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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" lang="" xml:lang="">
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<meta charset="utf-8" />
<meta name="generator" content="pandoc" />
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, user-scalable=yes" />
<meta name="author" content="Ed Summers" />
<title>Wikidata/Pandoc Example</title>
<style>
code{white-space: pre-wrap;}
span.smallcaps{font-variant: small-caps;}
span.underline{text-decoration: underline;}
div.column{display: inline-block; vertical-align: top; width: 50%;}
</style>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css" />
<!--[if lt IE 9]>
<script src="//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/html5shiv/3.7.3/html5shiv-printshiv.min.js"></script>
<![endif]-->
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<body>
<header id="title-block-header">
<h1 class="title">Wikidata/Pandoc Example</h1>
<p class="author">Ed Summers</p>
</header>
<p>In 1945 Vannevar Bush published an article in <em>The Atlantic</em> called <em>As We May Think</em> <span class="citation" data-cites="Q610709">(Bush 1945)</span>. This article gets cited all the time by information studies researchers for its pie in the sky, daydreaming about the <em>Memex</em> machine.</p>
<p>The Memex was designed to emulate the way the brain links data, or at least how Bush thought the brain links data…but with microfilm (which was the new hotness at the time).</p>
<figure>
<img src="https://i2.wp.com/media.boingboing.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/untitled6.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption>Memex</figcaption>
</figure>
<p>Modeling technical contraptions based on how we think the brain works is an obsession that we still see with us today in the work of artificial intelligence researchers using neural networks. The quest for modeling the brain can even be found in the now ubiquitous von Neumann computational architecture <span class="citation" data-cites="Q72188848">(Chun 2011)</span>.</p>
<p>Three years earlier, Vannevar Bush started another project, which we now know as the Manhattan Project. This project created and deployed the first Atomic Bomb, killing between 129,000 and 226,000 people, most of whom were civilians, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.</p>
<figure>
<img src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8d/Trinity_shot_color.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption>A fiery mushroom cloud lights up the sky</figcaption>
</figure>
<h2 id="references" class="unnumbered">References</h2>
<div id="refs" class="references" role="doc-bibliography">
<div id="ref-Q610709">
<p>Bush, Vannevar. 1945. Review of <em>As We May Think</em>, by Vannevar Bush. <em>The Atlantic</em>.</p>
</div>
<div id="ref-Q72188848">
<p>Chun, Wendy Hui Kyong. 2011. <em>Programmed Visions: Software and Memory</em>. Cambridge, USA: MIT Press.</p>
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title author
Wikidata/Pandoc Example
Ed Summers

In 1945 Vannevar Bush published an article in The Atlantic called As We May Think [@Q610709]. This article gets cited all the time by information studies researchers for its pie in the sky, daydreaming about the Memex machine.

The Memex was designed to emulate the way the brain links data, or at least how Bush thought the brain links data...but with microfilm (which was the new hotness at the time).

Memex

Modeling technical contraptions based on how we think the brain works is an obsession that we still see with us today in the work of artificial intelligence researchers using neural networks. The quest for modeling the brain can even be found in the now ubiquitous von Neumann computational architecture [@Q72188848].

Three years earlier, Vannevar Bush started another project, which we now know as the Manhattan Project. This project created and deployed the first Atomic Bomb, killing between 129,000 and 226,000 people, most of whom were civilians, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

A fiery mushroom cloud lights up the sky

References

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all:
pandoc -F pwcite -F pandoc-citeproc article.md -o article.pdf
pandoc --css style.css --standalone -F pwcite -F pandoc-citeproc article.md -o article.html
body {
margin: 10px 20% 10px 20%;
font-family: "Times New Roman";
font-size: 16pt;
}
img {
width: 80%;
padding: 30px;
}
header {
text-align: center;
padding-bottom: 30px;
}
figure {
border: thin solid #ccc;
padding-bottom: 20px;
margin-top: 10px;
margin-bottom: 10px;
text-align: center;
}
figcaption {
text-align: center;
}
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