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A slightly modified implementation of Ken Perlin's improved noise that allows for tiling the noise arbitrarily.
public class Perlin {
public int repeat;
public Perlin(int repeat = -1) {
this.repeat = repeat;
}
public double OctavePerlin(double x, double y, double z, int octaves, double persistence) {
double total = 0;
double frequency = 1;
double amplitude = 1;
double maxValue = 0; // Used for normalizing result to 0.0 - 1.0
for(int i=0;i<octaves;i++) {
total += perlin(x * frequency, y * frequency, z * frequency) * amplitude;
maxValue += amplitude;
amplitude *= persistence;
frequency *= 2;
}
return total/maxValue;
}
private static readonly int[] permutation = { 151,160,137,91,90,15, // Hash lookup table as defined by Ken Perlin. This is a randomly
131,13,201,95,96,53,194,233,7,225,140,36,103,30,69,142,8,99,37,240,21,10,23, // arranged array of all numbers from 0-255 inclusive.
190, 6,148,247,120,234,75,0,26,197,62,94,252,219,203,117,35,11,32,57,177,33,
88,237,149,56,87,174,20,125,136,171,168, 68,175,74,165,71,134,139,48,27,166,
77,146,158,231,83,111,229,122,60,211,133,230,220,105,92,41,55,46,245,40,244,
102,143,54, 65,25,63,161, 1,216,80,73,209,76,132,187,208, 89,18,169,200,196,
135,130,116,188,159,86,164,100,109,198,173,186, 3,64,52,217,226,250,124,123,
5,202,38,147,118,126,255,82,85,212,207,206,59,227,47,16,58,17,182,189,28,42,
223,183,170,213,119,248,152, 2,44,154,163, 70,221,153,101,155,167, 43,172,9,
129,22,39,253, 19,98,108,110,79,113,224,232,178,185, 112,104,218,246,97,228,
251,34,242,193,238,210,144,12,191,179,162,241, 81,51,145,235,249,14,239,107,
49,192,214, 31,181,199,106,157,184, 84,204,176,115,121,50,45,127, 4,150,254,
138,236,205,93,222,114,67,29,24,72,243,141,128,195,78,66,215,61,156,180
};
private static readonly int[] p; // Doubled permutation to avoid overflow
static Perlin() {
p = new int[512];
for(int x=0;x<512;x++) {
p[x] = permutation[x%256];
}
}
public double perlin(double x, double y, double z) {
if(repeat > 0) { // If we have any repeat on, change the coordinates to their "local" repetitions
x = x%repeat;
y = y%repeat;
z = z%repeat;
}
int xi = (int)x & 255; // Calculate the "unit cube" that the point asked will be located in
int yi = (int)y & 255; // The left bound is ( |_x_|,|_y_|,|_z_| ) and the right bound is that
int zi = (int)z & 255; // plus 1. Next we calculate the location (from 0.0 to 1.0) in that cube.
double xf = x-(int)x; // We also fade the location to smooth the result.
double yf = y-(int)y;i
double zf = z-(int)z;
double u = fade(xf);
double v = fade(yf);
double w = fade(zf);
int aaa, aba, aab, abb, baa, bba, bab, bbb;
aaa = p[p[p[ xi ]+ yi ]+ zi ];
aba = p[p[p[ xi ]+inc(yi)]+ zi ];
aab = p[p[p[ xi ]+ yi ]+inc(zi)];
abb = p[p[p[ xi ]+inc(yi)]+inc(zi)];
baa = p[p[p[inc(xi)]+ yi ]+ zi ];
bba = p[p[p[inc(xi)]+inc(yi)]+ zi ];
bab = p[p[p[inc(xi)]+ yi ]+inc(zi)];
bbb = p[p[p[inc(xi)]+inc(yi)]+inc(zi)];
double x1, x2, y1, y2;
x1 = lerp( grad (aaa, xf , yf , zf), // The gradient function calculates the dot product between a pseudorandom
grad (baa, xf-1, yf , zf), // gradient vector and the vector from the input coordinate to the 8
u); // surrounding points in its unit cube.
x2 = lerp( grad (aba, xf , yf-1, zf), // This is all then lerped together as a sort of weighted average based on the faded (u,v,w)
grad (bba, xf-1, yf-1, zf), // values we made earlier.
u);
y1 = lerp(x1, x2, v);
x1 = lerp( grad (aab, xf , yf , zf-1),
grad (bab, xf-1, yf , zf-1),
u);
x2 = lerp( grad (abb, xf , yf-1, zf-1),
grad (bbb, xf-1, yf-1, zf-1),
u);
y2 = lerp (x1, x2, v);
return (lerp (y1, y2, w)+1)/2; // For convenience we bound it to 0 - 1 (theoretical min/max before is -1 - 1)
}
public int inc(int num) {
num++;
if (repeat > 0) num %= repeat;
return num;
}
public static double grad(int hash, double x, double y, double z) {
int h = hash & 15; // Take the hashed value and take the first 4 bits of it (15 == 0b1111)
double u = h < 8 /* 0b1000 */ ? x : y; // If the most significant bit (MSB) of the hash is 0 then set u = x. Otherwise y.
double v; // In Ken Perlin's original implementation this was another conditional operator (?:). I
// expanded it for readability.
if(h < 4 /* 0b0100 */) // If the first and second significant bits are 0 set v = y
v = y;
else if(h == 12 /* 0b1100 */ || h == 14 /* 0b1110*/)// If the first and second significant bits are 1 set v = x
v = x;
else // If the first and second significant bits are not equal (0/1, 1/0) set v = z
v = z;
return ((h&1) == 0 ? u : -u)+((h&2) == 0 ? v : -v); // Use the last 2 bits to decide if u and v are positive or negative. Then return their addition.
}
public static double fade(double t) {
// Fade function as defined by Ken Perlin. This eases coordinate values
// so that they will "ease" towards integral values. This ends up smoothing
// the final output.
return t * t * t * (t * (t * 6 - 15) + 10); // 6t^5 - 15t^4 + 10t^3
}
public static double lerp(double a, double b, double x) {
return a + x * (b - a);
}
}

eAi commented Apr 1, 2016

Line 61 has a typo - the extra 'i' at the end.

Good catch @eAi

I liked this a lot, so i made a js implementation of it, which can be found here .

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