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RobertTalbert / MTH325_Fall2015.md
Last active Aug 7, 2019
Syllabus for MTH 325 (Discrete Structures for Computer Science 2) Section 01 at Grand Valley State University, Fall 2015.
View MTH325_Fall2015.md

MTH 325: Discrete Structures for Computer Science 2 -- Fall 2015 Syllabus

Course Information

  • Meetings: MWF 9:00--9:50am in Mackinac Hall A-2-167.
  • Prerequisite: MTH 225.
  • Textbook: Applied Discrete Structures, March 2013 edition by Alan Doerr and Kenneth Levasseur. Available free online at http://applied-discrete-structures.wiki.uml.edu/.
  • Computer requirements: You will need access to a portable computing device such as a laptop, tablet, or smartphone for occasional in-class computer work. Ideally, you should bring your device with you to class each day unless this is a logistical issue. If you do not have access to such a device or cannot bring yours to class on a particular day, the Mathematics Department has loaner devices (Android tablets and Chromebooks) you can use, but you must give the professor at least 24 hours' notice if you intend to use one.
View 750 words of text.md

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RobertTalbert / MTH 225 Big Picture.md
Created Aug 27, 2015
Big Picture assignment items for MTH 225 (Discrete Structures for Computer Science 1).
View MTH 225 Big Picture.md

MTH 225 Big Picture Items

The Big Picture category consists of items that will address the following learning goals of our course:

  • Students will describe the uses of mathematics as a way of knowing in computer science and mathematical proof as a way of establishing knowledge in math and computer science.
  • Students will identify and describe connections between the mathematical content of the course (sets, counting, logic, proof, probability) and the elements of computer science (algorithms, data structures, programs).

Big Picture items can also be used to show that you are thinking carefully about your work (particularly any failures that you encounter while learning) and about the way that you learn.

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / MTH 325 Big Picture items.md
Created Aug 27, 2015
Big Picture assignments for MTH 325, Discrete Structures for Computer Science 2.
View MTH 325 Big Picture items.md

MTH 325 Big Picture Items

The Big Picture category consists of items that will address the following learning goals of our course:

  • Students will describe the uses of mathematics as a way of knowing in computer science and mathematical proof as a way of establishing knowledge in math and computer science.
  • Students will identify and describe connections between the mathematical content of the course (relations, functions, recursion, graphs, trees) and the elements of computer science (algorithms, data structures, programs).

Big Picture items can also be used to show that you are thinking carefully about your work (particularly any failures that you encounter while learning) and about the way that you learn.

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / Graph coloring interact.py
Created Oct 2, 2015
Sage code for creating an interactive element for determining chromatic number of famous graphs.
View Graph coloring interact.py
from sage.graphs.graph_coloring import *
@interact
def _(graph=['Cycle Graph', 'Wheel Graph', 'Complete Graph', 'Cube Graph', 'Random'],
n = selector([1..10], nrows = 1), p = selector([10,20,..,100], nrows = 1)):
print graph
if graph == 'Wheel Graph':
print "n = %s (number of vertices)"%n
G = graphs.WheelGraph(n)
elif graph == 'Cycle Graph':
print "n = %s (number of vertices)"%n
@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / bitwiseXOR.md
Last active Oct 14, 2015
Example of bitwise XOR encryption
View bitwiseXOR.md

This is an example of how the bitwise XOR can be used to make a simple encryption system.

Suppose Alice wants to send the message CAT to Bob using the key 11000101.

First: Convert the characters in the message to ASCII:

  • C = 01000011
  • A = 01000001
  • T = 01010100
@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / 2015-10-13-my-current-approach-to-assessment-in-specs-grading.md
Created Oct 15, 2015
My current approach to assessment in specs grading (Casting Out Nines in exile)
View 2015-10-13-my-current-approach-to-assessment-in-specs-grading.md

This post is really an extended answer to a question that came up on Twitter today among some of my standards-based grading people about finding a balance between being thorough about assessing student work on learning objectives on the one hand, and not being crushed by the grading workload on the other hand:

.@RobertTalbert Using SBG in my calc classes this term, mostly liking it. However, grading load has become unsustainable (~60 Ss). Advice?

— Spencer Bagley (@sbagley) October 13, 2015
<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

SBG is based on having a list of micro-scale, atomic learning objectives for the course, and students progress through the course by providing evidence that they have mastered each objectives. [Some of these lists can contain dozens of learn

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / 2015-10-15-what-we-can-learn-from-the-trades-and-professions.md
Created Oct 15, 2015
Casting Out Nines: What we can learn from the trades and professions
View 2015-10-15-what-we-can-learn-from-the-trades-and-professions.md

I am currently en route to Allentown, PA where tomorrow I will be facilitating a workshop on flipped learning. If it seems like I've been doing this a lot lately... this is the third weekend in a row I've been out for speaking or workshop engagements. This much travel in such a compressed period of time can be tiring (and I won't even mention how far behind I have gotten in prepping and grading for my actual classes). However, I do enjoy meeting new people and talking about flipped learning and technology with groups that I would not ordinarily hang out with.

That's the case this weekend, where the audience will come primarily from two groups of community college faculty: Faculty from nursing, and faculty from welding and diesel engine technology. They are part of a learning community at a cohort of community colleges in eastern Pennsylvania, which in turn is part of a grant to modernize some of the community college programs in eastern PA to better serve its population, especially those in the

View 2015-10-16-what-i-learned-from-blogging-every-day-for-a-month.md

Back in September, I had a realization: My blogging habits were terrible. And by "terrible" I mean that I didn't actually have any blogging habits at all. I would post something every so often, and then weeks or months would go by with nothing. When the Chronicle of Higher Education shut down the blog network and I had to migrate, I had a choice: I could fold up Casting Out Nines for good and focus my writing elsewhere, or I could press on with blogging on my own. I chose the latter because blogging for me is a way to get my thoughts out in the open, long-form, and create a visible record of the stuff I am thinking about and trying. But the thing is, this only works when I actually post things, which I was not.

So at some point over the weekend of September 18--20, I read some random blog post by somebody else and he had challenged himself to write a blog post every day for a year. I thought, _that's what I need: a challenge

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / hwbfunctions_test.py
Created Oct 20, 2015
Test cases for HWB Functions, problems 1 and 2
View hwbfunctions_test.py
# Function test cases
f1 = {0:[1], 1:[2], 2:[0]} # Is a function
f2 = {0:[1,2], 1:[2], 2:[0]} # Not a function
f3 = {'a': ['c'], 'b':['c'], 'c':['a']} # Is a function
f4 = {'a': ['a'], 'b':['c'], 'c':['a']} # Is a function
f5 = {'a': ['b', 'c'], 'b':['c'], 'c':['a']} # Not a function
f6 = {1:[2], 2:[2]} # Is a function
function_test_cases = [f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6]
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