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This is the solution to the Pyramid problem from Assignment 2 of the Stanford CS106A Introduction to Programming Methodology Class
/*
* File: Pyramid.java
* Name:
* Section Leader:
* ------------------
* This file is the starter file for the Pyramid problem.
* It includes definitions of the constants that match the
* sample run in the assignment, but you should make sure
* that changing these values causes the generated display
* to change accordingly.
*/
import acm.graphics.*;
import acm.program.*;
import java.awt.*;
public class Pyramid extends GraphicsProgram {
/** Width of each brick in pixels */
private static final int BRICK_WIDTH = 30;
/** Width of each brick in pixels */
private static final int BRICK_HEIGHT = 12;
/** Number of bricks in the base of the pyramid */
private static final int BRICKS_IN_BASE = 14;
public void run() {
putAllBricks();
}
private void putAllBricks()
{
//row - 0-based index of the row
//row+1 - The 1-based index of the row
//brickNum - 0-based index of the brick
//Loop through the 0-based index of the rows
for( int row = 0; row < BRICKS_IN_BASE; row++ )
{
int bricksInRow = BRICKS_IN_BASE - row;
//
// Total number of bricks = row
//
for( int brickNum = 0; brickNum < bricksInRow; brickNum++ )
{
//1. Calculate the center
//2. Calculate the starting point based on the center
//3. Add the number of bricks * brick width to find this brick's location
int x = ( getWidth()/2 ) - (BRICK_WIDTH * bricksInRow) / 2 + brickNum * BRICK_WIDTH;
//
// Calculate the vertical location of the brick based on the row
//
int y = getHeight() - BRICK_HEIGHT * (row+1);
//
// Draw the brick
//
GRect brick = new GRect( x , y , BRICK_WIDTH , BRICK_HEIGHT );
add(brick);
}
}
}
}
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dundir Nov 13, 2012

Nice solution. I was curious as to why you didn't decompose it though. What I mean by that is breaking it down into multiple simpler functions. For example you might have broken it down like LayBrick(x,y) LayRow(x,y,blocks), LayPyramid(startX,startY,BaseBlock). which simplifies things quite a bit structurally and lets you make large changes more easily. Although as I'm writing this I realize its been a year since you posted the code .. oops. Anyways. I think mine ended up having LayRow being int and returning blocks -1 with LayPyramid modifying x and y positions for next row in a do while loop and of course validating starting brick values so that they'll throw an error if they won't display properly.

dundir commented Nov 13, 2012

Nice solution. I was curious as to why you didn't decompose it though. What I mean by that is breaking it down into multiple simpler functions. For example you might have broken it down like LayBrick(x,y) LayRow(x,y,blocks), LayPyramid(startX,startY,BaseBlock). which simplifies things quite a bit structurally and lets you make large changes more easily. Although as I'm writing this I realize its been a year since you posted the code .. oops. Anyways. I think mine ended up having LayRow being int and returning blocks -1 with LayPyramid modifying x and y positions for next row in a do while loop and of course validating starting brick values so that they'll throw an error if they won't display properly.

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dsch31 Aug 3, 2018

Nice solution, thank you for great comments!

dsch31 commented Aug 3, 2018

Nice solution, thank you for great comments!

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