2015"
},
{
"title": "Networking for Nerds: Find, Access and Land Hidden Game-Changing Career Opportunities Everywhere ",
"author": "Alaina G. Levine",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2015/09/18/the-introverts-guide-to-making-contacts-count/"
}
],
"description": "Networking for Nerds provides a step-by-step guide to understanding how to access hidden professional opportunities through networking. With an emphasis on practical advice on how and why to network, you will learn how to formulate and execute a strategic networking plan that is dynamic, multidimensional, and leverages social media platforms and other networking channels. An invaluable resource for both established and early-career scientists and engineers (as well as networking neophytes!), Networking for Nerds offers concrete insight on crafting professional networks that are mutually beneficial and support the advancement of both your career goals and your scholarly ambitions. “Networking” does not mean going to one reception or speaking with a few people at one conference, and never contacting them again. Rather, “networking” involves a spectrum of activities that engages both parties, ensures everyone’s value is appropriately communicated, and allows for the exploration of a win-win collaboration of some kind. Written by award-winning entrepreneur and strategic career planning expert Alaina G. Levine, Networking for Nerds is an essential resource for anyone working in scientific and engineering fields looking to enhance their professional planning for a truly fulfilling, exciting, and stimulating career. professional planning for a truly fulfilling, exciting, and stimulating career.Networking for Nerds provides a step-by-step guide to understanding how to access hidden professionalopportunities through networking. With an emphasis on practical advice on how and why to network, youwill learn how to formulate and execute a strategic networking plan that is dynamic, multidimensional, andleverages social media platforms and other networking channels.An invaluable resource for both established and early-career scientists and engineers (as well as networkingneophytes!), Networking for Nerds offers concrete insight on crafting professional networks that aremutually beneficial and support the advancement of both your career goals and your scholarly ambitions.“Networking” does not mean going to one reception or speaking with a few people at one conference, andnever contacting them again. Rather, “networking” involves a spectrum of activities that engages bothparties, ensures everyone’s value is appropriately communicated, and allows for the exploration of a win-wincollaboration of some kind.Written by award-winning entrepreneur and strategic career planning expert Alaina G. Levine, Networking forNerds is an essential resource for anyone working in scientific and engineering fields looking to enhance theirprofessional planning for a truly fulfilling, exciting, and stimulating career.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=Mm5XCQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Professional Development"
],
"isbn_13": "9781118663554",
"pub_date": "2015-05-13",
"pub_year": "2015"
},
{
"title": "Why Did the Chicken Cross the World? The Epic Saga of the Bird That Powers Civilization",
"author": "Andrew Lawler",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2015/03/06/from-darwin-to-the-dinner-table-the-domesticated-chicken-has-influenced-human-history-in-a-number-of-surprising-ways/"
}
],
"description": "\"Beginning in the jungles of Southeast Asia, trekking through the Middle East, traversing the Pacific, Lawler discovers the secrets behind the chicken's transformation from a shy, wild bird into an animal of astonishing versatility, capable of serving our species' changing needs. Across the ages, it has been an all-purpose medicine, sex symbol, gambling aid, inspiration for bravery, and of course, the star of the world's most famous joke. Only recently has it become humanity's most important single source of protein. Most surprisingly, the chicken--more than the horse, cow , or dog-- has been a remarkable constant in the sperad of civilization across the globe\"--Page 4 of cover.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=LE8ADAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Ornithology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781476729909",
"pub_date": "2016-04-26",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": " I Think You'll Find It's a Bit More Complicated Than That",
"author": "Ben Goldacre",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2015/02/06/breaking-bad-science-a-physician-exposes-the-many-misuses-of-science-in-the-media/"
}
],
"description": "The very best journalism from one of Britain’s most admired and outspoken science writers, author of the bestselling Bad Science and Bad Pharma.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=hdZzAwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Science and Society",
"Statistics"
],
"isbn_13": "9780007505159",
"pub_date": "2014-10-23",
"pub_year": "2014"
},
{
"title": "The Peripheral",
"author": "William Gibson",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2015/01/09/a-futuristic-time-travel-tale-resonates-today/"
}
],
"description": "Flynne Fisher lives in rural near-future America where jobs are scarce and veterans from the wars are finding it hard to recover. She scrapes a living doing some freelance online game-playing, participating in some pretty weird stuff. Wilf Netherton lives in London, seventy-some years later, on the far side of decades of slow-motion apocalypse. Things though are good for the haves, and there aren't many have-nots left. Flynne and Wilf are about to meet one another. Her world will be altered utterly, and Wilf's, for all its decadence and power, will learn that some of these third-world types from the distant past can be real badass.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=PbKUAwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Science and Society",
"Science Fiction"
],
"isbn_13": "9780241961018",
"pub_date": "2014-11-20",
"pub_year": "2014"
},
{
"title": "Energy: A Human History",
"author": "Richard Rhodes",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/06/04/energy-a-human-history/"
}
],
"description": "A “meticulously researched” (The New York Times Book Review) examination of energy transitions over time and an exploration of the current challenges presented by global warming, a surging world population, and renewable energy—from Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning author Richard Rhodes. People have lived and died, businesses have prospered and failed, and nations have risen to world power and declined, all over energy challenges. Through an unforgettable cast of characters, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes explains how wood gave way to coal and coal made room for oil, as we now turn to natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable energy. “Entertaining and informative…a powerful look at the importance of science” (NPR.org), Rhodes looks back on five centuries of progress, through such influential figures as Queen Elizabeth I, King James I, Benjamin Franklin, Herman Melville, John D. Rockefeller, and Henry Ford. In his “magisterial history…a tour de force of popular science” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review), Rhodes shows how breakthroughs in energy production occurred; from animal and waterpower to the steam engine, from internal-combustion to the electric motor. He looks at the current energy landscape, with a focus on how wind energy is competing for dominance with cast supplies of coal and natural gas. He also addresses the specter of global warming, and a population hurtling towards ten billion by 2100. Human beings have confronted the problem of how to draw energy from raw material since the beginning of time. Each invention, each discovery, each adaptation brought further challenges, and through such transformations, we arrived at where we are today. “A beautifully written, often inspiring saga of ingenuity and progress…Energy brings facts, context, and clarity to a key, often contentious subject” (Booklist, starred review).",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=pGBEDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Energy"
],
"isbn_13": "9781501105371",
"pub_date": "2018-05-29",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Fundamentals of Microbiome Science: How Microbes Shape Animal Biology",
"author": "Angela E. Douglas",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/30/fundamentals-of-microbiome-science/"
}
],
"description": "An essential introduction to microbiome science, a new cutting-edge discipline that is transforming the life sciences This book provides an accessible and authoritative guide to the fundamental principles of microbiome science, an exciting and fast-emerging new discipline that is reshaping many aspects of the life sciences. Resident microbes in healthy animals--including humans—can dictate many traits of the animal host. This animal microbiome is a second immune system conferring protection against pathogens; it can structure host metabolism in animals as diverse as reef corals and hibernating mammals; and it may influence animal behavior, from social recognition to emotional states. These microbial partners can also drive ecologically important traits, from thermal tolerance to diet, and have contributed to animal diversification over long evolutionary timescales. Drawing on concepts and data across a broad range of disciplines and systems, Angela Douglas provides a conceptual framework for understanding these animal-microbe interactions while shedding critical light on the scientific challenges that lie ahead. Douglas explains why microbiome science demands creative and interdisciplinary thinking—the capacity to combine microbiology with animal physiology, ecological theory with immunology, and evolutionary perspectives with metabolic science. An essential introduction to a cutting-edge field that is revolutionizing the life sciences, this book explains why microbiome science presents a more complete picture of the biology of humans and other animals, and how it can deliver novel therapies for many medical conditions and new strategies for pest control.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=z5IMEAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Microbiology",
"Microbiome"
],
"isbn_13": "9780691217710",
"pub_date": "2021-06",
"pub_year": "2021"
},
{
"title": "Orca: How We Came to Know and Love the Ocean’s Greatest Predator",
"author": "Jason Michael Colby",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/29/orca/"
}
],
"description": "Drawing on interviews, official records, private archives, and the author's own family history, this is the definitive story of how the feared and despised \"killer\" became the beloved \"orca\", and what that has meant for our relationship with the ocean and its creatures",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=dHhUDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Marine Biology"
],
"isbn_13": "9780190673093",
"pub_date": "2018-05-08",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain",
"author": "Sarah-Jayne Blakemore",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/24/inventing-ourselves/"
}
],
"description": "'You will understand your children better for reading it.' The Times 'Beautifully written with clarity, expertise and honesty about the most important subject for all of us. I couldn't put it down.' Professor Robert Winston An insightful and inspiring read from award-winning neuroscienist, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore Sarah-Jayne Blakemore explains: · What makes the adolescent brain different? · Why does an easy child become a challenging teenager? · What drives the excessive risk-taking and the need for intense friendships common to teenagers? · Why it is that many mental illnesses – depression, addiction, schizophrenia – begin during these formative years. And she shows that while adolescence is a period of vulnerability, it is also a time of enormous creativity and opportunity. What readers are saying: *****'An accessible, optimistic and illuminating book.' *****'Essential reading for parents and teachers of adolescents.' *****'Relevant, fascinating and captivating.'",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=UPIpDQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Neuroscience"
],
"isbn_13": "9781473527256",
"pub_date": "2018-03-22",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "The Ashtray (Or the Man Who Denied Reality)",
"author": "Errol Morris",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/22/the-ashtray/"
}
],
"description": "In 1972, philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn threw an ashtray at Errol Morris. This book is the result. At the time, Morris was a graduate student. Now we know him as one of the most celebrated and restlessly probing filmmakers of our time, the creator of such classics of documentary investigation as The Thin Blue Line and The Fog of War. Kuhn, meanwhile, was—and, posthumously, remains—a star in his field, the author of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, a landmark book that has sold well over a million copies and introduced the concept of “paradigm shifts” to the larger culture. And Morris thought the idea was bunk. The Ashtray tells why—and in doing so, it makes a powerful case for Morris’s way of viewing the world, and the centrality to that view of a fundamental conception of the necessity of truth. “For me,” Morris writes, “truth is about the relationship between language and the world: a correspondence idea of truth.” He has no patience for philosophical systems that aim for internal coherence and disdain the world itself. Morris is after bigger game: he wants to establish as clearly as possible what we know and can say about the world, reality, history, our actions and interactions. It’s the fundamental desire that animates his filmmaking, whether he’s probing Robert McNamara about Vietnam or the oddball owner of a pet cemetery. Truth may be slippery, but that doesn’t mean we have to grease its path of escape through philosophical evasions. Rather, Morris argues powerfully, it is our duty to do everything we can to establish and support it. In a time when truth feels ever more embattled, under siege from political lies and virtual lives alike, The Ashtray is a bracing reminder of its value, delivered by a figure who has, over decades, uniquely earned our trust through his commitment to truth. No Morris fan should miss it.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=sQVnDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Philosophy"
],
"isbn_13": "9780226922706",
"pub_date": "2018-05-16",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity",
"author": "Carl Zimmer",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/21/she-has-her-mothers-laugh/"
}
],
"description": "The untold story of how hereditary data in mental hospitals gave rise to the science of human heredity In the early 1800s, a century before there was any concept of the gene, physicians in insane asylums began to record causes of madness in their admission books. Almost from the beginning, they pointed to heredity as the most important of these causes. Genetics in the Madhouse is the untold story of how the collection of hereditary data in asylums and prisons gave rise to a new science of human heredity. Theodore Porter looks at the institutional use of innovative quantitative practices—such as pedigree charts and censuses of mental illness—that were worked out in the madhouse long before the manipulation of DNA became possible in the lab. Genetics in the Madhouse brings to light the hidden history behind modern genetics and deepens our appreciation of the moral issues at stake in data work conducted at the border of subjectivity and science.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=Qju-DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Genetics",
"Heredity"
],
"isbn_13": "9780691203232",
"pub_date": "2020-05-12",
"pub_year": "2020"
},
{
"title": "The Travel Diaries of Albert Einstein: The Far East, Palestine, and Spain, 1922–1923",
"author": "Albert Einstein",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/15/the-travel-diaries-of-albert-einstein/"
}
],
"description": "The first publication of Albert Einstein’s travel diary to the Far East and Middle East In the fall of 1922, Albert Einstein, along with his then-wife, Elsa Einstein, embarked on a five-and-a-half-month voyage to the Far East and Middle East, regions that the renowned physicist had never visited before. Einstein's lengthy itinerary consisted of stops in Hong Kong and Singapore, two brief stays in China, a six-week whirlwind lecture tour of Japan, a twelve-day tour of Palestine, and a three-week visit to Spain. This handsome edition makes available, for the first time, the complete journal that Einstein kept on this momentous journey. The telegraphic-style diary entries--quirky, succinct, and at times irreverent—record Einstein's musings on science, philosophy, art, and politics, as well as his immediate impressions and broader thoughts on such events as his inaugural lecture at the future site of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, a garden party hosted by the Japanese Empress, an audience with the King of Spain, and meetings with other prominent colleagues and statesmen. Entries also contain passages that reveal Einstein's stereotyping of members of various nations and raise questions about his attitudes on race. This beautiful edition features stunning facsimiles of the diary's pages, accompanied by an English translation, an extensive historical introduction, numerous illustrations, and annotations. Supplementary materials include letters, postcards, speeches, and articles, a map of the voyage, a chronology, a bibliography, and an index. Einstein would go on to keep a journal for all succeeding trips abroad, and this first volume of his travel diaries offers an initial, intimate glimpse into a brilliant mind encountering the great, wide world.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=-lRGDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Einstein",
"Science lives"
],
"isbn_13": "9781400889952",
"pub_date": "2018-05-29",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup",
"author": "John Carreyrou",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/14/bad-blood/"
}
],
"description": "'I couldn’t put down this thriller . . . the perfect book to read by the fire this winter.' Bill Gates, '5 books I loved in 2018' WINNER OF THE FINANCIAL TIMES/MCKINSEY BUSINESS BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2018 The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of Theranos, the multibillion-dollar biotech startup, by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end, despite pressure from its charismatic CEO and threats by her lawyers. In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup \"unicorn\" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. In Bad Blood, John Carreyrou tells the riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley. Now to be adapted into a film, with Jennifer Lawrence to star. 'Chilling . . . Reads like a West Coast version of All the President’s Men.' New York Times Book Review",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=sClUDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Biotechnology",
"Medical Diagnostics",
"Silicon Valley"
],
"isbn_13": "9781509868094",
"pub_date": "2018-05-31",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World",
"author": "Steve Brusatte",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/08/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-dinosaurs/"
}
],
"description": "The Times Science Book of the Year A Sunday Times Bestseller 'Thrilling . . . the best book on the subject written for the general reader since the 1980s.' The Sunday Times 66 million years ago the dinosaurs were wiped from the face of the earth. Today, Dr. Steve Brusatte, one of the leading scientists of a new generation of dinosaur hunters, armed with cutting edge technology, is piecing together the complete story of how the dinosaurs ruled the earth for 150 million years. The world of the dinosaurs has fascinated on book and screen for decades – from early science fiction classics like The Lost World, to Godzilla terrorizing the streets of Tokyo, and the monsters of Jurassic Park. But what if we got it wrong? In The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs, top dinosaur expert Brusatte, tells the real story of how dinosaurs rose to dominate the planet. Using the fossil clues that have been gathered using state of the art technology, Brusatte follows these magnificent creatures from their beginnings in the Early Triassic period, through the Jurassic period to their final days in the Cretaceous and the legacy that they left behind. Along the way, Brusatte introduces us to modern day dinosaur hunters and gives an insight into what it’s like to be a paleontologist. The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs is full of thrilling accounts of some of his personal discoveries, including primitive human-sized tyrannosaurs, monstrous carnivores even larger than T. rex, and feathered raptor dinosaurs preserved in lava from China. At a time when Homo sapiens has existed for less than 200,000 years and we are already talking about planetary extinction, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs is a timely reminder of what humans can learn from the magnificent creatures who ruled the earth before us.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=0Dg9DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Paleontology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781509830084",
"pub_date": "2018-05-03",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence",
"author": "Michael Pollan",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/05/07/how-to-change-your-mind/"
}
],
"description": "'It's as if we made entering gothic cathedrals illegal, or museums, or sunsets!' When LSD was first discovered in the 1940s, it seemed to researchers, scientists and doctors as if the world might be on the cusp of psychological revolution. It promised to shed light on the deep mysteries of consciousness, as well as offer relief to addicts and the mentally ill. But in the 1960s, with the vicious backlash against the counter-culture, all further research was banned. In recent years, however, work has quietly begun again on the amazing potential of LSD, psilocybin and DMT. Could these drugs in fact improve the lives of many people? Diving deep into this extraordinary world and putting himself forward as a guinea-pig, Michael Pollan has written a remarkable history of psychedelics and a compelling portrait of the new generation of scientists fascinated by the implications of these drugs. How to Change Your Mind is a report from what could very well be the future of human consciousness.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=UfG1uwEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Consciousness",
"Neuroscience",
"Psychopharmacology"
],
"isbn_13": "0141985135",
"pub_date": "2019-05-30",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Dinner with Darwin: Food, Drink, and Evolution",
"author": "Jonathan Silvertown",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/09/05/dinner-with-darwin/"
}
],
"description": "What do eggs, flour, and milk have in common? They form the basis of waffles, of course, but these staples of breakfast bounty also share an evolutionary function: eggs, seeds (from which we derive flour by grinding), and milk have each evolved to nourish offspring. Indeed, ponder the genesis of your breakfast, lunch, or dinner, and you’ll soon realize that everything we eat and drink has an evolutionary history. In Dinner with Darwin, join Jonathan Silvertown for a multicourse meal of evolutionary gastronomy, a tantalizing tour of human taste that helps us to understand the origins of our diets and the foods that have been central to them for millennia—from spices to spirits. A delectable concoction of coevolution and cookery, gut microbiomes and microherbs, and both the chicken and its egg, Dinner with Darwin reveals that our shopping lists, recipe cards, and restaurant menus don’t just contain the ingredients for culinary delight. They also tell a fascinating story about natural selection and its influence on our plates—and palates. Digging deeper, Silvertown’s repast includes entrées into GMOs and hybrids, and looks at the science of our sensory interactions with foods and cooking—the sights, aromas, and tastes we experience in our kitchens and dining rooms. As is the wont of any true chef, Silvertown packs his menu with eclectic components, dishing on everything from Charles Darwin’s intestinal maladies to taste bud anatomy and turducken. Our evolutionary relationship with food and drink stretches from the days of cooking cave dwellers to contemporary crêperies and beyond, and Dinner with Darwin serves up scintillating insight into the entire, awesome span. This feast of soup, science, and human society is one to savor. With a wit as dry as a fine pinot noir and a cache of evolutionary knowledge as vast as the most discerning connoisseur’s wine cellar, Silvertown whets our appetites—and leaves us hungry for more.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=yrQvDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Evolution",
"Gastronomy"
],
"isbn_13": "9780226489230",
"pub_date": "2017-09-05",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "The Fear Factor: How One Emotion Connects Altruists, Psychopaths, and Everyone In-Between",
"author": "Abigail Marsh",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/09/05/the-fear-factor/"
}
],
"description": "How the brains of psychopaths and heroes show that humans are wired to be good At fourteen, Amber could boast of killing her guinea pig, threatening to burn down her home, and seducing men in exchange for gifts. She used the tools she had available to get what she wanted, like all children. But unlike other children, she didn't care about the damage she inflicted. A few miles away, Lenny Skutnik cared so much about others that he jumped into an ice-cold river to save a drowning woman. What is responsible for the extremes of generosity and cruelty humans are capable of? By putting psychopathic children and extreme altruists in an fMRI, acclaimed psychologist Abigail Marsh found that the answer lies in how our brain responds to others' fear. While the brain's amygdala makes most of us hardwired for good, its variations can explain heroic and psychopathic behavior. A path-breaking read, The Fear Factor is essential for anyone seeking to understand the heights and depths of human nature. \"A riveting ride through your own brain.\"--Adam Grant \"You won't be able to put it down.\"--Daniel Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of Stumbling on Happiness \"[It] reads like a thriller... One of the most mind-opening books I have read in years.\" --Matthieu Ricard, Author of Altruism",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=T6W7DgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Neuroscience",
"Psychology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781541697201",
"pub_date": "2017-10-10",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Clockwork Futures: The Science of Steampunk and the Reinvention of the Modern World",
"author": "Brandy Schillace",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/09/05/clockwork-futures/"
}
],
"description": "Airships and electric submarines, automatons and mesmerists?welcome to the wild world of steampunk. It is all speculative?or is it? Meet the intrepid souls who pushed Victorian technology to its limits and paved the way for our present age. The gear turns, the whistle blows, and the billows expand with electro-mechanical whirring. The shimmering halo of Victorian technology lures us with the stuff of dreams, of nostalgia, of alternate pasts and futures that entice with the suave of James Bond and the savvy of Sherlock Holmes. Fiction, surely. But what if the unusual gadgetry so often depicted as “steampunk” actually made an appearance in history? Zeppelins and steam-trains; arc-lights and magnetic rays: these fascinating (and sometimes doomed) inventions bounded from the tireless minds of unlikely heroes. Such men and women served no secret societies and fought no super-villains, but they did build engines, craft automatons, and engineer a future they hoped would run like clockwork. Along the way, however, these same inventors ushered in a contest between desire and dread. From Newton to Tesla, from candle and clockwork to the age of electricity and manufactured power, technology teetered between the bright dials of fantastic futures and the dark alleyways of industrial catastrophe. In the mesmerizing Clockwork Futures, Brandy Schillace reveals the science behind steampunk, which is every bit as extraordinary as what we might find in the work of Jules Verne, and sometimes, just as fearful. These stories spring from the scientific framework we have inherited. They shed light on how we pursue science, and how we grapple with our destiny—yesterday, today, and tomorrow.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=JYYyDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Science Fiction",
"Steampunk"
],
"isbn_13": "9781681775821",
"pub_date": "2017-09-05",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything",
"author": "Kelly Weinersmith",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/09/05/soonish/"
}
],
"description": "What will the world of tomorrow be like? How does progress happen? And why don't we have a lunar colony already? In this witty and entertaining book, Kelly and Zach Weinersmith give us a snapshot of the transformative technologies that are coming next - from robot swarms to nuclear fusion powered-toasters - and explain how they will change our world in astonishing ways. By weaving together their own research, interviews with pioneering scientists and Zach's trademark comics, the Weinersmiths investigate why these innovations are needed, how they would work, and what is standing in their way.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=cHLuswEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Invention",
"Technology"
],
"isbn_13": "1846149002",
"pub_date": "2019-10-03",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Planet Hunters: The Search for Extraterrestrial Life",
"author": "Lucas Ellerbroek",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/09/05/planet-hunters/"
}
],
"description": "Astronomers are on the verge of answering one of our most profound questions: are we alone in the universe? The ability to detect life in remote solar systems is at last within sight, and its discovery—even if only in microbial form—would revolutionize our self-image. Planet Hunters is the rollicking tale of the search for extraterrestrial life and the history of an academic discipline. Astronomer Lucas Ellerbroek takes readers on a fantastic voyage through space, time, history, and even to the future as he describes the field of exoplanet research, from the early ideas of sixteenth-century heretic Giordano Bruno to the discovery of the first exoplanet in 1995 to the invention of the Kepler Space Telescope. We join him on his travels as he meets with leading scientists in the field, including Michel Mayor, who discovered the first exoplanet, and Bill Borucki, principal investigator for NASA’s Kepler mission. Taken together, the experiences, passion, and perseverance of the scientists featured here make the book an exciting and compelling read. Presenting cutting-edge research in a dynamic and accessible way, Planet Hunters is a refreshing look into a field where new discoveries come every week and paradigms shift every year.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=45MrDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Astrobiology",
"Exoplanets"
],
"isbn_13": "9781780238784",
"pub_date": "2017-09-15",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Insider Trading: How Mortuaries, Medicine and Money Have Built a Global Market in Human Cadaver Parts",
"author": "Naomi Pfeffer",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/09/05/insider-trading/"
}
],
"description": "The cadaver industry in Britain and the United States, its processes and profits Except for organ transplantation little is known about the variety of stuff extracted from corpses and repurposed for medicine. A single body might be disassembled to provide hundreds of products for the millions of medical treatments performed each year. Cadaver skin can be used in wound dressings, corneas used to restore sight. Parts may even be used for aesthetic enhancement, such as liquefied skin injections to smooth wrinkles. This book is a history of the nameless corpses from which cadaver stuff is extracted and the entities involved in removing, processing, and distributing it. Pfeffer goes behind the mortuary door to reveal the technical, imaginative, and sometimes underhanded practices that have facilitated the global industry of transforming human fragments into branded convenience products. The dead have no need of cash, but money changes hands at every link of the supply chain. This book refocuses attention away from individual altruism and onto professional and corporate ethics.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=Lf6jDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Health and Medicine",
"Organ Transplants"
],
"isbn_13": "9780300227185",
"pub_date": "2017-09-12",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Catching Breath: The Making and Unmaking of Tuberculosis",
"author": "Kathryn Lougheed",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/30/catching-breath/"
}
],
"description": "Tuberculosis is an ancient disease, but it's not a disease of history. With more than a million victims every year – more than any other disease, including malaria – and antibiotic resistance now found in every country worldwide, tuberculosis is once again proving itself to be one of the smartest killers humanity has ever faced. But it's hardly surprising considering how long it's had to hone its skills. Forty-thousand years ago, our ancestors set off from the cradle of civilisation on their journey towards populating the planet. Tuberculosis hitched a lift and came with us, and it's been there ever since; waiting, watching, and learning. In The Robber of Youth, Kathryn Lougheed, a former TB research scientist, tells the story of how tuberculosis and humanity have grown up together, with each being shaped by the other in more ways than you could imagine. This relationship between man and microbe has spanned many millennia and has left its mark on both species. We can see evidence of its constant shadow in our genes; in the bones of the ancient dead; in art, music and literature. Tuberculosis has shaped societies - and it continues to do so today. The organism responsible for TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has had plenty of time to adapt to its chosen habitat – human lungs – and has learnt through natural selection to be an almost perfect pathogen. Using our own immune cells as a Trojan Horse to aid its spread, it's come up with clever ways to avoid being killed by antibiotics. But patience has been its biggest lesson - the bacterium can enter into a latent state when times are tough, only to come back to life when a host's immune system can no longer put up a fight. Today, more than one million people die of the disease every year and around one-third of the world's population are believed to be infected. That's more than two billion people. Throw in the compounding problems of drug resistance, the HIV epidemic and poverty, and it's clear that tuberculosis remains one of the most serious problems in world medicine. The Robber of Youth follows the history of TB through the ages, from its time as an infection of hunter-gatherers to the first human villages, which set it up with everything it needed to become the monstrous disease it is today, through to the perils of industrialisation and urbanisation. It goes on to look at the latest research in fighting the disease, with stories of modern scientific research, interviews doctors on the frontline treating the disease, and the personal experiences of those affected by TB.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=MSCLDQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Public Health",
"Tubercolosis"
],
"isbn_13": "9781472930361",
"pub_date": "2017-06-15",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Inheritors of the Earth: How Nature Is Thriving in an Age of Extinction",
"author": "Chris D. Thomas",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/29/inheritors-of-the-earth/"
}
],
"description": "It is accepted wisdom today that human beings have irrevocably damaged the natural world. Yet what if this narrative obscures a more hopeful truth? In Inheritors of the Earth, renowned ecologist and environmentalist Chris D. Thomas overturns the accepted story, revealing how nature is fighting back. Many animals and plants actually benefit from our presence, raising biological diversity in most parts of the world and increasing the rate at which new species are formed, perhaps to the highest level in Earth's history. From Costa Rican tropical forests to the thoroughly transformed British landscape, nature is coping surprisingly well in the human epoch. Chris Thomas takes us on a gripping round-the-world journey to meet the enterprising creatures that are thriving in the Anthropocene, from York's ochre-coloured comma butterfly to hybrid bison in North America, scarlet-beaked pukekos in New Zealand, and Asian palms forming thickets in the European Alps. In so doing, he questions our irrational persecution of so-called 'invasive species', and shows us that we should not treat the Earth as a faded masterpiece that we need to restore. After all, if life can recover from the asteroid that killed off the dinosaurs, might it not be able to survive the onslaughts of a technological ape? Combining a naturalist's eye for wildlife with an ecologist's wide lens, Chris Thomas forces us to re-examine humanity's relationship with nature, and reminds us that the story of life is the story of change.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=eC7eDQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Adaptation",
"Biodiversity",
"Climate change"
],
"isbn_13": "9780241240762",
"pub_date": "2017-07-06",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "The Emoji Code: The Linguistics Behind Smiley Faces and Scaredy Cats",
"author": "Vyvyan Evans",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/24/podcast-qa-with-vyvyan-evans-author-of-the-emoji-code/"
}
],
"description": "Drawing from disciplines as diverse as linguistics, cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience, The Emoji Code explores how emojis are expanding communication and not ending it. For all the handwringing about the imminent death of written language, emoji—those happy faces and hearts—is not taking us backward to the dark ages of illiteracy. Every day 41.5 billion texts are sent by one quarter of the world, using 6 million emoji. Evans argues that these symbols enrich our ability to communicate and allow us to express our emotions and induce empathy—ultimately making us all better communicators. The Emoji Code charts the evolutionary origins of language, the social and cultural factors that govern its use, change, and development; as well as what it reveals about the human mind. In most communication, nonverbal cues are our emotional expression, signal our personality, and are our attitude toward our addressee. They provide the essential means of nuance and are essential to getting our ideas across. But in digital communication, these cues are missing, which can lead to miscommunication. The explosion of emoji, in less than four years, has arisen precisely because it fulfills exactly these functions which are essential for communication but are otherwise absent in texts and emails. Evans persuasively argues that emoji add tone and an emotional voice and nuance, making us more effective communicators in the digital age.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=aCy2DQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Linguistics",
"Social Science"
],
"isbn_13": "9781250129079",
"pub_date": "2017-08-01",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Grand Canyon for Sale: : Public Lands versus Private Interests in the Era of Climate Change",
"author": "Stephen Nash",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2017/08/23/grand-canyon-for-sale/"
}
],
"description": "Grand Canyon For Sale is a carefully researched investigation of the precarious future of America's public lands: our national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, monuments, and wildernesses. Taking the Grand Canyon as its key example, and using on-the-ground reporting as well as science research, the book makes plain that accelerating climate change will dislocate wildlife populations and vegetation across hundreds of thousands of square miles of the national landscape. So what’s the plan, as the next phase of our political history begins? Consolidating protected areas and prioritizing natural systems over mining, grazing, drilling and logging will be essential. But a growing political movement, well financed and occasionally violent, is fighting to break up these federal lands and return them to state, local, and private control. That scheme would foreclose the future for many wild species, which are part of our irreplaceable natural heritage, and would lead directly to the ruin of our national parks and forests. Grand Canyon For Sale is an excellent overview of the physical, biological, and political challenges facing our national parks and U.S. public lands today.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=woMlDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Environmental Policy",
"Public Lands"
],
"isbn_13": "9780520291478",
"pub_date": "2017-09-05",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Trash Revolution: Breaking the Waste Cycle",
"author": "Erica Fyvie",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/trash-revolution/"
}
],
"description": "\"The Waste Cycle covers the entire life cycle from beginning to end - and back again - for a truly big-picture look at how things are sourced, made, used and then trashed and/or recycled into new materials. Plastic plates made from pig pee? Drinkable wastewater? Strange (and gross!) but soon-to-be true! Divided into 9 chapters, The Waste Cycle explores the life cycle of a different raw material a kid might typically tote in his or her backpack on any given school day (water, food, clothing, paper, plastics, metals and electronics.) The application of each raw material is presented as a 'recipe, ' with each component itemized to reveal the big picture, e.g., what goes into making (and subsequently recycling) a basic cotton T-shirt, a PET plastic water bottle or a cell phone. Two additional chapters explore the ultimate closed loop system setting of space, and the concept of zero waste. Back matter includes glossary, select bibliography and other information resources, and index.\"--",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=jjM8DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Environmental Science"
],
"isbn_13": "9781771380782",
"pub_date": "2018-04-03",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "A House in the Sky: And Other Uncommon Animal Houses",
"author": "Steve Jenkins",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/a-house-in-the-sky/"
}
],
"description": "Caldecott Honor recipient Steve Jenkins shines as the author of this amusing and thorough introduction to animal homes. Turtles, birds, fish, beavers, and kangaroos are just like people--they need homes, and take up residence in unusual places. A simple main text introduces similarities between human and animal homes while sidebars detail the unique qualities of each animal and its home. Stylized yet realistic watercolor illustrations prove that nonfiction can be accurate and elegant, and readers of all ages will appreciate this layered narrative.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=CiQOEAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Animal Habitats"
],
"isbn_13": "9781684520732",
"pub_date": "2020-12-11",
"pub_year": "2020"
},
{
"title": "Iqbal and His Ingenious Idea: How a Science Project Helps One Family and the Planet",
"author": "Elizabeth Suneby",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/iqbal-and-his-ingenious-idea/"
}
],
"description": "A boy, a science project and an answer to a critical problem. During monsoon season in Bangladesh, Iqbal’s mother must cook the family’s meals indoors, over an open fire, even though the smoke makes her and the family sick. So when Iqbal hears that his school’s science fair has the theme of sustainability, he comes up with the perfect idea for his entry: he’ll design a stove that doesn’t produce smoke! Has Iqbal found a way to win first prize in the science fair while providing cleaner air and better health for his family at the same time? Sometimes it takes a kid to imagine a better idea — make that an ingenious one!",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=V8RXDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Sustainability"
],
"isbn_13": "9781525300905",
"pub_date": "2018-05-01",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "My First Book of Quantum Physics",
"author": "Sheddad Kaid-Salah Ferrón",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/my-first-book-of-quantum-physics/"
}
],
"description": "Everything around us - trees, buildings, food, light, water, air and even ourselves - is composed of minute particles, smaller than a nanometre (a billionth of a metre). Quantum physics is the science of these particles and without it none of our electronic devices, from smartphones to computers and microwave ovens, would exist. But quantum physics also pushes us to the very boundaries of what we know about science, reality and the structure of the universe. The world of quantum physics is an amazing place, where quantum particles can do weird and wonderful things, acting totally unlike the objects we experience in day-to-day life. How can atoms exist in two places at once? And just how can a cat be dead and alive at the same time? Find out more with this entertaining illustrated guide to the fascinating, mysterious world of quantum physics.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=lUdwswEACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Physics"
],
"isbn_13": "1787080102",
"pub_date": "2018-03-29",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man’s First Journey to the Moon",
"author": "Robert Kurson",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/rocket-men/"
}
],
"description": "NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The riveting inside story of three heroic astronauts who took on the challenge of mankind’s historic first mission to the Moon, from the bestselling author of Shadow Divers. “Robert Kurson tells the tale of Apollo 8 with novelistic detail and immediacy.”—Andy Weir, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Martian and Artemis By August 1968, the American space program was in danger of failing in its two most important objectives: to land a man on the Moon by President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline, and to triumph over the Soviets in space. With its back against the wall, NASA made an almost unimaginable leap: It would scrap its usual methodical approach and risk everything on a sudden launch, sending the first men in history to the Moon—in just four months. And it would all happen at Christmas. In a year of historic violence and discord—the Tet Offensive, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert Kennedy, the riots at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago—the Apollo 8 mission would be the boldest, riskiest test of America’s greatness under pressure. In this gripping insider account, Robert Kurson puts the focus on the three astronauts and their families: the commander, Frank Borman, a conflicted man on his final mission; idealistic Jim Lovell, who’d dreamed since boyhood of riding a rocket to the Moon; and Bill Anders, a young nuclear engineer and hotshot fighter pilot making his first space flight. Drawn from hundreds of hours of one-on-one interviews with the astronauts, their loved ones, NASA personnel, and myriad experts, and filled with vivid and unforgettable detail, Rocket Men is the definitive account of one of America’s finest hours. In this real-life thriller, Kurson reveals the epic dangers involved, and the singular bravery it took, for mankind to leave Earth for the first time—and arrive at a new world. “Rocket Men is a riveting introduction to the [Apollo 8] flight. . . . Kurson details the mission in crisp, suspenseful scenes. . . . [A] gripping book.”—The New York Times Book Review",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=nKorDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Aeronautical Engineering"
],
"isbn_13": "9780812988727",
"pub_date": "2018-04-03",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Bug Lab for Kids: Family-Friendly Activities for Exploring the Amazing World of Beetles, Butterflies, Spiders, and Other Arthropods",
"author": "John W. Guyton",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/bug-lab-for-kids/"
}
],
"description": "Your bug adventure starts here! Bug Lab for Kids is a collection of more than 40 fun activities for exploring the exciting world of arthropods, which makes up more than 90 percent of all animals on earth, including insects, spiders, centipedes, butterflies, bees, ants, and many others! Written by entomologist and educator Dr. John W. Guyton, this fascinating and informative book teaches young bug enthusiasts how to find, interact with, and collect arthropods safely. Begin Your Adventure. Learn how to dress to collect, start a field notebook, and use the scientific method, as well as the best places to look for bugs. Also, make and use an insect net, collecting jars, pitfall traps, and more, and investigate how to care for live arthropods. Preserving Insects. Find out the best ways to photograph insects, make a spreading board, and pin insects. The Most Common Insect Orders. Explore Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (flies and mosquitos), Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), and many more. Other Arthropods. Conduct experiments with centipedes and millipedes, sow bugs and pill bugs, granddaddy longlegs, and others. Creative Projects. Re-create a paper wasp's nest with papier-mache, make a pitcher plant and fly game, and set up a butterfly watering station. Butterflies, Bees & Other Pollinators. Learn how to rear butterflies and explore their migration patterns, conduct a local survey of pollinators, host a honey tasting, and make a pollinator habitat. Turn a fascination for bugs into a love of science and nature with Bug Lab for Kids! The popular Lab for Kids series features a growing list of books that share hands-on activities and projects on a wide host of topics, including art, astronomy, clay, geology, math, and even how to create your own circus—all authored by established experts in their fields. Each lab contains a complete materials list, clear step-by-step photographs of the process, as well as finished samples. The labs can be used as singular projects or as part of a yearlong curriculum of experiential learning. The activities are open-ended, designed to be explored over and over, often with different results. Geared toward being taught or guided by adults, they are enriching for a range of ages and skill levels. Gain firsthand knowledge on your favorite topic with Lab for Kids.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=7WxgDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Entomology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781631596339",
"pub_date": "2018-06-12",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Itch!: Everything You Didn’t Want to Know about What Makes You Scratch",
"author": "Anita Sanchez",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/itch/"
}
],
"description": "Everybody gets itchy, and every kid will love this title that scratches the itch to know more and about the history, anatomy, botany, biology behind it. Perfect for fans of Grossology books looking for something more substantive and dynamic. You can feel it coming on--that terrible, tortuous ITCH. As irritating as an itch is, it is also your body's way of sending you a message you can't miss, like you've brushed up against poison ivy or lice have taken up residence in your hair. None of which you'd know without that telltale itch! And there are so many things that make us itch--from fungus to fleas, mosquitoes to nettles, poison ivy to tarantulas! Combining history, anatomy, laugh-out-loud illustrations, and even tips to avoid--and soothe--the itch, Anita Sanchez and Gilbert Ford take readers on an intriguing (and sometimes disgusting) look into what makes you scratch.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=N8NODwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Human Physiology"
],
"isbn_13": "9780544811010",
"pub_date": "2018-03-13",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "What Do They Do with All that Poo?",
"author": "Jane Kurtz",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/12/04/what-do-they-do-with-all-that-poo/"
}
],
"description": "Find out what happens to all of the poo at the zoo in this funny and factual picture book! There are so many different kinds of animals at the zoo, and they each make lots and lots (and sometimes LOTS!) of poo. So what do zoos do with all of that poo? This zany, fact-filled romp explores zoo poo, from cube-shaped wombat poo to white hyena scat, and all of the places it ends up, including in science labs and elephant-poo paper—even backyard gardens!",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=cmBEDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Animal Biology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781481479875",
"pub_date": "2018-06-19",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science",
"author": "Audra J. Wolfe",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/11/27/freedoms-laboratory/"
}
],
"description": "Closing in the present day with a discussion of the 2017 March for Science and the prospects for science and science diplomacy in the Trump era, the book demonstrates the continued hold of Cold War thinking on ideas about science and politics in the United States.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=t0bzDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"History of science"
],
"isbn_13": "9781421439082",
"pub_date": "2020-08-04",
"pub_year": "2020"
},
{
"title": "In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World",
"author": "Lauren E. Oakes",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/11/20/in-search-of-the-canary-tree/"
}
],
"description": "The award-winning and surprisingly hopeful story of one woman's search for resiliency in a warming world Several years ago, ecologist Lauren E. Oakes set out from California for Alaska's old-growth forests to hunt for a dying tree: the yellow-cedar. With climate change as the culprit, the death of this species meant loss for many Alaskans. Oakes and her research team wanted to chronicle how plants and people could cope with their rapidly changing world. Amidst the standing dead, she discovered the resiliency of forgotten forests, flourishing again in the wake of destruction, and a diverse community of people who persevered to create new relationships with the emerging environment. Eloquent, insightful, and deeply heartening, In Search of the Canary Tree is a case for hope in a warming world.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=PWxSDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Ecology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781541617421",
"pub_date": "2018-11-27",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "The Cell: A Visual Tour of the Building Block of Life",
"author": "Jack Challoner",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/12/05/microscopic-elements-of-mammalian-anatomy-shine-in-a-visual-guide-to-cell-biology/"
}
],
"description": "The cell is the basic building block of life. In its 3.5 billion years on the planet, it has proven to be a powerhouse, spreading life first throughout the seas, then across land, developing the rich and complex diversity of life that populates the planet today. With The Cell: A Visual Tour of the Building Block of Life, Jack Challoner treats readers to a visually stunning tour of these remarkable molecular machines. Most of the living things we’re familiar with—the plants in our gardens, the animals we eat—are composed of billions or trillions of cells. Most multicellular organisms consist of many different types of cells, each highly specialized to play a particular role—from building bones or producing the pigment in flower petals to fighting disease or sensing environmental cues. But the great majority of living things on our planet exist as single cell. These cellular singletons are every bit as successful and diverse as multicellular organisms, and our very existence relies on them. The book is an authoritative yet accessible account of what goes on inside every living cell—from building proteins and producing energy to making identical copies of themselves—and the importance of these chemical reactions both on the familiar everyday scale and on the global scale. Along the way, Challoner sheds light on many of the most intriguing questions guiding current scientific research: What special properties make stem cells so promising in the treatment of injury and disease? How and when did single-celled organisms first come together to form multicellular ones? And how might scientists soon be prepared to build on the basic principles of cell biology to build similar living cells from scratch.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=V9UpCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Cell Biology",
"Young Adult",
"Young Readers"
],
"isbn_13": "9780226224183",
"pub_date": "2015-10-16",
"pub_year": "2015"
},
{
"title": "Understanding Health Inequalities and Justice: New Conversations Across the Disciplines",
"author": "Mara Buchbinder",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/11/25/embodied-inequality/"
}
],
"description": "The need for informed analyses of health policy is now greater than ever. The twelve essays in this volume show that public debates routinely bypass complex ethical, sociocultural, historical, and political questions about how we should address ideals of justice and equality in health care. Integrating perspectives from the humanities, social sciences, medicine, and public health, this volume illuminates the relationships between justice and health inequalities to enrich debates. Understanding Health Inequalities and Justice explores three questions: How do scholars approach relations between health inequalities and ideals of justice? When do justice considerations inform solutions to health inequalities, and how do specific health inequalities affect perceptions of injustice? And how can diverse scholarly approaches contribute to better health policy? From addressing patient agency in an inequitable health care environment to examining how scholars of social justice and health care amass evidence, this volume promotes a richer understanding of health and justice and how to achieve both. The contributors are Judith C. Barker, Paula Braveman, Paul Brodwin, Jami Suki Chang, Debra DeBruin, Leslie A. Dubbin, Sarah Horton, Carla C. Keirns, J. Paul Kelleher, Nicholas B. King, Eva Feder Kittay, Joan Liaschenko, Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Mary Faith Marshall, Carolyn Moxley Rouse, Jennifer Prah Ruger, and Janet K. Shim.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=PacwDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Inequality",
"Public Health",
"Social Justice"
],
"isbn_13": "9781469630366",
"pub_date": "2016-09-19",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations, and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life",
"author": "Jonathan F. P. Rose",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/10/28/striking-right-chord/"
}
],
"description": "2017 PROSE Award Winner: Outstanding Scholarly Work by a Trade Publisher In the vein of Jane Jacobs’s The Death and Life of Great American Cities and Edward Glaeser’s Triumph of the City, Jonathan F. P. Rose—a visionary in urban development and renewal—champions the role of cities in addressing the environmental, economic, and social challenges of the twenty-first century. Cities are birthplaces of civilization; centers of culture, trade, and progress; cauldrons of opportunity—and the home of eighty percent of the world’s population by 2050. As the 21st century progresses, metropolitan areas will bear the brunt of global megatrends such as climate change, natural resource depletion, population growth, income inequality, mass migrations, education and health disparities, among many others. In The Well-Tempered City, Jonathan F. P. Rose—the man who “repairs the fabric of cities”—distills a lifetime of interdisciplinary research and firsthand experience into a five-pronged model for how to design and reshape our cities with the goal of equalizing their landscape of opportunity. Drawing from the musical concept of “temperament” as a way to achieve harmony, Rose argues that well-tempered cities can be infused with systems that bend the arc of their development toward equality, resilience, adaptability, well-being, and the ever-unfolding harmony between civilization and nature. These goals may never be fully achieved, but our cities will be richer and happier if we aspire to them, and if we infuse our every plan and constructive step with this intention. A celebration of the city and an impassioned argument for its role in addressing the important issues in these volatile times, The Well-Tempered City is a reasoned, hopeful blueprint for a thriving metropolis—and the future.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=VvU8CwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Inequality",
"Social Justice",
"Sustainability",
"Urban Planning",
"Urbanization"
],
"isbn_13": "9780062234742",
"pub_date": "2016-09-13",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "The Aliens Are Coming! The Extraordinary Science Behind Our Search for Life in the Universe",
"author": "Ben Miller",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/10/27/anyone-out-there-a-witty-romp-through-the-cosmos-explores-search-for-alien-life/"
}
],
"description": "Discover the fascinating and cutting-edge science behind the greatest question of all: is there life beyond Earth? For millennia, we have looked up at the stars and wondered whether we are alone in the universe. In the last few years, scientists have made huge strides towards answering that question. In The Aliens are Coming!, comedian and bestselling science writer Ben Miller takes us on a fantastic voyage of discovery, from the beginnings of life on earth to the very latest search for alien intelligence. What soon becomes clear is that the hunt for extra-terrestrials is also an exploration of what we actually mean by life. What do you need to kickstart life? How did the teeming energy of the Big Bang end up as frogs, trees and quantity surveyors? How can evolution provide clues about alien life? What might it look like? (Probably not green and sexy, sadly.) As our probes and manned missions venture out into the solar system, and our telescopes image Earth-like planets with ever-increasing accuracy, our search for alien life has never been more exciting - or better funded. The Aliens are Coming! is a comprehensive, accessible and hugely entertaining guide to that search, and our quest to understand the very nature of life itself.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=iTQ9CgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Astronomy",
"Cosmology",
"Planetary Studies"
],
"isbn_13": "9780748128518",
"pub_date": "2016-02-04",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe",
"author": "Roger Penrose",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/10/07/the-folly-of-fashionable-thinking/"
}
],
"description": "One of the world's leading physicists questions some of the most fashionable ideas in physics today, including string theory What can fashionable ideas, blind faith, or pure fantasy possibly have to do with the scientific quest to understand the universe? Surely, theoretical physicists are immune to mere trends, dogmatic beliefs, or flights of fancy? In fact, acclaimed physicist and bestselling author Roger Penrose argues that researchers working at the extreme frontiers of physics are just as susceptible to these forces as anyone else. In this provocative book, he argues that fashion, faith, and fantasy, while sometimes productive and even essential in physics, may be leading today's researchers astray in three of the field's most important areas—string theory, quantum mechanics, and cosmology. Arguing that string theory has veered away from physical reality by positing six extra hidden dimensions, Penrose cautions that the fashionable nature of a theory can cloud our judgment of its plausibility. In the case of quantum mechanics, its stunning success in explaining the atomic universe has led to an uncritical faith that it must also apply to reasonably massive objects, and Penrose responds by suggesting possible changes in quantum theory. Turning to cosmology, he argues that most of the current fantastical ideas about the origins of the universe cannot be true, but that an even wilder reality may lie behind them. Finally, Penrose describes how fashion, faith, and fantasy have ironically also shaped his own work, from twistor theory, a possible alternative to string theory that is beginning to acquire a fashionable status, to \"conformal cyclic cosmology,\" an idea so fantastic that it could be called \"conformal crazy cosmology.\" The result is an important critique of some of the most significant developments in physics today from one of its most eminent figures.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=9XKYDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Cosmology",
"Physics"
],
"isbn_13": "9780691178530",
"pub_date": "2017-09-05",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Now: The Physics of Time",
"author": "Richard A. Muller",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/30/rethinking-the-arrow-of-time/"
}
],
"description": "You are reading the word \"now\" right now. But what does that mean? What makes the ephemeral moment \"now\" so special? Its enigmatic character has bedeviled philosophers, priests, and modern-day physicists from Augustine to Einstein and beyond. Einstein showed that the flow of time is affected by both velocity and gravity, yet he despaired at his failure to explain the meaning of \"now.\" Equally puzzling: why does time flow? Some physicists have given up trying to understand, and call the flow of time an illusion, but the eminent experimentalist physicist Richard A. Muller protests. He says physics should explain reality, not deny it. InNow, Muller does more than poke holes in past ideas; he crafts his own revolutionary theory, one that makes testable predictions. He begins by laying out--with the refreshing clarity that made Physics for Future Presidents so successful--a firm and remarkably clear explanation of the physics building blocks of his theory: relativity, entropy, entanglement, antimatter, and the Big Bang. With the stage then set, he reveals a startling way forward. Muller's monumental work will spark major debate about the most fundamental assumptions of our universe, and may crack one of physics's longest-standing enigmas",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=tTZNMQAACAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Philosophy",
"Physics"
],
"isbn_13": "0393354814",
"pub_date": "2017-09-19",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction",
"author": "Mary Ellen Hannibal",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/citizen-scientist/"
}
],
"description": "A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2016: “Intelligent and impassioned, Citizen Scientist is essential reading for anyone interested in the natural world.” Award-winning writer Mary Ellen Hannibal has long reported on scientists’ efforts to protect vanishing species, but it was only through citizen science that she found she could take action herself. As she wades into tide pools, spots hawks, and scours mountains, she discovers the power of the heroic volunteers who are helping scientists measure—and even slow—today’s unprecedented mass extinction. Citizen science may be the future of large-scale field research—and our planet’s last, best hope.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=iyg6DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Conservation"
],
"isbn_13": "9781615193981",
"pub_date": "2017-08-22",
"pub_year": "2017"
},
{
"title": "A Life Everlasting: The Extraordinary Story of One Boy's Gift to Medical Science",
"author": "Sarah Gray",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/a-life-everlasting/"
}
],
"description": "A donor mother’s powerful memoir of grief and rebirth that is also a fascinating medical science whodunit, taking us inside the world of organ, eye, tissue, and blood donation and cutting-edge scientific research. When Sarah Gray received the devastating news that her unborn son Thomas was diagnosed with anencephaly, a terminal condition, she decided she wanted his death—and life—to have meaning. In the weeks before she gave birth to her twin sons in 2010, she arranged to donate Thomas’s organs. Due to his low birth weight, they would go to research rather than transplant. As transplant donors have the opportunity to meet recipients, Sarah wanted to know how Thomas's donation would be used. That curiosity fueled a scientific odyssey that leads Sarah to some of the most prestigious scientific facilities in the country, including Harvard, Duke, and the University of Pennsylvania. Pulling back the curtain of protocol and confidentiality, she introduces the researchers who received Thomas’s donations, held his liver in their hands, studied his cells under the microscope. Sarah’s journey to find solace and understanding takes her beyond her son’s donations—offering a breathtaking overview of the world of medical research and the valiant scientists on the horizon of discovery. She goes behind the scenes at organ procurement organizations, introducing skilled technicians for whom death means saving lives, empathetic counselors, and the brilliant minds who are finding surprising and inventive ways to treat and cure disease through these donations. She also shares the moving stories of other donor families. A Life Everlasting is an unforgettable testament to hope, a tribute to life and discovery, and a portrait of unsung heroes pushing the boundaries of medical science for the benefit of all humanity.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=0K1QCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Medicine"
],
"isbn_13": "9780062438249",
"pub_date": "2016-09-27",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Chickenizing Farms and Food: How Industrial Meat Production Endangers Workers, Animals, and Consumers",
"author": "Ellen K. Silbergeld",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/chickenizing-farms-and-food/"
}
],
"description": "Over the past century, new farming methods, feed additives, and social and economic structures have radically transformed agriculture around the globe, often at the expense of human health. In Chickenizing Farms and Food, Ellen K. Silbergeld reveals the unsafe world of chickenization—big agriculture’s top-down, contract-based factory farming system—and its negative consequences for workers, consumers, and the environment. Drawing on her deep knowledge of and experience in environmental engineering and toxicology, Silbergeld examines the complex history of the modern industrial food animal production industry and describes the widespread effects of Arthur Perdue’s remarkable agricultural innovations, which were so important that the US Department of Agriculture uses the term chickenization to cover the transformation of all farm animal production. Silbergeld tells the real story of how antibiotics were first introduced into animal feeds in the 1940s, which has led to the emergence of multi-drug-resistant pathogens, such as MRSA. Along the way, she talks with poultry growers, farmers, and slaughterhouse workers on the front lines of exposure, moving from the Chesapeake Bay peninsula that gave birth to the modern livestock and poultry industry to North Carolina, Brazil, and China. Arguing that the agricultural industry is in desperate need of reform, the book searches through the fog of illusion that obscures most of what has happened to agriculture in the twentieth century and untangles the history of how laws, regulations, and policies have stripped government agencies of the power to protect workers and consumers alike from occupational and food-borne hazards. Chickenizing Farms and Food also explores the limits of some popular alternatives to industrial farming, including organic production, nonmeat diets, locavorism, and small-scale agriculture. Silbergeld’s provocative but pragmatic call to action is tempered by real challenges: how can we ensure a safe and accessible food system that can feed everyone, including consumers in developing countries with new tastes for western diets, without hurting workers, sickening consumers, and undermining some of our most powerful medicines?",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=YkbVDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Agriculture",
"Food"
],
"isbn_13": "9781421420318",
"pub_date": "2016-10-04",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "\tThe Cure for Catastrophe",
"author": "Robert Muir-Wood",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2016/09/09/the-cure-for-catastrophe/"
}
],
"description": "Hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, typhoons – we watch in horror before springing into action with aid and support, shocked again and again by the destructive power of the earth. Except these disasters aren’t only the earth’s doing, they are ours too. Why did no one consider that a tsunami could disable the nuclear power plants in Fukushima? Why did so many die when Katrina flooded New Orleans? Not so long ago we could only focus on rescuing and sheltering survivors – now we can anticipate many natural disasters and plan for them. In dozens of cities around the world, we’re able to identify the specific buildings that will be shaken apart, blown down or reduced to rubble. Yet every year, thanks to politics and inertia, we fail to act. Traversing continents and history, Robert Muir-Wood blends gripping storytelling with scientific insights to detail our efforts to tame the most extreme forces of nature. At the frontlines, the predictive powers of new technologies mean we can foresee a future where there is an end to the pain and destruction wrought by these devastating cataclysms. As The Cure for Catastrophe makes clear, we have an extraordinary opportunity before us – to make the decisions about what we build, where we live and how warnings are communicated that could save millions of lives.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=8h29DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Natural hazards"
],
"isbn_13": "9781786070067",
"pub_date": "2016-09-01",
"pub_year": "2016"
},
{
"title": "Testosterone: An Unauthorized Biography",
"author": "Rebecca M. Jordan-Young",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/10/29/testosterone-an-unauthorized-biography/"
},
{
"source": "Nature",
"url": "https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03080-8"
}
],
"description": "Testosterone is neither the biological essence of manliness nor even the \"male sex hormone.\" It doesn't predict competitiveness or aggressiveness, strength or sex drive. Rebecca Jordan-Young and Katrina Karkazis pry testosterone loose from more than a century of misconceptions that undermine science while making social fables seem scientific.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=efuwDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780674725324",
"pub_date": "2019",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "How to Grow a Human: Adventures in How We Are Made and Who We Are",
"author": "Philip Ball",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/10/28/how-to-grow-a-human/"
}
],
"description": "The bestselling author of Critical Mass offers a cutting-edge examination of what it means to be human in the face of the latest technical developments and research in cell biology, tissue growth, organ regeneration, and treatments of cancer and dementia.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=N_uwDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780226654805",
"pub_date": "2019",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Ahab’s Rolling Sea: A Natural History of Moby-Dick",
"author": "Richard J. King",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/10/24/ahabs-rolling-sea/"
}
],
"description": "Although Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick is beloved as one of the most profound and enduring works of American fiction, we rarely consider it a work of nature writing—or even a novel of the sea. Yet Pulitzer Prize–winning author Annie Dillard avers Moby-Dick is the “best book ever written about nature,” and nearly the entirety of the story is set on the waves, with scarcely a whiff of land. In fact, Ishmael’s sea yarn is in conversation with the nature writing of Emerson and Thoreau, and Melville himself did much more than live for a year in a cabin beside a pond. He set sail: to the far remote Pacific Ocean, spending more than three years at sea before writing his masterpiece in 1851. A revelation for Moby-Dick devotees and neophytes alike, Ahab’s Rolling Sea is a chronological journey through the natural history of Melville’s novel. From white whales to whale intelligence, giant squids, barnacles, albatross, and sharks, Richard J. King examines what Melville knew from his own experiences and the sources available to a reader in the mid-1800s, exploring how and why Melville might have twisted what was known to serve his fiction. King then climbs to the crow’s nest, setting Melville in the context of the American perception of the ocean in 1851—at the very start of the Industrial Revolution and just before the publication of On the Origin of Species. King compares Ahab’s and Ishmael’s worldviews to how we see the ocean today: an expanse still immortal and sublime, but also in crisis. And although the concept of stewardship of the sea would have been entirely foreign, if not absurd, to Melville, King argues that Melville’s narrator Ishmael reveals his own tendencies toward what we would now call environmentalism. Featuring a coffer of illustrations and an array of interviews with contemporary scientists, fishers, and whale watch operators, Ahab’s Rolling Sea offers new insight not only into a cherished masterwork and its author but also into our evolving relationship with the briny deep—from whale hunters to climate refugees.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=D0C3DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780226514963",
"pub_date": "2019-11-11",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Narrative Economics: How Stories Go Viral and Drive Major Economic Events",
"author": "Robert J. Shiller",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/10/16/narrative-economics/"
},
{
"source": "Nature",
"url": "https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03081-7"
}
],
"description": "\"Economists have long based their forecasts on financial aggregates such as price-earnings ratios, asset prices, and exchange rate fluctuations, and used them to produce statistically informed speculations about the future--with limited success. Robert Shiller employs such aggregates in his own forecasts, but has famously complemented them with observations about the influence of mass psychology on certain events. This approach has come to be known as behavioral economics. How can economists effectively capture the effects of psychology and its influence on economic events and change? Shiller attempts to help us better understand how psychology affects events by explaining how popular economic stories arise, how they grow viral, and ultimately how they drive economic developments. After defining narrative economics in the book's preface with allusions to the advent of both the Great Depression and to World War II, Shiller presents an example of a recent economic narrative gone viral in the story of Bitcoin. Next, he explains how narrative economics works with reference to how other disciplines incorporate narrative into their analyses and also to how epidemiology explains how disease goes viral. He then presents accounts of recurring economic narratives, including the gold standard, real estate booms, war and depression, and stock market booms and crashes. He ends his book with a blueprint for future research by economists on narrative economics\"--",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=HciXDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780691182292",
"pub_date": "2019-10",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Golden Rice: The Imperiled Birth of a GMO Superfood",
"author": "Ed Regis",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/10/08/golden-rice/"
}
],
"description": "Anyone interested in GMOs, social justice, or world hunger will find Golden Rice a compelling, sad, and maddening true-life science tale.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=VxytDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781421433035",
"pub_date": "2019-10-08",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "What is Life?",
"author": "Erwin Schrodinger",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/10/01/what-is-life/"
}
],
"description": "\"What Is Life?\" is Nobel laureate Erwin Schrödinger's exploration of the question which lies at the heart of biology. His essay, \"Mind and Matter,\" investigates what place consciousness occupies in the evolution of life, and what part the state of development of the human mind plays in moral questions. \"Autobiographical Sketches\" offers a fascinating fragmentary account of his life as a background to his scientific writings.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=hP9-WIEyv8cC&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9781107604667",
"pub_date": "2012-03-26",
"pub_year": "2012"
},
{
"title": "Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing",
"author": "Françoise Baylis",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/30/altered-inheritance/"
}
],
"description": "With the advent of CRISPR gene-editing technology, designer babies have become a reality. Françoise Baylis insists that scientists alone cannot decide the terms of this new era in human evolution. Members of the public, with diverse interests and perspectives, must have a role in determining our future as a species.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=GTGtDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780674976719",
"pub_date": "2019-09-17",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Mobilizing Mutations: Human Genetics in the Age of Patient Advocacy",
"author": "Daniel Navon",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/09/26/mobilizing-mutations/"
}
],
"description": "With every passing year, more and more people learn that they or their young or unborn children carries a genetic mutation. But what does this mean for the way we understand a person? Today, genetic mutations are being used to diagnose novel conditions like the XYY, Fragile X, NGLY1 mutation, and 22q11.2 Deletion syndromes, carving out rich new categories of human disease and difference. Daniel Navon calls this form of categorization “genomic designation,” and in Mobilizing Mutations he shows how mutations, and the social factors that surround them, are reshaping human classification. Drawing on a wealth of fieldwork and historical material, Navon presents a sociological account of the ways genetic mutations have been mobilized and transformed in the sixty years since it became possible to see abnormal human genomes, providing a new vista onto the myriad ways contemporary genetic testing can transform people’s lives. Taking us inside these shifting worlds of research and advocacy over the last half century, Navon reveals the ways in which knowledge about genetic mutations can redefine what it means to be ill, different, and ultimately, human.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=wfuwDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [],
"isbn_13": "9780226638126",
"pub_date": "2019-09-20",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Superhuman: Life at the Extremes of Our Capacity",
"author": "Rowan Hooper",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/09/11/superhuman/"
}
],
"description": "From evolutionary biologist Rowan Hooper, an awe-inspiring look into the extremes of human ability—and what they tell us about our own potential—“an intriguing…look at some of the things that make us human—and more” (Kirkus Reviews). In 1997, an endurance runner named Yiannis Kouros ran 188 miles in twenty-four hours. Akira Haraguchi can recite pi to the 100,000th decimal point. John Nunn was accepted to Oxford University at age fifteen. After a horrific attack by her estranged husband, Carmen Tarleton was left with burns to more than eighty percent of her body. After a three-month coma, multiple skin grafts, and successful face transplant, Tarleton is now a motivational speaker. What does it feel like to be exceptional? And what does it take to get there? Why can some people achieve greatness when others can’t, no matter how hard they try? Just how much potential does our species have? Evolutionary biologist Rowan Hooper has the answers. In Superhuman he takes us on a breathtaking tour of the peaks of human achievement that shows us what it feels like to be extraordinary—and what it takes to get there. Drawing on interviews with these “superhumans” and those who have studied them, Hooper assesses the science and genetics of peak potential. His case studies are as inspirational as they are varied, highlighting feats of endurance, strength, intelligence, and memory. Superhuman is “terrifically entertaining. Hooper is that precious thing; an easy, fluent, and funny scientist. The message from this upbeat, clever, feel good book is that we all have greater capacity than we realize. Spectacularly enjoyable” (The London Times), this is a fascinating, eye-opening, and inspiring celebration for anyone who ever felt that they might be able to do something extraordinary in life, for those who simply want to succeed, and for anyone interested in the sublime possibilities of humankind.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=jU6qDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Human Physiology"
],
"isbn_13": "9781501168734",
"pub_date": "2019-09-17",
"pub_year": "2019"
},
{
"title": "Vaquita: Science, Politics, and Crime in the Sea of Cortez",
"author": "Brooke Bessesen",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/09/04/vaquita/"
}
],
"description": "In 2006, vaquita, a diminutive porpoise making its home in the Upper Gulf of California, inherited the dubious title of world's most endangered marine mammal. Vaquita have been in decline for decades, dying in illegal gillnets intended for a giant fish, totoaba. Author Brooke Bessesen takes us to the Upper Gulf region in search of answers to a heart-wrenching dilemma. When diplomatic efforts to save the porpoise failed, Bessesen followed a scientific team in a binational effort to capture remaining vaquita and breed them in captivity--the only hope for their survival. In this fast-paced, soul-searing tale, she learned that there are no easy answers when extinction is profitable.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=XeFdDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Marine Conservation"
],
"isbn_13": "9781610919319",
"pub_date": "2018-09-11",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "The New Mind Readers: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal About Our Thoughts",
"author": "Russell A. Poldrack",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/09/04/the-new-mind-readers/"
}
],
"description": "A revealing insider's account of the power—and limitations—of functional MRI The ability to read minds has long been a fascination of science fiction, but revolutionary new brain-imaging methods are bringing it closer to scientific reality. The New Mind Readers looks at the origins, development, and future of these extraordinary tools, revealing how they are increasingly being used to decode our thoughts and experiences—and how this raises sometimes troubling questions about their application in domains such as marketing, politics, and the law. Written by one of the world's leading pioneers in cognitive neuroscience, this book offers needed perspective on what these emerging methods can and cannot do, and demonstrates how they can provide answers to age-old questions about the nature of consciousness and what it means to be human.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=jUXcDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Neuroscience"
],
"isbn_13": "9780691208985",
"pub_date": "2020-10-06",
"pub_year": "2020"
},
{
"title": "Accessory to War: The Unspoken Alliance Between Astrophysics and the Military",
"author": "Neil deGrasse Tyson",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/09/04/accessory-to-war/"
}
],
"description": "“Extraordinary.… A feast of history, an expert tour through thousands of years of war and conquest.” —Jennifer Carson, New York Times Book Review In this far-reaching foray into the millennia-long relationship between science and military power, acclaimed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-author Avis Lang examine how the methods and tools of astrophysics have been enlisted in the service of war. Spanning early celestial navigation to satellite-enabled warfare, Accessory to War is a richly researched and provocative examination of the intersection of science, technology, industry, and power that will introduce Tyson’s millions of fans to yet another dimension of how the universe has shaped our lives and our world.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=-WRSDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Astrophysics",
"Military Science"
],
"isbn_13": "9780393285437",
"pub_date": "2018-09-11",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "The Autobiography of a Transgender Scientist",
"author": "Ben Barres",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/09/04/the-autobiography-of-a-transgender-scientist/"
}
],
"description": "A leading scientist describes his life, his gender transition, his scientific work, and his advocacy for gender equality in science. Ben Barres was known for his groundbreaking scientific work and for his groundbreaking advocacy for gender equality in science. In this book, completed shortly before his death from pancreatic cancer in December 2017, Barres (born in 1954) describes a life full of remarkable accomplishments--from his childhood as a precocious math and science whiz to his experiences as a female student at MIT in the 1970s to his female-to-male transition in his forties, to his scientific work and role as teacher and mentor at Stanford. Barres recounts his early life--his interest in science, first manifested as a fascination with the mad scientist in Superman; his academic successes; and his gender confusion. Barres felt even as a very young child that he was assigned the wrong gender. After years of being acutely uncomfortable in his own skin, Barres transitioned from female to male. He reports he felt nothing but relief on becoming his true self. He was proud to be a role model for transgender scientists. As an undergraduate at MIT, Barres experienced discrimination, but it was after transitioning that he realized how differently male and female scientists are treated. He became an advocate for gender equality in science, and later in life responded pointedly to Larry Summers's speculation that women were innately unsuited to be scientists. Privileged white men, Barres writes, \"miss the basic point that in the face of negative stereotyping, talented women will not be recognized.\" At Stanford, Barres made important discoveries about glia, the most numerous cells in the brain, and he describes some of his work. \"The most rewarding part of his job,\" however, was mentoring young scientists. That, and his advocacy for women and transgender scientists, ensures his legacy.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=uIf-DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Neuroscience",
"Science lives"
],
"isbn_13": "9780262539548",
"pub_date": "2020-09",
"pub_year": "2020"
},
{
"title": "Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms",
"author": "Hannah Fry",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/09/04/hello-world/"
}
],
"description": "‘One of the best books yet written on data and algorithms. . .deserves a place on the bestseller charts.’ (The Times) You are accused of a crime. Who would you rather determined your fate – a human or an algorithm? An algorithm is more consistent and less prone to error of judgement. Yet a human can look you in the eye before passing sentence. Welcome to the age of the algorithm, the story of a not-too-distant future where machines rule supreme, making important decisions – in healthcare, transport, finance, security, what we watch, where we go even who we send to prison. So how much should we rely on them? What kind of future do we want? Hannah Fry takes us on a tour of the good, the bad and the downright ugly of the algorithms that surround us. In Hello World she lifts the lid on their inner workings, demonstrates their power, exposes their limitations, and examines whether they really are an improvement on the humans they are replacing. A BBC RADIO 4: BOOK OF THE WEEK SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2018 BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE AND 2018 ROYAL SOCIETY SCIENCE BOOK PRIZE",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=72FCDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Computer science"
],
"isbn_13": "9781473544710",
"pub_date": "2018-09-06",
"pub_year": "2018"
},
{
"title": "Underbug: An Obsessive Tale of Termites and Technology",
"author": "Lisa Margonelli",
"reviews": [
{
"source": "Science",
"url": "blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2018/09/04/underbug/"
}
],
"description": "Who has the answer to the world's fuel problems? How can we bring ruined land back to life? Where do roboticists turn when they try to engineer a hive mind? Termites. Strange though it seems, scientists look to tiny termites for answers to some big ideas. Lisa Margonelli tracks them, deep into their mounds to find out how termites can change the world. Underbug: An Obsessive Tale of Termites and Technology touches on everything from meditation, innovation and the psychology of obsession to good old-fashioned biology.",
"cover_url": "http://books.google.com/books/content?id=eh69DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&edge=curl&source=gbs_api",
"isbn": "",
"tags": [
"Artificial intelligence",
"Entomology",
"Robotics"
],
"isbn_13": "9781786071910",
"p