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PSGM / Server_on_a_stick.md
Last active Feb 13, 2017
Create a Windows Server image on a bootable USB drive
View Server_on_a_stick.md

Server on a stick

What is a "Server on a stick"?

It is the Windows server equivalent of the Windows consumer product feature "Windows To Go". Basically it is creating a Windows Server image on a bootable USB drive

Why?

@PSGM
PSGM / Disk_surpise_removed.md
Last active Mar 21, 2016
Disk surprise removed
View Disk_surpise_removed.md

Disk surprise removed

Problem description:

Under certain circumstances applications and utilities may fail with one (or more) of the following symptoms

  • Event ID 157 - Disk # has been surprise removed. The original documentation for this message appears to be this blog
  • Event ID 153 - The IO operation at logical block address xxxxxxxx for Disk # was retried. The original documentation for this message appears to be this blog
@PSGM
PSGM / NTFS_File_System_limitation.md
Last active Oct 1, 2018
NTFS File System limitation
View NTFS_File_System_limitation.md

NTFS file system limitation

Problem description:

Under certain circumstances applications and utilities may fail with one (or more) of the following symptoms

  • Error 0x80070299
  • The requested operation could not be completed due to a file system limitation
  • Insufficient system resources exist to complete the requested service
@PSGM
PSGM / selfsigned_wildcard_cert.md
Last active Jan 26, 2016
Creating a self-signed wildcard certificate for server authentication in a Windows environment
View selfsigned_wildcard_cert.md

Creating a self-signed wildcard certificate for server authentication in a Windows environment

We are increasingly using, or being required to use, SSL-encrypted sessions (or technically, TLS-encrypted sessions) for application services. In technical terms, because the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) in the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) used by a client to access a service needs to match the Common Name (CN) in the certificate used by that service, we potentially have a proliferation of certificates (at least one per server) that need to be available to clients

One approach to addressing this proliferation is to use wildcard certificates that match multiple FQDNs within a domain. Below is a discussion on generating self-signed wildcard certificates as a way of addressing this

What

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