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@agdelax
Created Oct 16, 2018
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What would you like to do?
Alberto de la Cruz: Bloc Designer Mentor
  1. Hi Student,

    I’m liking the variations that you’re going for in these sketches. Likewise, the logo/brand name brainstorm yielded some really great thoughts on your part on how to interpret the brand’s name. However, this method of developing sketches can actually be detrimental to the process. When designing logos, it’s good to draw them on a white background and keep the orientation consistent. Doing so will help you compare sketches to one another, present and gain feedback easily and keep yourself organized. I’d say your next step should be to start recreating these on white paper in a consistent orientation.

  2. Hi Student,

    Typically, surveys that take less than 5 minutes tend to be most successful. One way to determine this would be to ask a couple friends or family members to fill out this survey while you quietly observe them, keeping note of their completion time and any potential choke points in the survey flow. I would also keep a defined demographic for your survey group, this can increase your user retention for the survey and can lead to much more valuable information for the project. Setting up a “funnel”, where the beginning and end are made up of simpler questions with the more complex questions in the middle, is also a great way to increase engagement. In professional settings, incentives such as rewards are often offered to survey participants, but I wouldn’t worry too much about that in this context.

  3. Hi Student,

    The code you wrote successfully toggles the dropdowns, but currently there’s no way of disabling the other dropdowns. The solution to this is extremely simple, simply add a jQuery hide function for all other dropdowns on each click event. What this will do is make the desired dropdown appear while hiding all other dropdowns, like so:

    $(".setbutton").on("click", function(){
         $("#sub-nav-set").toggle();
         $("#sub-nav-search").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-view").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-new").hide();
     });
     $(".searchbutton").on("click", function(){
         $("#sub-nav-search").toggle();
         $("#sub-nav-set").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-view").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-new").hide();
     });
     $(".viewbutton").on("click", function(){
         $("#sub-nav-view").toggle();
         $("#sub-nav-search").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-set").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-new").hide();
     });
     $(".newbutton").on("click", function(){
         $("#sub-nav-new").toggle();
         $("#sub-nav-set").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-search").hide();
         $("#sub-nav-view").hide();
     });
    
  4. Hi Student,

    This happens all the time! Luckily, fixing merge conflicts is a pretty easy annoyance to fix. In your code you’re gonna find snippets that start with “<<<<<<< HEAD” and ends with ">>>>>>> [other/branch/name]". Inside this is gonna be two sets of code, separated by "=======", these are the actual conflicts. They're gonna look something like this:

    <<<<<<< HEAD
    var red = "redd";
    =======
    var red = "red";
    >>>>>>> master 
    

    All you need to do is decide which of the two conflicting sets of code is the one you want to keep by deleting the unwanted code along with the text that marks the conflicts (“<<<<<<< HEAD”, "=======", ">>>>>>> [other/branch/name]"), like so:

    var red = "red";
    

    From there all you need to do is test the code to make sure it looks the way you want it to then commit.

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