Skip to content

Instantly share code, notes, and snippets.

Embed
What would you like to do?
Network Security VAPT Checklist

Hi dear reader, there are very few technical network security assessment checklist. So I thought to share my own on this. Have a look and enjoy. Lets talk about the scope first. If you are given a 1000 machines to perform VAPT, then here is your scope. Single machine can have 65535 ports open. Any single port can deploy any service software from the world. For example FTP can be run on smartftp, pureftpd etc.. Any single FTP software version (for example pureftpd 1.0.22) can have number of vulnerabilities available. So if you multiply all of these, then it is impossible for any auditor to go ahead and probe all ports manually and find services manually. Even if he/she is able to do it, it is impossible to check all vulnerabilities that are pertaining to a single port of a single machine. Hence we have to rely on scanners such as nexpose, nessus, openvas, coreimpact etc. Here are some quick tools and test cases that one can perform on commonly found ports in the network pentest.

Identify live hosts

o Ping o Hping o Nmap

Identify OS type

o Nmap o Xprobe2 o Banner grabbing using telnet, nc (netcat)

Port scan

Nmap full SYN scan with verbose mode and service detection and disabling ping scan. Export normal and greppable output for future use.

  nmap -Pn -p- -sV X.X.X.X -v -sS -oG nmap_grepable_SYN -oN nmap_normal_SYN

Nmap top 1000 UDP scan with verbose mode and service detection and disabling ping scan. Export normal and greppable output for future use.

  nmap -Pn -top-ports=1000 -sV X.X.X.X -v -sS -oG nmap_grepable_UDP -oN nmap_normal_UDP

VA (Vulnerability Assessment)

Use nessus with below profile

DoS disabled

Web scan enabled

SSL scan on every ports instead of known ports

Enable TCP and UDP scan

Only give open ports’ list in the configuration that were found by nmap including TCP and UDP rather than full ports in order to save time particularly number of IPs are more and less time for audit and report.

o Use Nexpose o Use OpenVAS o Use nmap scanner on specific open ports using below command.

For example port 22 (SSH) is open and you want to run all scripts pertaining to SSH then use below command:

Nmap -Pn -sS -p22 --script ssh* -v In case if you are not sure about exact script name you can use * in order to run all scripts that starts with the ‘ssh’ keyword.

Audit SSL

Use openssl, sslyze tools to find below issues within SSL.

Self-signed certificate

SSL version 2 and 3 detection

Weak hashing algorithm

Use of RC4 and CBC ciphers

Logjam issue

Sweet32 issue

Certificate expiry

Openssl ChangeCipherSec issue

POODLE vulnerability

Openssl heartbleed issue

· Check for default passwords in server/device/service documentation o Lets say during your port scan or VA you found some services running on the server for example: cisco, brocad fabric OS, sonicwall firewall, apache tomcat manager. Then for these services Google what are the default configuration administrative username and password. Try those in your login and check your luck. · Hunting some common ports o DNS (53) UDP

Examine domain name system (DNS) using dnsenum, nslookup, dig and fierce tool

Check for zone transfer

Bruteforce subdomain using fierce tool

Run all nmap scripts using following command: nmap -Pn -sU -p53 --script dns* -v

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Check for DNS amplification attack

o SMTP (25) TCP

Check for SMTP open relay

Check for email spoofing

Check for username enumeration using VRFY command

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Send modified cryptors and check if SMTP gateway is enable to detect and block it?

Run all nmap script using following command: nmap -Pn -sS -p25 --script smtp* -v

o SNMP (161) UDP

Check for default community strings ‘public’ & ‘private’ using snmpwalk and snmpenum.pl script.

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Perform MIG enumeration.

· .1.3.6.1.2.1.1.5 Hostnames · .1.3.6.1.4.1.77.1.4.2 Domain Name · .1.3.6.1.4.1.77.1.2.25 Usernames · .1.3.6.1.4.1.77.1.2.3.1.1 Running Services · .1.3.6.1.4.1.77.1.2.27 Share Information o SSH (22) TCP

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Check if that supports sshv1 or not.

Bruteforce password using hydra and medusa

Check if it supports weak CBC ciphers and hmac algorithms using ssh2-enum-algos.nse nmap script.

Run all nmap scripts using following command: nmap -Pn -sS -p22 --script ssh* -v

o Cisco VPN (500) UDP

Check for aggressive and main mode enable using ikescan tool.

Enumeration using ikeprobe tool

Check for VPN group and try to crack PSK in order to get credentials to login into the VPN service through web panel.

o SMB (445,137,139) TCP

Check SAMBA service using metasploit use auxiliary/scanner/smb/smb_version

Get reverse shell using meterpreter reverse tcp module.

Check for SMB related vulnerability using ‘smb-check-vulns’ nmap script.

Reference: https://myexploit.wordpress.com/control-smb-445-137-139/

o FTP (21) TCP

Run all nmap script using following command: nmap -Pn -sS -p21 --script ftp* -v

Check for cleartext password submission for ftp login

Check for anonymous access using username and password as anonymous:anonymous

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Bruteforce FTP password using hydra and medusa

o Telnet (23) TCP

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Bruteforce telnet password

Run following nmap scripts

· telnet-brute.nse · telnet-encryption.nse · telnet-ntlm-info.nse o TFTP (69) UDP

TFTP Enumeration

· tftp ip_address PUT local_file · tftp ip_address GET conf.txt (or other files) · tftp – i GET /etc/passwd (old Solaris)

Bruteforce TFTP using TFTP bruteforcer tool

Run tftp-enum.nse nmap script

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

o RPC (111) TCP/UDP

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Run following nmap scripts

· bitcoinrpc-info.nse · metasploit-msgrpc-brute.nse · metasploit-xmlrpc-brute.nse · msrpc-enum.nse · nessus-xmlrpc-brute.nse · rpcap-brute.nse · rpcap-info.nse · rpc-grind.nse · rpcinfo.nse · xmlrpc-methods.nse

Perform RPC enumeration using rcpinfo tool

Check for the NFS folders so that data could be exported using showmount -e command.

o NTP (123) UDP

Perform NTP enumeration using below commands:

· ntpdc -c monlist IP_ADDRESS · ntpdc -c sysinfo IP_ADDRESS

Run all nmap scripts using nmap -Pn -sS -p21 --script ntp* -v

o HTTP/HTTPs (443,80,8080,8443) TCP

Banner grabbing using burp response

Run Nikto and dirb

Run all nmap scripts using following command nmap -Pn -sS -p21 --script http* -v

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

o SQL Server (1433,1434, 3306) TCP

Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Bruteforce and perform other operation using following tools:

· Piggy · SQLping · SQLpoke · SQLrecon · SQLver

Run following nmap scripts:

· ms-sql-brute.nse · ms-sql-config.nse · ms-sql-dac.nse · ms-sql-dump-hashes.nse · ms-sql-empty-password.nse · ms-sql-hasdbaccess.nse · ms-sql-info.nse · ms-sql-ntlm-info.nse · ms-sql-query.nse · ms-sql-tables.nse · ms-sql-xp-cmdshell.nse · pgsql-brute.nse

For MYSQL default username is root and password is

o Oracle (1521) TCP

Enumeration using following tools

· Tnsver [host] [port] · Tnscmd o perl tnscmd.pl -h ip_address o perl tnscmd.pl version -h ip_address o perl tnscmd.pl status -h ip_address

Enumeration & Bruteforce using below nmap scripts:

· oracle-brute.nse · oracle-brute-stealth.nse · oracle-enum-users.nse · oracle-sid-brute.nse · oracle-tns-version.nse o RDP (3389) TCP

Perform enumeration via connecting and checking login screen. Gather all active user’s name and domain/group name.

Perform RDP cryptography check using RDP-sec-check.pl script.

Run following nmap script:

· rdp-enum-encryption.nse · rdp-vuln-ms12-020.nse o SIP (5060)

Enumeration through following commands:

· Sipflanker - python sipflanker.py 192.168.1-254 · Sipscan - Smap - smap -l IP_Address Banner grabbing and finding publicly known exploits

Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment