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patch https://web.stanford.edu/class/cs140e/os.git @master @d9a6439 for rustc 1.28.0-nightly (cd494c1f0 2018-06-27); https://abcdabcd987.com/cs140e-1-shell/
diff -ruN orig/bootloader/Xargo.toml new/bootloader/Xargo.toml
--- orig/bootloader/Xargo.toml 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/bootloader/Xargo.toml 2018-07-19 22:31:03.000000000 +0800
@@ -2,10 +2,6 @@
core = {}
std_unicode = {}
-[dependencies.compiler_builtins]
-features = ["mem"]
-stage = 1
-
[dependencies.std]
path = "../std"
stage = 2
diff -ruN orig/bootloader/src/kmain.rs new/bootloader/src/kmain.rs
--- orig/bootloader/src/kmain.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/bootloader/src/kmain.rs 2018-07-19 22:31:19.000000000 +0800
@@ -1,5 +1,6 @@
#![feature(asm, lang_items)]
+extern crate core;
extern crate xmodem;
extern crate pi;
diff -ruN orig/bootloader/src/lang_items.rs new/bootloader/src/lang_items.rs
--- orig/bootloader/src/lang_items.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/bootloader/src/lang_items.rs 2018-07-19 22:31:50.000000000 +0800
@@ -1,6 +1,12 @@
+use core::panic::PanicInfo;
+
#[lang = "eh_personality"] pub extern fn eh_personality() {}
-#[lang = "panic_fmt"] #[no_mangle] pub extern fn panic_fmt() -> ! { loop{} }
+#[lang = "panic_impl"]
+#[no_mangle]
+pub extern fn rust_begin_panic(_info: &PanicInfo) -> ! {
+ loop {}
+}
#[no_mangle]
pub unsafe extern fn memcpy(dest: *mut u8, src: *const u8, n: usize) -> *mut u8 {
diff -ruN orig/kernel/Xargo.toml new/kernel/Xargo.toml
--- orig/kernel/Xargo.toml 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/kernel/Xargo.toml 2018-07-18 23:59:36.000000000 +0800
@@ -2,9 +2,6 @@
core = {}
std_unicode = {}
-[dependencies.compiler_builtins]
-features = ["mem"]
-stage = 1
[dependencies.std]
path = "../std"
diff -ruN orig/kernel/src/kmain.rs new/kernel/src/kmain.rs
--- orig/kernel/src/kmain.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/kernel/src/kmain.rs 2018-07-19 23:52:17.000000000 +0800
@@ -4,11 +4,12 @@
#![feature(asm)]
#![feature(optin_builtin_traits)]
#![feature(decl_macro)]
-#![feature(repr_align)]
+// #![feature(repr_align)] // stable since 1.25.0
#![feature(attr_literals)]
#![feature(never_type)]
#![feature(ptr_internals)]
+extern crate core;
extern crate pi;
extern crate stack_vec;
diff -ruN orig/kernel/src/lang_items.rs new/kernel/src/lang_items.rs
--- orig/kernel/src/lang_items.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/kernel/src/lang_items.rs 2018-07-19 22:28:29.000000000 +0800
@@ -1,6 +1,12 @@
+use core::panic::PanicInfo;
+
#[lang = "eh_personality"] pub extern fn eh_personality() {}
-#[lang = "panic_fmt"] #[no_mangle] pub extern fn panic_fmt() -> ! { loop{} }
+#[lang = "panic_impl"]
+#[no_mangle]
+pub extern fn rust_begin_panic(_info: &PanicInfo) -> ! {
+ loop {}
+}
#[no_mangle]
pub unsafe extern fn memcpy(dest: *mut u8, src: *const u8, n: usize) -> *mut u8 {
diff -ruN orig/pi/src/lib.rs new/pi/src/lib.rs
--- orig/pi/src/lib.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/pi/src/lib.rs 2018-07-19 22:34:26.000000000 +0800
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
#![feature(const_fn)]
#![feature(asm)]
#![feature(decl_macro)]
-#![feature(repr_align)]
+// #![feature(repr_align)] // stable since 1.25.0
#![feature(attr_literals)]
#![feature(never_type)]
diff -ruN orig/std/Xargo.toml new/std/Xargo.toml
--- orig/std/Xargo.toml 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/std/Xargo.toml 2018-07-18 23:59:36.000000000 +0800
@@ -1,6 +1,2 @@
[dependencies]
std_unicode = {}
-
-[dependencies.compiler_builtins]
-features = ["mem"]
-stage = 1
diff -ruN orig/std/src/lib.rs new/std/src/lib.rs
--- orig/std/src/lib.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/std/src/lib.rs 2018-07-19 22:29:52.000000000 +0800
@@ -38,11 +38,11 @@
#![feature(fn_traits)]
#![feature(fnbox)]
#![feature(fused)]
-#![feature(generic_param_attrs)]
+// #![feature(generic_param_attrs)] // stable since 1.27.0
#![feature(hashmap_hasher)]
#![feature(heap_api)]
#![feature(i128)]
-#![feature(i128_type)]
+// #![feature(i128_type)] // stable since 1.26.0.
#![feature(inclusive_range)]
#![feature(int_error_internals)]
#![feature(integer_atomics)]
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@
#![feature(libc)]
#![feature(link_args)]
#![feature(linkage)]
-#![feature(macro_reexport)]
+#![feature(use_extern_macros)]
#![feature(macro_vis_matcher)]
#![feature(needs_panic_runtime)]
#![feature(never_type)]
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@
#![feature(ptr_internals)]
#![feature(rand)]
#![feature(raw)]
-#![feature(repr_align)]
+// #![feature(repr_align)] // stable since 1.25.0
#![feature(rustc_attrs)]
#![feature(sip_hash_13)]
#![feature(slice_bytes)]
@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@
#![feature(str_char)]
#![feature(str_internals)]
#![feature(str_utf16)]
-#![feature(termination_trait)]
+// #![feature(termination_trait)] // stable since 1.26.0
#![feature(test, rustc_private)]
#![feature(thread_local)]
#![feature(toowned_clone_into)]
@@ -102,6 +102,7 @@
#![feature(slice_rsplit)]
#![feature(from_ref)]
#![feature(swap_with_slice)]
+#![feature(core_panic_info)]
// Explicitly import the prelude. The compiler uses this same unstable attribute
// to import the prelude implicitly when building crates that depend on std.
@@ -116,15 +117,18 @@
// We want to re-export a few macros from core but libcore has already been
// imported by the compiler (via our #[no_std] attribute) In this case we just
// add a new crate name so we can attach the re-exports to it.
-#[macro_reexport(panic, assert, assert_eq, assert_ne, debug_assert, debug_assert_eq,
- debug_assert_ne, unreachable, unimplemented, write, writeln, try)]
+// Re-export a few macros from core
+#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
+pub use core::{panic, assert_eq, assert_ne, debug_assert, debug_assert_eq, debug_assert_ne};
+#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
+pub use core::{unreachable, unimplemented, write, writeln, try};
extern crate core as __core;
// #[macro_use]
// #[macro_reexport(vec, format)]
// extern crate alloc;
// extern crate alloc_system;
-extern crate std_unicode;
+// extern crate std_unicode;
// #[doc(masked)]
// extern crate libc;
@@ -135,7 +139,6 @@
// compiler-rt intrinsics
#[doc(masked)]
-extern crate compiler_builtins;
// // During testing, this crate is not actually the "real" std library, but rather
// // it links to the real std library, which was compiled from this same source
@@ -226,7 +229,7 @@
// #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
// pub use alloc::vec;
#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
-pub use std_unicode::char;
+pub use core::char;
#[unstable(feature = "i128", issue = "35118")]
pub use core::u128;
diff -ruN orig/std/src/prelude/v1.rs new/std/src/prelude/v1.rs
--- orig/std/src/prelude/v1.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/std/src/prelude/v1.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:36.000000000 +0800
@@ -53,9 +53,10 @@
// #[doc(no_inline)] pub use vec::Vec;
// TODO: These are additions!
-#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
-pub use core::slice::SliceExt;
-#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
-pub use core::str::StrExt;
+// #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
+// pub use core::slice::SliceExt;
+// #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
+// pub use core::str::StrExt;
#[stable(feature = "addition", since = "1.0.0")]
-pub use std_unicode::str::*;
+pub use core::str::*;
+// pub use std_unicode::str::*;
diff -ruN orig/std/src/slice.rs new/std/src/slice.rs
--- orig/std/src/slice.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/std/src/slice.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:36.000000000 +0800
@@ -97,11 +97,11 @@
// It's cleaner to just turn off the unused_imports warning than to fix them.
#![cfg_attr(test, allow(unused_imports, dead_code))]
-use core::cmp::Ordering::{self /*, Less */};
+// use core::cmp::Ordering::{self /*, Less */};
// use core::mem::size_of;
// use core::mem;
// use core::ptr;
-use core::slice as core_slice;
+// use core::slice as core_slice;
// use borrow::{Borrow, BorrowMut, ToOwned};
// use boxed::Box;
@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@
#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
pub use core::slice::{from_raw_parts, from_raw_parts_mut};
#[unstable(feature = "from_ref", issue = "45703")]
-pub use core::slice::{from_ref, from_ref_mut};
+pub use core::slice::{from_ref, from_mut};
#[unstable(feature = "slice_get_slice", issue = "35729")]
pub use core::slice::SliceIndex;
// #[unstable(feature = "exact_chunks", issue = "47115")]
@@ -170,1665 +170,6 @@
// }
// }
-#[lang = "slice"]
-#[cfg(not(test))]
-impl<T> [T] {
- /// Returns the number of elements in the slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let a = [1, 2, 3];
- /// assert_eq!(a.len(), 3);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn len(&self) -> usize {
- core_slice::SliceExt::len(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if the slice has a length of 0.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let a = [1, 2, 3];
- /// assert!(!a.is_empty());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn is_empty(&self) -> bool {
- core_slice::SliceExt::is_empty(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns the first element of the slice, or `None` if it is empty.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30];
- /// assert_eq!(Some(&10), v.first());
- ///
- /// let w: &[i32] = &[];
- /// assert_eq!(None, w.first());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn first(&self) -> Option<&T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::first(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns a mutable pointer to the first element of the slice, or `None` if it is empty.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];
- ///
- /// if let Some(first) = x.first_mut() {
- /// *first = 5;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[5, 1, 2]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn first_mut(&mut self) -> Option<&mut T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::first_mut(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns the first and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or `None` if it is empty.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &[0, 1, 2];
- ///
- /// if let Some((first, elements)) = x.split_first() {
- /// assert_eq!(first, &0);
- /// assert_eq!(elements, &[1, 2]);
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "slice_splits", since = "1.5.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_first(&self) -> Option<(&T, &[T])> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split_first(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns the first and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or `None` if it is empty.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];
- ///
- /// if let Some((first, elements)) = x.split_first_mut() {
- /// *first = 3;
- /// elements[0] = 4;
- /// elements[1] = 5;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[3, 4, 5]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "slice_splits", since = "1.5.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_first_mut(&mut self) -> Option<(&mut T, &mut [T])> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split_first_mut(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns the last and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or `None` if it is empty.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &[0, 1, 2];
- ///
- /// if let Some((last, elements)) = x.split_last() {
- /// assert_eq!(last, &2);
- /// assert_eq!(elements, &[0, 1]);
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "slice_splits", since = "1.5.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_last(&self) -> Option<(&T, &[T])> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split_last(self)
-
- }
-
- /// Returns the last and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or `None` if it is empty.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];
- ///
- /// if let Some((last, elements)) = x.split_last_mut() {
- /// *last = 3;
- /// elements[0] = 4;
- /// elements[1] = 5;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[4, 5, 3]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "slice_splits", since = "1.5.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_last_mut(&mut self) -> Option<(&mut T, &mut [T])> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split_last_mut(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns the last element of the slice, or `None` if it is empty.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30];
- /// assert_eq!(Some(&30), v.last());
- ///
- /// let w: &[i32] = &[];
- /// assert_eq!(None, w.last());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn last(&self) -> Option<&T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::last(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns a mutable pointer to the last item in the slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];
- ///
- /// if let Some(last) = x.last_mut() {
- /// *last = 10;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[0, 1, 10]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn last_mut(&mut self) -> Option<&mut T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::last_mut(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns a reference to an element or subslice depending on the type of
- /// index.
- ///
- /// - If given a position, returns a reference to the element at that
- /// position or `None` if out of bounds.
- /// - If given a range, returns the subslice corresponding to that range,
- /// or `None` if out of bounds.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30];
- /// assert_eq!(Some(&40), v.get(1));
- /// assert_eq!(Some(&[10, 40][..]), v.get(0..2));
- /// assert_eq!(None, v.get(3));
- /// assert_eq!(None, v.get(0..4));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn get<I>(&self, index: I) -> Option<&I::Output>
- where I: SliceIndex<Self>
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::get(self, index)
- }
-
- /// Returns a mutable reference to an element or subslice depending on the
- /// type of index (see [`get`]) or `None` if the index is out of bounds.
- ///
- /// [`get`]: #method.get
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];
- ///
- /// if let Some(elem) = x.get_mut(1) {
- /// *elem = 42;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[0, 42, 2]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn get_mut<I>(&mut self, index: I) -> Option<&mut I::Output>
- where I: SliceIndex<Self>
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::get_mut(self, index)
- }
-
- /// Returns a reference to an element or subslice, without doing bounds
- /// checking.
- ///
- /// This is generally not recommended, use with caution! For a safe
- /// alternative see [`get`].
- ///
- /// [`get`]: #method.get
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &[1, 2, 4];
- ///
- /// unsafe {
- /// assert_eq!(x.get_unchecked(1), &2);
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub unsafe fn get_unchecked<I>(&self, index: I) -> &I::Output
- where I: SliceIndex<Self>
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::get_unchecked(self, index)
- }
-
- /// Returns a mutable reference to an element or subslice, without doing
- /// bounds checking.
- ///
- /// This is generally not recommended, use with caution! For a safe
- /// alternative see [`get_mut`].
- ///
- /// [`get_mut`]: #method.get_mut
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [1, 2, 4];
- ///
- /// unsafe {
- /// let elem = x.get_unchecked_mut(1);
- /// *elem = 13;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[1, 13, 4]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub unsafe fn get_unchecked_mut<I>(&mut self, index: I) -> &mut I::Output
- where I: SliceIndex<Self>
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::get_unchecked_mut(self, index)
- }
-
- /// Returns a raw pointer to the slice's buffer.
- ///
- /// The caller must ensure that the slice outlives the pointer this
- /// function returns, or else it will end up pointing to garbage.
- ///
- /// Modifying the container referenced by this slice may cause its buffer
- /// to be reallocated, which would also make any pointers to it invalid.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &[1, 2, 4];
- /// let x_ptr = x.as_ptr();
- ///
- /// unsafe {
- /// for i in 0..x.len() {
- /// assert_eq!(x.get_unchecked(i), &*x_ptr.offset(i as isize));
- /// }
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn as_ptr(&self) -> *const T {
- core_slice::SliceExt::as_ptr(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns an unsafe mutable pointer to the slice's buffer.
- ///
- /// The caller must ensure that the slice outlives the pointer this
- /// function returns, or else it will end up pointing to garbage.
- ///
- /// Modifying the container referenced by this slice may cause its buffer
- /// to be reallocated, which would also make any pointers to it invalid.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [1, 2, 4];
- /// let x_ptr = x.as_mut_ptr();
- ///
- /// unsafe {
- /// for i in 0..x.len() {
- /// *x_ptr.offset(i as isize) += 2;
- /// }
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[3, 4, 6]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn as_mut_ptr(&mut self) -> *mut T {
- core_slice::SliceExt::as_mut_ptr(self)
- }
-
- /// Swaps two elements in the slice.
- ///
- /// # Arguments
- ///
- /// * a - The index of the first element
- /// * b - The index of the second element
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `a` or `b` are out of bounds.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = ["a", "b", "c", "d"];
- /// v.swap(1, 3);
- /// assert!(v == ["a", "d", "c", "b"]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn swap(&mut self, a: usize, b: usize) {
- core_slice::SliceExt::swap(self, a, b)
- }
-
- /// Reverses the order of elements in the slice, in place.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = [1, 2, 3];
- /// v.reverse();
- /// assert!(v == [3, 2, 1]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn reverse(&mut self) {
- core_slice::SliceExt::reverse(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over the slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &[1, 2, 4];
- /// let mut iterator = x.iter();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(iterator.next(), Some(&1));
- /// assert_eq!(iterator.next(), Some(&2));
- /// assert_eq!(iterator.next(), Some(&4));
- /// assert_eq!(iterator.next(), None);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn iter(&self) -> Iter<T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::iter(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator that allows modifying each value.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = &mut [1, 2, 4];
- /// for elem in x.iter_mut() {
- /// *elem += 2;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(x, &[3, 4, 6]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn iter_mut(&mut self) -> IterMut<T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::iter_mut(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over all contiguous windows of length
- /// `size`. The windows overlap. If the slice is shorter than
- /// `size`, the iterator returns no values.
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `size` is 0.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let slice = ['r', 'u', 's', 't'];
- /// let mut iter = slice.windows(2);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['r', 'u']);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['u', 's']);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['s', 't']);
- /// assert!(iter.next().is_none());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// If the slice is shorter than `size`:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let slice = ['f', 'o', 'o'];
- /// let mut iter = slice.windows(4);
- /// assert!(iter.next().is_none());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn windows(&self, size: usize) -> Windows<T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::windows(self, size)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over `chunk_size` elements of the slice at a
- /// time. The chunks are slices and do not overlap. If `chunk_size` does
- /// not divide the length of the slice, then the last chunk will
- /// not have length `chunk_size`.
- ///
- /// See [`exact_chunks`] for a variant of this iterator that returns chunks
- /// of always exactly `chunk_size` elements.
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `chunk_size` is 0.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let slice = ['l', 'o', 'r', 'e', 'm'];
- /// let mut iter = slice.chunks(2);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['l', 'o']);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['r', 'e']);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['m']);
- /// assert!(iter.next().is_none());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [`exact_chunks`]: #method.exact_chunks
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn chunks(&self, chunk_size: usize) -> Chunks<T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::chunks(self, chunk_size)
- }
-
- // /// Returns an iterator over `chunk_size` elements of the slice at a
- // /// time. The chunks are slices and do not overlap. If `chunk_size` does
- // /// not divide the length of the slice, then the last up to `chunk_size-1`
- // /// elements will be omitted.
- // ///
- // /// Due to each chunk having exactly `chunk_size` elements, the compiler
- // /// can often optimize the resulting code better than in the case of
- // /// [`chunks`].
- // ///
- // /// # Panics
- // ///
- // /// Panics if `chunk_size` is 0.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// #![feature(exact_chunks)]
- // ///
- // /// let slice = ['l', 'o', 'r', 'e', 'm'];
- // /// let mut iter = slice.exact_chunks(2);
- // /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['l', 'o']);
- // /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['r', 'e']);
- // /// assert!(iter.next().is_none());
- // /// ```
- // ///
- // /// [`chunks`]: #method.chunks
- // #[unstable(feature = "exact_chunks", issue = "47115")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn exact_chunks(&self, chunk_size: usize) -> ExactChunks<T> {
- // core_slice::SliceExt::exact_chunks(self, chunk_size)
- // }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over `chunk_size` elements of the slice at a time.
- /// The chunks are mutable slices, and do not overlap. If `chunk_size` does
- /// not divide the length of the slice, then the last chunk will not
- /// have length `chunk_size`.
- ///
- /// See [`exact_chunks_mut`] for a variant of this iterator that returns chunks
- /// of always exactly `chunk_size` elements.
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `chunk_size` is 0.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = &mut [0, 0, 0, 0, 0];
- /// let mut count = 1;
- ///
- /// for chunk in v.chunks_mut(2) {
- /// for elem in chunk.iter_mut() {
- /// *elem += count;
- /// }
- /// count += 1;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(v, &[1, 1, 2, 2, 3]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [`exact_chunks_mut`]: #method.exact_chunks_mut
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn chunks_mut(&mut self, chunk_size: usize) -> ChunksMut<T> {
- core_slice::SliceExt::chunks_mut(self, chunk_size)
- }
-
- // /// Returns an iterator over `chunk_size` elements of the slice at a time.
- // /// The chunks are mutable slices, and do not overlap. If `chunk_size` does
- // /// not divide the length of the slice, then the last up to `chunk_size-1`
- // /// elements will be omitted.
- // ///
- // ///
- // /// Due to each chunk having exactly `chunk_size` elements, the compiler
- // /// can often optimize the resulting code better than in the case of
- // /// [`chunks_mut`].
- // ///
- // /// # Panics
- // ///
- // /// Panics if `chunk_size` is 0.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// #![feature(exact_chunks)]
- // ///
- // /// let v = &mut [0, 0, 0, 0, 0];
- // /// let mut count = 1;
- // ///
- // /// for chunk in v.exact_chunks_mut(2) {
- // /// for elem in chunk.iter_mut() {
- // /// *elem += count;
- // /// }
- // /// count += 1;
- // /// }
- // /// assert_eq!(v, &[1, 1, 2, 2, 0]);
- // /// ```
- // ///
- // /// [`chunks_mut`]: #method.chunks_mut
- // #[unstable(feature = "exact_chunks", issue = "47115")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn exact_chunks_mut(&mut self, chunk_size: usize) -> ExactChunksMut<T> {
- // core_slice::SliceExt::exact_chunks_mut(self, chunk_size)
- // }
-
- /// Divides one slice into two at an index.
- ///
- /// The first will contain all indices from `[0, mid)` (excluding
- /// the index `mid` itself) and the second will contain all
- /// indices from `[mid, len)` (excluding the index `len` itself).
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `mid > len`.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];
- ///
- /// {
- /// let (left, right) = v.split_at(0);
- /// assert!(left == []);
- /// assert!(right == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]);
- /// }
- ///
- /// {
- /// let (left, right) = v.split_at(2);
- /// assert!(left == [1, 2]);
- /// assert!(right == [3, 4, 5, 6]);
- /// }
- ///
- /// {
- /// let (left, right) = v.split_at(6);
- /// assert!(left == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]);
- /// assert!(right == []);
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_at(&self, mid: usize) -> (&[T], &[T]) {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split_at(self, mid)
- }
-
- /// Divides one mutable slice into two at an index.
- ///
- /// The first will contain all indices from `[0, mid)` (excluding
- /// the index `mid` itself) and the second will contain all
- /// indices from `[mid, len)` (excluding the index `len` itself).
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `mid > len`.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = [1, 0, 3, 0, 5, 6];
- /// // scoped to restrict the lifetime of the borrows
- /// {
- /// let (left, right) = v.split_at_mut(2);
- /// assert!(left == [1, 0]);
- /// assert!(right == [3, 0, 5, 6]);
- /// left[1] = 2;
- /// right[1] = 4;
- /// }
- /// assert!(v == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_at_mut(&mut self, mid: usize) -> (&mut [T], &mut [T]) {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split_at_mut(self, mid)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match
- /// `pred`. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let slice = [10, 40, 33, 20];
- /// let mut iter = slice.split(|num| num % 3 == 0);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[10, 40]);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[20]);
- /// assert!(iter.next().is_none());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// If the first element is matched, an empty slice will be the first item
- /// returned by the iterator. Similarly, if the last element in the slice
- /// is matched, an empty slice will be the last item returned by the
- /// iterator:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let slice = [10, 40, 33];
- /// let mut iter = slice.split(|num| num % 3 == 0);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[10, 40]);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[]);
- /// assert!(iter.next().is_none());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// If two matched elements are directly adjacent, an empty slice will be
- /// present between them:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let slice = [10, 6, 33, 20];
- /// let mut iter = slice.split(|num| num % 3 == 0);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[10]);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[]);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[20]);
- /// assert!(iter.next().is_none());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split<F>(&self, pred: F) -> Split<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split(self, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over mutable subslices separated by elements that
- /// match `pred`. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];
- ///
- /// for group in v.split_mut(|num| *num % 3 == 0) {
- /// group[0] = 1;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(v, [1, 40, 30, 1, 60, 1]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_mut<F>(&mut self, pred: F) -> SplitMut<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::split_mut(self, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match
- /// `pred`, starting at the end of the slice and working backwards.
- /// The matched element is not contained in the subslices.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// #![feature(slice_rsplit)]
- ///
- /// let slice = [11, 22, 33, 0, 44, 55];
- /// let mut iter = slice.rsplit(|num| *num == 0);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[44, 55]);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[11, 22, 33]);
- /// assert_eq!(iter.next(), None);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// As with `split()`, if the first or last element is matched, an empty
- /// slice will be the first (or last) item returned by the iterator.
- ///
- /// ```
- /// #![feature(slice_rsplit)]
- ///
- /// let v = &[0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8];
- /// let mut it = v.rsplit(|n| *n % 2 == 0);
- /// assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[]);
- /// assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[3, 5]);
- /// assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[1, 1]);
- /// assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[]);
- /// assert_eq!(it.next(), None);
- /// ```
- #[unstable(feature = "slice_rsplit", issue = "41020")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn rsplit<F>(&self, pred: F) -> RSplit<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::rsplit(self, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over mutable subslices separated by elements that
- /// match `pred`, starting at the end of the slice and working
- /// backwards. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// #![feature(slice_rsplit)]
- ///
- /// let mut v = [100, 400, 300, 200, 600, 500];
- ///
- /// let mut count = 0;
- /// for group in v.rsplit_mut(|num| *num % 3 == 0) {
- /// count += 1;
- /// group[0] = count;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(v, [3, 400, 300, 2, 600, 1]);
- /// ```
- ///
- #[unstable(feature = "slice_rsplit", issue = "41020")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn rsplit_mut<F>(&mut self, pred: F) -> RSplitMut<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::rsplit_mut(self, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match
- /// `pred`, limited to returning at most `n` items. The matched element is
- /// not contained in the subslices.
- ///
- /// The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the
- /// slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Print the slice split once by numbers divisible by 3 (i.e. `[10, 40]`,
- /// `[20, 60, 50]`):
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];
- ///
- /// for group in v.splitn(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
- /// println!("{:?}", group);
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn splitn<F>(&self, n: usize, pred: F) -> SplitN<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::splitn(self, n, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match
- /// `pred`, limited to returning at most `n` items. The matched element is
- /// not contained in the subslices.
- ///
- /// The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the
- /// slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];
- ///
- /// for group in v.splitn_mut(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
- /// group[0] = 1;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(v, [1, 40, 30, 1, 60, 50]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn splitn_mut<F>(&mut self, n: usize, pred: F) -> SplitNMut<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::splitn_mut(self, n, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match
- /// `pred` limited to returning at most `n` items. This starts at the end of
- /// the slice and works backwards. The matched element is not contained in
- /// the subslices.
- ///
- /// The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the
- /// slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Print the slice split once, starting from the end, by numbers divisible
- /// by 3 (i.e. `[50]`, `[10, 40, 30, 20]`):
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];
- ///
- /// for group in v.rsplitn(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
- /// println!("{:?}", group);
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn rsplitn<F>(&self, n: usize, pred: F) -> RSplitN<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::rsplitn(self, n, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match
- /// `pred` limited to returning at most `n` items. This starts at the end of
- /// the slice and works backwards. The matched element is not contained in
- /// the subslices.
- ///
- /// The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the
- /// slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut s = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];
- ///
- /// for group in s.rsplitn_mut(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
- /// group[0] = 1;
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!(s, [1, 40, 30, 20, 60, 1]);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn rsplitn_mut<F>(&mut self, n: usize, pred: F) -> RSplitNMut<T, F>
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> bool
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::rsplitn_mut(self, n, pred)
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if the slice contains an element with the given value.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30];
- /// assert!(v.contains(&30));
- /// assert!(!v.contains(&50));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- pub fn contains(&self, x: &T) -> bool
- where T: PartialEq
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::contains(self, x)
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if `needle` is a prefix of the slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30];
- /// assert!(v.starts_with(&[10]));
- /// assert!(v.starts_with(&[10, 40]));
- /// assert!(!v.starts_with(&[50]));
- /// assert!(!v.starts_with(&[10, 50]));
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Always returns `true` if `needle` is an empty slice:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = &[10, 40, 30];
- /// assert!(v.starts_with(&[]));
- /// let v: &[u8] = &[];
- /// assert!(v.starts_with(&[]));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- pub fn starts_with(&self, needle: &[T]) -> bool
- where T: PartialEq
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::starts_with(self, needle)
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if `needle` is a suffix of the slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = [10, 40, 30];
- /// assert!(v.ends_with(&[30]));
- /// assert!(v.ends_with(&[40, 30]));
- /// assert!(!v.ends_with(&[50]));
- /// assert!(!v.ends_with(&[50, 30]));
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Always returns `true` if `needle` is an empty slice:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = &[10, 40, 30];
- /// assert!(v.ends_with(&[]));
- /// let v: &[u8] = &[];
- /// assert!(v.ends_with(&[]));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- pub fn ends_with(&self, needle: &[T]) -> bool
- where T: PartialEq
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::ends_with(self, needle)
- }
-
- /// Binary searches this sorted slice for a given element.
- ///
- /// If the value is found then `Ok` is returned, containing the
- /// index of the matching element; if the value is not found then
- /// `Err` is returned, containing the index where a matching
- /// element could be inserted while maintaining sorted order.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Looks up a series of four elements. The first is found, with a
- /// uniquely determined position; the second and third are not
- /// found; the fourth could match any position in `[1, 4]`.
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55];
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search(&13), Ok(9));
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search(&4), Err(7));
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search(&100), Err(13));
- /// let r = s.binary_search(&1);
- /// assert!(match r { Ok(1...4) => true, _ => false, });
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- pub fn binary_search(&self, x: &T) -> Result<usize, usize>
- where T: Ord
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::binary_search(self, x)
- }
-
- /// Binary searches this sorted slice with a comparator function.
- ///
- /// The comparator function should implement an order consistent
- /// with the sort order of the underlying slice, returning an
- /// order code that indicates whether its argument is `Less`,
- /// `Equal` or `Greater` the desired target.
- ///
- /// If a matching value is found then returns `Ok`, containing
- /// the index for the matched element; if no match is found then
- /// `Err` is returned, containing the index where a matching
- /// element could be inserted while maintaining sorted order.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Looks up a series of four elements. The first is found, with a
- /// uniquely determined position; the second and third are not
- /// found; the fourth could match any position in `[1, 4]`.
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55];
- ///
- /// let seek = 13;
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek)), Ok(9));
- /// let seek = 4;
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek)), Err(7));
- /// let seek = 100;
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek)), Err(13));
- /// let seek = 1;
- /// let r = s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek));
- /// assert!(match r { Ok(1...4) => true, _ => false, });
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn binary_search_by<'a, F>(&'a self, f: F) -> Result<usize, usize>
- where F: FnMut(&'a T) -> Ordering
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::binary_search_by(self, f)
- }
-
- /// Binary searches this sorted slice with a key extraction function.
- ///
- /// Assumes that the slice is sorted by the key, for instance with
- /// [`sort_by_key`] using the same key extraction function.
- ///
- /// If a matching value is found then returns `Ok`, containing the
- /// index for the matched element; if no match is found then `Err`
- /// is returned, containing the index where a matching element could
- /// be inserted while maintaining sorted order.
- ///
- /// [`sort_by_key`]: #method.sort_by_key
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Looks up a series of four elements in a slice of pairs sorted by
- /// their second elements. The first is found, with a uniquely
- /// determined position; the second and third are not found; the
- /// fourth could match any position in `[1, 4]`.
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = [(0, 0), (2, 1), (4, 1), (5, 1), (3, 1),
- /// (1, 2), (2, 3), (4, 5), (5, 8), (3, 13),
- /// (1, 21), (2, 34), (4, 55)];
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by_key(&13, |&(a,b)| b), Ok(9));
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by_key(&4, |&(a,b)| b), Err(7));
- /// assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by_key(&100, |&(a,b)| b), Err(13));
- /// let r = s.binary_search_by_key(&1, |&(a,b)| b);
- /// assert!(match r { Ok(1...4) => true, _ => false, });
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "slice_binary_search_by_key", since = "1.10.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn binary_search_by_key<'a, B, F>(&'a self, b: &B, f: F) -> Result<usize, usize>
- where F: FnMut(&'a T) -> B,
- B: Ord
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::binary_search_by_key(self, b, f)
- }
-
- // /// Sorts the slice.
- // ///
- // /// This sort is stable (i.e. does not reorder equal elements) and `O(n log n)` worst-case.
- // ///
- // /// When applicable, unstable sorting is preferred because it is generally faster than stable
- // /// sorting and it doesn't allocate auxiliary memory.
- // /// See [`sort_unstable`](#method.sort_unstable).
- // ///
- // /// # Current implementation
- // ///
- // /// The current algorithm is an adaptive, iterative merge sort inspired by
- // /// [timsort](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timsort).
- // /// It is designed to be very fast in cases where the slice is nearly sorted, or consists of
- // /// two or more sorted sequences concatenated one after another.
- // ///
- // /// Also, it allocates temporary storage half the size of `self`, but for short slices a
- // /// non-allocating insertion sort is used instead.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// let mut v = [-5, 4, 1, -3, 2];
- // ///
- // /// v.sort();
- // /// assert!(v == [-5, -3, 1, 2, 4]);
- // /// ```
- // #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn sort(&mut self)
- // where T: Ord
- // {
- // merge_sort(self, |a, b| a.lt(b));
- // }
-
- // /// Sorts the slice with a comparator function.
- // ///
- // /// This sort is stable (i.e. does not reorder equal elements) and `O(n log n)` worst-case.
- // ///
- // /// When applicable, unstable sorting is preferred because it is generally faster than stable
- // /// sorting and it doesn't allocate auxiliary memory.
- // /// See [`sort_unstable_by`](#method.sort_unstable_by).
- // ///
- // /// # Current implementation
- // ///
- // /// The current algorithm is an adaptive, iterative merge sort inspired by
- // /// [timsort](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timsort).
- // /// It is designed to be very fast in cases where the slice is nearly sorted, or consists of
- // /// two or more sorted sequences concatenated one after another.
- // ///
- // /// Also, it allocates temporary storage half the size of `self`, but for short slices a
- // /// non-allocating insertion sort is used instead.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// let mut v = [5, 4, 1, 3, 2];
- // /// v.sort_by(|a, b| a.cmp(b));
- // /// assert!(v == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]);
- // ///
- // /// // reverse sorting
- // /// v.sort_by(|a, b| b.cmp(a));
- // /// assert!(v == [5, 4, 3, 2, 1]);
- // /// ```
- // #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn sort_by<F>(&mut self, mut compare: F)
- // where F: FnMut(&T, &T) -> Ordering
- // {
- // merge_sort(self, |a, b| compare(a, b) == Less);
- // }
-
- // /// Sorts the slice with a key extraction function.
- // ///
- // /// This sort is stable (i.e. does not reorder equal elements) and `O(n log n)` worst-case.
- // ///
- // /// When applicable, unstable sorting is preferred because it is generally faster than stable
- // /// sorting and it doesn't allocate auxiliary memory.
- // /// See [`sort_unstable_by_key`](#method.sort_unstable_by_key).
- // ///
- // /// # Current implementation
- // ///
- // /// The current algorithm is an adaptive, iterative merge sort inspired by
- // /// [timsort](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timsort).
- // /// It is designed to be very fast in cases where the slice is nearly sorted, or consists of
- // /// two or more sorted sequences concatenated one after another.
- // ///
- // /// Also, it allocates temporary storage half the size of `self`, but for short slices a
- // /// non-allocating insertion sort is used instead.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// let mut v = [-5i32, 4, 1, -3, 2];
- // ///
- // /// v.sort_by_key(|k| k.abs());
- // /// assert!(v == [1, 2, -3, 4, -5]);
- // /// ```
- // #[stable(feature = "slice_sort_by_key", since = "1.7.0")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn sort_by_key<B, F>(&mut self, mut f: F)
- // where F: FnMut(&T) -> B, B: Ord
- // {
- // merge_sort(self, |a, b| f(a).lt(&f(b)));
- // }
-
- /// Sorts the slice, but may not preserve the order of equal elements.
- ///
- /// This sort is unstable (i.e. may reorder equal elements), in-place (i.e. does not allocate),
- /// and `O(n log n)` worst-case.
- ///
- /// # Current implementation
- ///
- /// The current algorithm is based on [pattern-defeating quicksort][pdqsort] by Orson Peters,
- /// which combines the fast average case of randomized quicksort with the fast worst case of
- /// heapsort, while achieving linear time on slices with certain patterns. It uses some
- /// randomization to avoid degenerate cases, but with a fixed seed to always provide
- /// deterministic behavior.
- ///
- /// It is typically faster than stable sorting, except in a few special cases, e.g. when the
- /// slice consists of several concatenated sorted sequences.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = [-5, 4, 1, -3, 2];
- ///
- /// v.sort_unstable();
- /// assert!(v == [-5, -3, 1, 2, 4]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [pdqsort]: https://github.com/orlp/pdqsort
- #[stable(feature = "sort_unstable", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn sort_unstable(&mut self)
- where T: Ord
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::sort_unstable(self);
- }
-
- /// Sorts the slice with a comparator function, but may not preserve the order of equal
- /// elements.
- ///
- /// This sort is unstable (i.e. may reorder equal elements), in-place (i.e. does not allocate),
- /// and `O(n log n)` worst-case.
- ///
- /// # Current implementation
- ///
- /// The current algorithm is based on [pattern-defeating quicksort][pdqsort] by Orson Peters,
- /// which combines the fast average case of randomized quicksort with the fast worst case of
- /// heapsort, while achieving linear time on slices with certain patterns. It uses some
- /// randomization to avoid degenerate cases, but with a fixed seed to always provide
- /// deterministic behavior.
- ///
- /// It is typically faster than stable sorting, except in a few special cases, e.g. when the
- /// slice consists of several concatenated sorted sequences.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = [5, 4, 1, 3, 2];
- /// v.sort_unstable_by(|a, b| a.cmp(b));
- /// assert!(v == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]);
- ///
- /// // reverse sorting
- /// v.sort_unstable_by(|a, b| b.cmp(a));
- /// assert!(v == [5, 4, 3, 2, 1]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [pdqsort]: https://github.com/orlp/pdqsort
- #[stable(feature = "sort_unstable", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn sort_unstable_by<F>(&mut self, compare: F)
- where F: FnMut(&T, &T) -> Ordering
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::sort_unstable_by(self, compare);
- }
-
- /// Sorts the slice with a key extraction function, but may not preserve the order of equal
- /// elements.
- ///
- /// This sort is unstable (i.e. may reorder equal elements), in-place (i.e. does not allocate),
- /// and `O(n log n)` worst-case.
- ///
- /// # Current implementation
- ///
- /// The current algorithm is based on [pattern-defeating quicksort][pdqsort] by Orson Peters,
- /// which combines the fast average case of randomized quicksort with the fast worst case of
- /// heapsort, while achieving linear time on slices with certain patterns. It uses some
- /// randomization to avoid degenerate cases, but with a fixed seed to always provide
- /// deterministic behavior.
- ///
- /// It is typically faster than stable sorting, except in a few special cases, e.g. when the
- /// slice consists of several concatenated sorted sequences.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = [-5i32, 4, 1, -3, 2];
- ///
- /// v.sort_unstable_by_key(|k| k.abs());
- /// assert!(v == [1, 2, -3, 4, -5]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [pdqsort]: https://github.com/orlp/pdqsort
- #[stable(feature = "sort_unstable", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn sort_unstable_by_key<B, F>(&mut self, f: F)
- where F: FnMut(&T) -> B,
- B: Ord
- {
- core_slice::SliceExt::sort_unstable_by_key(self, f);
- }
-
- // /// Rotates the slice in-place such that the first `mid` elements of the
- // /// slice move to the end while the last `self.len() - mid` elements move to
- // /// the front. After calling `rotate_left`, the element previously at index
- // /// `mid` will become the first element in the slice.
- // ///
- // /// # Panics
- // ///
- // /// This function will panic if `mid` is greater than the length of the
- // /// slice. Note that `mid == self.len()` does _not_ panic and is a no-op
- // /// rotation.
- // ///
- // /// # Complexity
- // ///
- // /// Takes linear (in `self.len()`) time.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// #![feature(slice_rotate)]
- // ///
- // /// let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
- // /// a.rotate_left(2);
- // /// assert_eq!(a, ['c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'a', 'b']);
- // /// ```
- // ///
- // /// Rotating a subslice:
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// #![feature(slice_rotate)]
- // ///
- // /// let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
- // /// a[1..5].rotate_left(1);
- // /// assert_eq!(a, ['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'f']);
- // /// ```
- // #[unstable(feature = "slice_rotate", issue = "41891")]
- // pub fn rotate_left(&mut self, mid: usize) {
- // core_slice::SliceExt::rotate_left(self, mid);
- // }
-
- // #[unstable(feature = "slice_rotate", issue = "41891")]
- // #[rustc_deprecated(since = "", reason = "renamed to `rotate_left`")]
- // pub fn rotate(&mut self, mid: usize) {
- // core_slice::SliceExt::rotate_left(self, mid);
- // }
-
- // /// Rotates the slice in-place such that the first `self.len() - k`
- // /// elements of the slice move to the end while the last `k` elements move
- // /// to the front. After calling `rotate_right`, the element previously at
- // /// index `self.len() - k` will become the first element in the slice.
- // ///
- // /// # Panics
- // ///
- // /// This function will panic if `k` is greater than the length of the
- // /// slice. Note that `k == self.len()` does _not_ panic and is a no-op
- // /// rotation.
- // ///
- // /// # Complexity
- // ///
- // /// Takes linear (in `self.len()`) time.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// #![feature(slice_rotate)]
- // ///
- // /// let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
- // /// a.rotate_right(2);
- // /// assert_eq!(a, ['e', 'f', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd']);
- // /// ```
- // ///
- // /// Rotate a subslice:
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// #![feature(slice_rotate)]
- // ///
- // /// let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
- // /// a[1..5].rotate_right(1);
- // /// assert_eq!(a, ['a', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'f']);
- // /// ```
- // #[unstable(feature = "slice_rotate", issue = "41891")]
- // pub fn rotate_right(&mut self, k: usize) {
- // core_slice::SliceExt::rotate_right(self, k);
- // }
-
- /// Copies the elements from `src` into `self`.
- ///
- /// The length of `src` must be the same as `self`.
- ///
- /// If `src` implements `Copy`, it can be more performant to use
- /// [`copy_from_slice`].
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// This function will panic if the two slices have different lengths.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Cloning two elements from a slice into another:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let src = [1, 2, 3, 4];
- /// let mut dst = [0, 0];
- ///
- /// dst.clone_from_slice(&src[2..]);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(src, [1, 2, 3, 4]);
- /// assert_eq!(dst, [3, 4]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Rust enforces that there can only be one mutable reference with no
- /// immutable references to a particular piece of data in a particular
- /// scope. Because of this, attempting to use `clone_from_slice` on a
- /// single slice will result in a compile failure:
- ///
- /// ```compile_fail
- /// let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
- ///
- /// slice[..2].clone_from_slice(&slice[3..]); // compile fail!
- /// ```
- ///
- /// To work around this, we can use [`split_at_mut`] to create two distinct
- /// sub-slices from a slice:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
- ///
- /// {
- /// let (left, right) = slice.split_at_mut(2);
- /// left.clone_from_slice(&right[1..]);
- /// }
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(slice, [4, 5, 3, 4, 5]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [`copy_from_slice`]: #method.copy_from_slice
- /// [`split_at_mut`]: #method.split_at_mut
- #[stable(feature = "clone_from_slice", since = "1.7.0")]
- pub fn clone_from_slice(&mut self, src: &[T]) where T: Clone {
- core_slice::SliceExt::clone_from_slice(self, src)
- }
-
- /// Copies all elements from `src` into `self`, using a memcpy.
- ///
- /// The length of `src` must be the same as `self`.
- ///
- /// If `src` does not implement `Copy`, use [`clone_from_slice`].
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// This function will panic if the two slices have different lengths.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Copying two elements from a slice into another:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let src = [1, 2, 3, 4];
- /// let mut dst = [0, 0];
- ///
- /// dst.copy_from_slice(&src[2..]);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(src, [1, 2, 3, 4]);
- /// assert_eq!(dst, [3, 4]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Rust enforces that there can only be one mutable reference with no
- /// immutable references to a particular piece of data in a particular
- /// scope. Because of this, attempting to use `copy_from_slice` on a
- /// single slice will result in a compile failure:
- ///
- /// ```compile_fail
- /// let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
- ///
- /// slice[..2].copy_from_slice(&slice[3..]); // compile fail!
- /// ```
- ///
- /// To work around this, we can use [`split_at_mut`] to create two distinct
- /// sub-slices from a slice:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
- ///
- /// {
- /// let (left, right) = slice.split_at_mut(2);
- /// left.copy_from_slice(&right[1..]);
- /// }
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(slice, [4, 5, 3, 4, 5]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [`clone_from_slice`]: #method.clone_from_slice
- /// [`split_at_mut`]: #method.split_at_mut
- #[stable(feature = "copy_from_slice", since = "1.9.0")]
- pub fn copy_from_slice(&mut self, src: &[T]) where T: Copy {
- core_slice::SliceExt::copy_from_slice(self, src)
- }
-
- /// Swaps all elements in `self` with those in `other`.
- ///
- /// The length of `other` must be the same as `self`.
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// This function will panic if the two slices have different lengths.
- ///
- /// # Example
- ///
- /// Swapping two elements across slices:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// #![feature(swap_with_slice)]
- ///
- /// let mut slice1 = [0, 0];
- /// let mut slice2 = [1, 2, 3, 4];
- ///
- /// slice1.swap_with_slice(&mut slice2[2..]);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(slice1, [3, 4]);
- /// assert_eq!(slice2, [1, 2, 0, 0]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Rust enforces that there can only be one mutable reference to a
- /// particular piece of data in a particular scope. Because of this,
- /// attempting to use `swap_with_slice` on a single slice will result in
- /// a compile failure:
- ///
- /// ```compile_fail
- /// #![feature(swap_with_slice)]
- ///
- /// let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
- /// slice[..2].swap_with_slice(&mut slice[3..]); // compile fail!
- /// ```
- ///
- /// To work around this, we can use [`split_at_mut`] to create two distinct
- /// mutable sub-slices from a slice:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// #![feature(swap_with_slice)]
- ///
- /// let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
- ///
- /// {
- /// let (left, right) = slice.split_at_mut(2);
- /// left.swap_with_slice(&mut right[1..]);
- /// }
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(slice, [4, 5, 3, 1, 2]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// [`split_at_mut`]: #method.split_at_mut
- #[unstable(feature = "swap_with_slice", issue = "44030")]
- pub fn swap_with_slice(&mut self, other: &mut [T]) {
- core_slice::SliceExt::swap_with_slice(self, other)
- }
-
- // /// Copies `self` into a new `Vec`.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// let s = [10, 40, 30];
- // /// let x = s.to_vec();
- // /// // Here, `s` and `x` can be modified independently.
- // /// ```
- // #[rustc_conversion_suggestion]
- // #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn to_vec(&self) -> Vec<T>
- // where T: Clone
- // {
- // // NB see hack module in this file
- // hack::to_vec(self)
- // }
-
- // /// Converts `self` into a vector without clones or allocation.
- // ///
- // /// The resulting vector can be converted back into a box via
- // /// `Vec<T>`'s `into_boxed_slice` method.
- // ///
- // /// # Examples
- // ///
- // /// ```
- // /// let s: Box<[i32]> = Box::new([10, 40, 30]);
- // /// let x = s.into_vec();
- // /// // `s` cannot be used anymore because it has been converted into `x`.
- // ///
- // /// assert_eq!(x, vec![10, 40, 30]);
- // /// ```
- // #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn into_vec(self: Box<Self>) -> Vec<T> {
- // // NB see hack module in this file
- // hack::into_vec(self)
- // }
-}
-
-#[lang = "slice_u8"]
-#[cfg(not(test))]
-impl [u8] {
- /// Checks if all bytes in this slice are within the ASCII range.
- #[stable(feature = "ascii_methods_on_intrinsics", since = "1.23.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn is_ascii(&self) -> bool {
- self.iter().all(|b| b.is_ascii())
- }
-
- // /// Returns a vector containing a copy of this slice where each byte
- // /// is mapped to its ASCII upper case equivalent.
- // ///
- // /// ASCII letters 'a' to 'z' are mapped to 'A' to 'Z',
- // /// but non-ASCII letters are unchanged.
- // ///
- // /// To uppercase the value in-place, use [`make_ascii_uppercase`].
- // ///
- // /// [`make_ascii_uppercase`]: #method.make_ascii_uppercase
- // #[stable(feature = "ascii_methods_on_intrinsics", since = "1.23.0")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn to_ascii_uppercase(&self) -> Vec<u8> {
- // let mut me = self.to_vec();
- // me.make_ascii_uppercase();
- // me
- // }
-
- // /// Returns a vector containing a copy of this slice where each byte
- // /// is mapped to its ASCII lower case equivalent.
- // ///
- // /// ASCII letters 'A' to 'Z' are mapped to 'a' to 'z',
- // /// but non-ASCII letters are unchanged.
- // ///
- // /// To lowercase the value in-place, use [`make_ascii_lowercase`].
- // ///
- // /// [`make_ascii_lowercase`]: #method.make_ascii_lowercase
- // #[stable(feature = "ascii_methods_on_intrinsics", since = "1.23.0")]
- // #[inline]
- // pub fn to_ascii_lowercase(&self) -> Vec<u8> {
- // let mut me = self.to_vec();
- // me.make_ascii_lowercase();
- // me
- // }
-
- /// Checks that two slices are an ASCII case-insensitive match.
- ///
- /// Same as `to_ascii_lowercase(a) == to_ascii_lowercase(b)`,
- /// but without allocating and copying temporaries.
- #[stable(feature = "ascii_methods_on_intrinsics", since = "1.23.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn eq_ignore_ascii_case(&self, other: &[u8]) -> bool {
- self.len() == other.len() &&
- self.iter().zip(other).all(|(a, b)| {
- a.eq_ignore_ascii_case(b)
- })
- }
-
- /// Converts this slice to its ASCII upper case equivalent in-place.
- ///
- /// ASCII letters 'a' to 'z' are mapped to 'A' to 'Z',
- /// but non-ASCII letters are unchanged.
- ///
- /// To return a new uppercased value without modifying the existing one, use
- /// [`to_ascii_uppercase`].
- ///
- /// [`to_ascii_uppercase`]: #method.to_ascii_uppercase
- #[stable(feature = "ascii_methods_on_intrinsics", since = "1.23.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn make_ascii_uppercase(&mut self) {
- for byte in self {
- byte.make_ascii_uppercase();
- }
- }
-
- /// Converts this slice to its ASCII lower case equivalent in-place.
- ///
- /// ASCII letters 'A' to 'Z' are mapped to 'a' to 'z',
- /// but non-ASCII letters are unchanged.
- ///
- /// To return a new lowercased value without modifying the existing one, use
- /// [`to_ascii_lowercase`].
- ///
- /// [`to_ascii_lowercase`]: #method.to_ascii_lowercase
- #[stable(feature = "ascii_methods_on_intrinsics", since = "1.23.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn make_ascii_lowercase(&mut self) {
- for byte in self {
- byte.make_ascii_lowercase();
- }
- }
-}
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Extension traits for slices over specific kinds of data
diff -ruN orig/std/src/str.rs new/std/src/str.rs
--- orig/std/src/str.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:41.000000000 +0800
+++ new/std/src/str.rs 2018-07-18 23:59:36.000000000 +0800
@@ -44,12 +44,11 @@
use core::str::pattern::{Searcher, ReverseSearcher, DoubleEndedSearcher};
use core::mem;
use core::iter::FusedIterator;
-use std_unicode::str::{UnicodeStr, Utf16Encoder};
// use vec_deque::VecDeque;
// use borrow::{Borrow, ToOwned};
// use string::String;
-use std_unicode;
+// use std_unicode;
// use vec::Vec;
use slice::{SliceConcatExt, SliceIndex};
// use boxed::Box;
@@ -75,9 +74,11 @@
#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
pub use core::str::{from_utf8_unchecked, from_utf8_unchecked_mut, ParseBoolError};
#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
-pub use std_unicode::str::SplitWhitespace;
+pub use core::str::SplitWhitespace;
#[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
pub use core::str::pattern;
+#[stable(feature = "encode_utf16", since = "1.8.0")]
+pub use core::str::EncodeUtf16;
// #[unstable(feature = "slice_concat_ext",
@@ -135,46 +136,6 @@
// }
// }
-/// An iterator of [`u16`] over the string encoded as UTF-16.
-///
-/// [`u16`]: ../../std/primitive.u16.html
-///
-/// This struct is created by the [`encode_utf16`] method on [`str`].
-/// See its documentation for more.
-///
-/// [`encode_utf16`]: ../../std/primitive.str.html#method.encode_utf16
-/// [`str`]: ../../std/primitive.str.html
-#[derive(Clone)]
-#[stable(feature = "encode_utf16", since = "1.8.0")]
-pub struct EncodeUtf16<'a> {
- encoder: Utf16Encoder<Chars<'a>>,
-}
-
-#[stable(feature = "collection_debug", since = "1.17.0")]
-impl<'a> fmt::Debug for EncodeUtf16<'a> {
- fn fmt(&self, f: &mut fmt::Formatter) -> fmt::Result {
- f.pad("EncodeUtf16 { .. }")
- }
-}
-
-#[stable(feature = "encode_utf16", since = "1.8.0")]
-impl<'a> Iterator for EncodeUtf16<'a> {
- type Item = u16;
-
- #[inline]
- fn next(&mut self) -> Option<u16> {
- self.encoder.next()
- }
-
- #[inline]
- fn size_hint(&self) -> (usize, Option<usize>) {
- self.encoder.size_hint()
- }
-}
-
-#[unstable(feature = "fused", issue = "35602")]
-impl<'a> FusedIterator for EncodeUtf16<'a> {}
-
// #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
// impl Borrow<str> for String {
// #[inline]
@@ -198,1606 +159,9 @@
// }
/// Methods for string slices.
-#[lang = "str"]
+#[lang = "str_alloc"]
#[cfg(not(test))]
impl str {
- /// Returns the length of `self`.
- ///
- /// This length is in bytes, not [`char`]s or graphemes. In other words,
- /// it may not be what a human considers the length of the string.
- ///
- /// [`char`]: primitive.char.html
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let len = "foo".len();
- /// assert_eq!(3, len);
- ///
- /// let len = "ƒoo".len(); // fancy f!
- /// assert_eq!(4, len);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn len(&self) -> usize {
- core_str::StrExt::len(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if `self` has a length of zero bytes.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "";
- /// assert!(s.is_empty());
- ///
- /// let s = "not empty";
- /// assert!(!s.is_empty());
- /// ```
- #[inline]
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- pub fn is_empty(&self) -> bool {
- core_str::StrExt::is_empty(self)
- }
-
- /// Checks that `index`-th byte lies at the start and/or end of a
- /// UTF-8 code point sequence.
- ///
- /// The start and end of the string (when `index == self.len()`) are
- /// considered to be
- /// boundaries.
- ///
- /// Returns `false` if `index` is greater than `self.len()`.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- /// assert!(s.is_char_boundary(0));
- /// // start of `老`
- /// assert!(s.is_char_boundary(6));
- /// assert!(s.is_char_boundary(s.len()));
- ///
- /// // second byte of `ö`
- /// assert!(!s.is_char_boundary(2));
- ///
- /// // third byte of `老`
- /// assert!(!s.is_char_boundary(8));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "is_char_boundary", since = "1.9.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn is_char_boundary(&self, index: usize) -> bool {
- core_str::StrExt::is_char_boundary(self, index)
- }
-
- /// Converts a string slice to a byte slice. To convert the byte slice back
- /// into a string slice, use the [`str::from_utf8`] function.
- ///
- /// [`str::from_utf8`]: ./str/fn.from_utf8.html
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let bytes = "bors".as_bytes();
- /// assert_eq!(b"bors", bytes);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline(always)]
- pub fn as_bytes(&self) -> &[u8] {
- core_str::StrExt::as_bytes(self)
- }
-
- /// Converts a mutable string slice to a mutable byte slice. To convert the
- /// mutable byte slice back into a mutable string slice, use the
- /// [`str::from_utf8_mut`] function.
- ///
- /// [`str::from_utf8_mut`]: ./str/fn.from_utf8_mut.html
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut s = String::from("Hello");
- /// let bytes = unsafe { s.as_bytes_mut() };
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(b"Hello", bytes);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Mutability:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut s = String::from("🗻∈🌏");
- ///
- /// unsafe {
- /// let bytes = s.as_bytes_mut();
- ///
- /// bytes[0] = 0xF0;
- /// bytes[1] = 0x9F;
- /// bytes[2] = 0x8D;
- /// bytes[3] = 0x94;
- /// }
- ///
- /// assert_eq!("🍔∈🌏", s);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "str_mut_extras", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline(always)]
- pub unsafe fn as_bytes_mut(&mut self) -> &mut [u8] {
- core_str::StrExt::as_bytes_mut(self)
- }
-
- /// Converts a string slice to a raw pointer.
- ///
- /// As string slices are a slice of bytes, the raw pointer points to a
- /// [`u8`]. This pointer will be pointing to the first byte of the string
- /// slice.
- ///
- /// [`u8`]: primitive.u8.html
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Hello";
- /// let ptr = s.as_ptr();
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn as_ptr(&self) -> *const u8 {
- core_str::StrExt::as_ptr(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns a subslice of `str`.
- ///
- /// This is the non-panicking alternative to indexing the `str`. Returns
- /// [`None`] whenever equivalent indexing operation would panic.
- ///
- /// [`None`]: option/enum.Option.html#variant.None
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = String::from("🗻∈🌏");
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some("🗻"), v.get(0..4));
- ///
- /// // indices not on UTF-8 sequence boundaries
- /// assert!(v.get(1..).is_none());
- /// assert!(v.get(..8).is_none());
- ///
- /// // out of bounds
- /// assert!(v.get(..42).is_none());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "str_checked_slicing", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn get<I: SliceIndex<str>>(&self, i: I) -> Option<&I::Output> {
- core_str::StrExt::get(self, i)
- }
-
- /// Returns a mutable subslice of `str`.
- ///
- /// This is the non-panicking alternative to indexing the `str`. Returns
- /// [`None`] whenever equivalent indexing operation would panic.
- ///
- /// [`None`]: option/enum.Option.html#variant.None
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = String::from("hello");
- /// // correct length
- /// assert!(v.get_mut(0..5).is_some());
- /// // out of bounds
- /// assert!(v.get_mut(..42).is_none());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("he"), v.get_mut(0..2).map(|v| &*v));
- ///
- /// assert_eq!("hello", v);
- /// {
- /// let s = v.get_mut(0..2);
- /// let s = s.map(|s| {
- /// s.make_ascii_uppercase();
- /// &*s
- /// });
- /// assert_eq!(Some("HE"), s);
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!("HEllo", v);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "str_checked_slicing", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn get_mut<I: SliceIndex<str>>(&mut self, i: I) -> Option<&mut I::Output> {
- core_str::StrExt::get_mut(self, i)
- }
-
- /// Returns a unchecked subslice of `str`.
- ///
- /// This is the unchecked alternative to indexing the `str`.
- ///
- /// # Safety
- ///
- /// Callers of this function are responsible that these preconditions are
- /// satisfied:
- ///
- /// * The starting index must come before the ending index;
- /// * Indexes must be within bounds of the original slice;
- /// * Indexes must lie on UTF-8 sequence boundaries.
- ///
- /// Failing that, the returned string slice may reference invalid memory or
- /// violate the invariants communicated by the `str` type.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v = "🗻∈🌏";
- /// unsafe {
- /// assert_eq!("🗻", v.get_unchecked(0..4));
- /// assert_eq!("∈", v.get_unchecked(4..7));
- /// assert_eq!("🌏", v.get_unchecked(7..11));
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "str_checked_slicing", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub unsafe fn get_unchecked<I: SliceIndex<str>>(&self, i: I) -> &I::Output {
- core_str::StrExt::get_unchecked(self, i)
- }
-
- /// Returns a mutable, unchecked subslice of `str`.
- ///
- /// This is the unchecked alternative to indexing the `str`.
- ///
- /// # Safety
- ///
- /// Callers of this function are responsible that these preconditions are
- /// satisfied:
- ///
- /// * The starting index must come before the ending index;
- /// * Indexes must be within bounds of the original slice;
- /// * Indexes must lie on UTF-8 sequence boundaries.
- ///
- /// Failing that, the returned string slice may reference invalid memory or
- /// violate the invariants communicated by the `str` type.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut v = String::from("🗻∈🌏");
- /// unsafe {
- /// assert_eq!("🗻", v.get_unchecked_mut(0..4));
- /// assert_eq!("∈", v.get_unchecked_mut(4..7));
- /// assert_eq!("🌏", v.get_unchecked_mut(7..11));
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "str_checked_slicing", since = "1.20.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub unsafe fn get_unchecked_mut<I: SliceIndex<str>>(&mut self, i: I) -> &mut I::Output {
- core_str::StrExt::get_unchecked_mut(self, i)
- }
-
- /// Creates a string slice from another string slice, bypassing safety
- /// checks.
- ///
- /// This is generally not recommended, use with caution! For a safe
- /// alternative see [`str`] and [`Index`].
- ///
- /// [`str`]: primitive.str.html
- /// [`Index`]: ops/trait.Index.html
- ///
- /// This new slice goes from `begin` to `end`, including `begin` but
- /// excluding `end`.
- ///
- /// To get a mutable string slice instead, see the
- /// [`slice_mut_unchecked`] method.
- ///
- /// [`slice_mut_unchecked`]: #method.slice_mut_unchecked
- ///
- /// # Safety
- ///
- /// Callers of this function are responsible that three preconditions are
- /// satisfied:
- ///
- /// * `begin` must come before `end`.
- /// * `begin` and `end` must be byte positions within the string slice.
- /// * `begin` and `end` must lie on UTF-8 sequence boundaries.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- ///
- /// unsafe {
- /// assert_eq!("Löwe 老虎 Léopard", s.slice_unchecked(0, 21));
- /// }
- ///
- /// let s = "Hello, world!";
- ///
- /// unsafe {
- /// assert_eq!("world", s.slice_unchecked(7, 12));
- /// }
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub unsafe fn slice_unchecked(&self, begin: usize, end: usize) -> &str {
- core_str::StrExt::slice_unchecked(self, begin, end)
- }
-
- /// Creates a string slice from another string slice, bypassing safety
- /// checks.
- /// This is generally not recommended, use with caution! For a safe
- /// alternative see [`str`] and [`IndexMut`].
- ///
- /// [`str`]: primitive.str.html
- /// [`IndexMut`]: ops/trait.IndexMut.html
- ///
- /// This new slice goes from `begin` to `end`, including `begin` but
- /// excluding `end`.
- ///
- /// To get an immutable string slice instead, see the
- /// [`slice_unchecked`] method.
- ///
- /// [`slice_unchecked`]: #method.slice_unchecked
- ///
- /// # Safety
- ///
- /// Callers of this function are responsible that three preconditions are
- /// satisfied:
- ///
- /// * `begin` must come before `end`.
- /// * `begin` and `end` must be byte positions within the string slice.
- /// * `begin` and `end` must lie on UTF-8 sequence boundaries.
- #[stable(feature = "str_slice_mut", since = "1.5.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub unsafe fn slice_mut_unchecked(&mut self, begin: usize, end: usize) -> &mut str {
- core_str::StrExt::slice_mut_unchecked(self, begin, end)
- }
-
- /// Divide one string slice into two at an index.
- ///
- /// The argument, `mid`, should be a byte offset from the start of the
- /// string. It must also be on the boundary of a UTF-8 code point.
- ///
- /// The two slices returned go from the start of the string slice to `mid`,
- /// and from `mid` to the end of the string slice.
- ///
- /// To get mutable string slices instead, see the [`split_at_mut`]
- /// method.
- ///
- /// [`split_at_mut`]: #method.split_at_mut
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `mid` is not on a UTF-8 code point boundary, or if it is
- /// beyond the last code point of the string slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Per Martin-Löf";
- ///
- /// let (first, last) = s.split_at(3);
- ///
- /// assert_eq!("Per", first);
- /// assert_eq!(" Martin-Löf", last);
- /// ```
- #[inline]
- #[stable(feature = "str_split_at", since = "1.4.0")]
- pub fn split_at(&self, mid: usize) -> (&str, &str) {
- core_str::StrExt::split_at(self, mid)
- }
-
- /// Divide one mutable string slice into two at an index.
- ///
- /// The argument, `mid`, should be a byte offset from the start of the
- /// string. It must also be on the boundary of a UTF-8 code point.
- ///
- /// The two slices returned go from the start of the string slice to `mid`,
- /// and from `mid` to the end of the string slice.
- ///
- /// To get immutable string slices instead, see the [`split_at`] method.
- ///
- /// [`split_at`]: #method.split_at
- ///
- /// # Panics
- ///
- /// Panics if `mid` is not on a UTF-8 code point boundary, or if it is
- /// beyond the last code point of the string slice.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut s = "Per Martin-Löf".to_string();
- /// {
- /// let (first, last) = s.split_at_mut(3);
- /// first.make_ascii_uppercase();
- /// assert_eq!("PER", first);
- /// assert_eq!(" Martin-Löf", last);
- /// }
- /// assert_eq!("PER Martin-Löf", s);
- /// ```
- #[inline]
- #[stable(feature = "str_split_at", since = "1.4.0")]
- pub fn split_at_mut(&mut self, mid: usize) -> (&mut str, &mut str) {
- core_str::StrExt::split_at_mut(self, mid)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator over the [`char`]s of a string slice.
- ///
- /// As a string slice consists of valid UTF-8, we can iterate through a
- /// string slice by [`char`]. This method returns such an iterator.
- ///
- /// It's important to remember that [`char`] represents a Unicode Scalar
- /// Value, and may not match your idea of what a 'character' is. Iteration
- /// over grapheme clusters may be what you actually want.
- ///
- /// [`char`]: primitive.char.html
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let word = "goodbye";
- ///
- /// let count = word.chars().count();
- /// assert_eq!(7, count);
- ///
- /// let mut chars = word.chars();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some('g'), chars.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some('o'), chars.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some('o'), chars.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some('d'), chars.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some('b'), chars.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some('y'), chars.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some('e'), chars.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, chars.next());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Remember, [`char`]s may not match your human intuition about characters:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let y = "y̆";
- ///
- /// let mut chars = y.chars();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some('y'), chars.next()); // not 'y̆'
- /// assert_eq!(Some('\u{0306}'), chars.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, chars.next());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn chars(&self) -> Chars {
- core_str::StrExt::chars(self)
- }
- /// Returns an iterator over the [`char`]s of a string slice, and their
- /// positions.
- ///
- /// As a string slice consists of valid UTF-8, we can iterate through a
- /// string slice by [`char`]. This method returns an iterator of both
- /// these [`char`]s, as well as their byte positions.
- ///
- /// The iterator yields tuples. The position is first, the [`char`] is
- /// second.
- ///
- /// [`char`]: primitive.char.html
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let word = "goodbye";
- ///
- /// let count = word.char_indices().count();
- /// assert_eq!(7, count);
- ///
- /// let mut char_indices = word.char_indices();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some((0, 'g')), char_indices.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some((1, 'o')), char_indices.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some((2, 'o')), char_indices.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some((3, 'd')), char_indices.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some((4, 'b')), char_indices.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some((5, 'y')), char_indices.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some((6, 'e')), char_indices.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, char_indices.next());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Remember, [`char`]s may not match your human intuition about characters:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let yes = "y̆es";
- ///
- /// let mut char_indices = yes.char_indices();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some((0, 'y')), char_indices.next()); // not (0, 'y̆')
- /// assert_eq!(Some((1, '\u{0306}')), char_indices.next());
- ///
- /// // note the 3 here - the last character took up two bytes
- /// assert_eq!(Some((3, 'e')), char_indices.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some((4, 's')), char_indices.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, char_indices.next());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn char_indices(&self) -> CharIndices {
- core_str::StrExt::char_indices(self)
- }
-
- /// An iterator over the bytes of a string slice.
- ///
- /// As a string slice consists of a sequence of bytes, we can iterate
- /// through a string slice by byte. This method returns such an iterator.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut bytes = "bors".bytes();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some(b'b'), bytes.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some(b'o'), bytes.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some(b'r'), bytes.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some(b's'), bytes.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, bytes.next());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn bytes(&self) -> Bytes {
- core_str::StrExt::bytes(self)
- }
-
- /// Split a string slice by whitespace.
- ///
- /// The iterator returned will return string slices that are sub-slices of
- /// the original string slice, separated by any amount of whitespace.
- ///
- /// 'Whitespace' is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived
- /// Core Property `White_Space`.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut iter = "A few words".split_whitespace();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some("A"), iter.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("few"), iter.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("words"), iter.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, iter.next());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// All kinds of whitespace are considered:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let mut iter = " Mary had\ta\u{2009}little \n\t lamb".split_whitespace();
- /// assert_eq!(Some("Mary"), iter.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("had"), iter.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("a"), iter.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("little"), iter.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("lamb"), iter.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, iter.next());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "split_whitespace", since = "1.1.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split_whitespace(&self) -> SplitWhitespace {
- UnicodeStr::split_whitespace(self)
- }
-
- /// An iterator over the lines of a string, as string slices.
- ///
- /// Lines are ended with either a newline (`\n`) or a carriage return with
- /// a line feed (`\r\n`).
- ///
- /// The final line ending is optional.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let text = "foo\r\nbar\n\nbaz\n";
- /// let mut lines = text.lines();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some("foo"), lines.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("bar"), lines.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some(""), lines.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("baz"), lines.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, lines.next());
- /// ```
- ///
- /// The final line ending isn't required:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let text = "foo\nbar\n\r\nbaz";
- /// let mut lines = text.lines();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(Some("foo"), lines.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("bar"), lines.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some(""), lines.next());
- /// assert_eq!(Some("baz"), lines.next());
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(None, lines.next());
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn lines(&self) -> Lines {
- core_str::StrExt::lines(self)
- }
-
- /// An iterator over the lines of a string.
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[rustc_deprecated(since = "1.4.0", reason = "use lines() instead now")]
- #[inline]
- #[allow(deprecated)]
- pub fn lines_any(&self) -> LinesAny {
- core_str::StrExt::lines_any(self)
- }
-
- /// Returns an iterator of `u16` over the string encoded as UTF-16.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let text = "Zażółć gęślą jaźń";
- ///
- /// let utf8_len = text.len();
- /// let utf16_len = text.encode_utf16().count();
- ///
- /// assert!(utf16_len <= utf8_len);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "encode_utf16", since = "1.8.0")]
- pub fn encode_utf16(&self) -> EncodeUtf16 {
- EncodeUtf16 { encoder: Utf16Encoder::new(self[..].chars()) }
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if the given pattern matches a sub-slice of
- /// this string slice.
- ///
- /// Returns `false` if it does not.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let bananas = "bananas";
- ///
- /// assert!(bananas.contains("nana"));
- /// assert!(!bananas.contains("apples"));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn contains<'a, P: Pattern<'a>>(&'a self, pat: P) -> bool {
- core_str::StrExt::contains(self, pat)
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if the given pattern matches a prefix of this
- /// string slice.
- ///
- /// Returns `false` if it does not.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let bananas = "bananas";
- ///
- /// assert!(bananas.starts_with("bana"));
- /// assert!(!bananas.starts_with("nana"));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- pub fn starts_with<'a, P: Pattern<'a>>(&'a self, pat: P) -> bool {
- core_str::StrExt::starts_with(self, pat)
- }
-
- /// Returns `true` if the given pattern matches a suffix of this
- /// string slice.
- ///
- /// Returns `false` if it does not.
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Basic usage:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let bananas = "bananas";
- ///
- /// assert!(bananas.ends_with("anas"));
- /// assert!(!bananas.ends_with("nana"));
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- pub fn ends_with<'a, P: Pattern<'a>>(&'a self, pat: P) -> bool
- where P::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>
- {
- core_str::StrExt::ends_with(self, pat)
- }
-
- /// Returns the byte index of the first character of this string slice that
- /// matches the pattern.
- ///
- /// Returns [`None`] if the pattern doesn't match.
- ///
- /// The pattern can be a `&str`, [`char`], or a closure that determines if
- /// a character matches.
- ///
- /// [`char`]: primitive.char.html
- /// [`None`]: option/enum.Option.html#variant.None
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Simple patterns:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.find('L'), Some(0));
- /// assert_eq!(s.find('é'), Some(14));
- /// assert_eq!(s.find("Léopard"), Some(13));
- /// ```
- ///
- /// More complex patterns using point-free style and closures:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.find(char::is_whitespace), Some(5));
- /// assert_eq!(s.find(char::is_lowercase), Some(1));
- /// assert_eq!(s.find(|c: char| c.is_whitespace() || c.is_lowercase()), Some(1));
- /// assert_eq!(s.find(|c: char| (c < 'o') && (c > 'a')), Some(4));
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Not finding the pattern:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- /// let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.find(x), None);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn find<'a, P: Pattern<'a>>(&'a self, pat: P) -> Option<usize> {
- core_str::StrExt::find(self, pat)
- }
-
- /// Returns the byte index of the last character of this string slice that
- /// matches the pattern.
- ///
- /// Returns [`None`] if the pattern doesn't match.
- ///
- /// The pattern can be a `&str`, [`char`], or a closure that determines if
- /// a character matches.
- ///
- /// [`char`]: primitive.char.html
- /// [`None`]: option/enum.Option.html#variant.None
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Simple patterns:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.rfind('L'), Some(13));
- /// assert_eq!(s.rfind('é'), Some(14));
- /// ```
- ///
- /// More complex patterns with closures:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.rfind(char::is_whitespace), Some(12));
- /// assert_eq!(s.rfind(char::is_lowercase), Some(20));
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Not finding the pattern:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
- /// let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(s.rfind(x), None);
- /// ```
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn rfind<'a, P: Pattern<'a>>(&'a self, pat: P) -> Option<usize>
- where P::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>
- {
- core_str::StrExt::rfind(self, pat)
- }
-
- /// An iterator over substrings of this string slice, separated by
- /// characters matched by a pattern.
- ///
- /// The pattern can be a `&str`, [`char`], or a closure that determines the
- /// split.
- ///
- /// # Iterator behavior
- ///
- /// The returned iterator will be a [`DoubleEndedIterator`] if the pattern
- /// allows a reverse search and forward/reverse search yields the same
- /// elements. This is true for, eg, [`char`] but not for `&str`.
- ///
- /// [`DoubleEndedIterator`]: iter/trait.DoubleEndedIterator.html
- ///
- /// If the pattern allows a reverse search but its results might differ
- /// from a forward search, the [`rsplit`] method can be used.
- ///
- /// [`char`]: primitive.char.html
- /// [`rsplit`]: #method.rsplit
- ///
- /// # Examples
- ///
- /// Simple patterns:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v: Vec<&str> = "Mary had a little lamb".split(' ').collect();
- /// assert_eq!(v, ["Mary", "had", "a", "little", "lamb"]);
- ///
- /// let v: Vec<&str> = "".split('X').collect();
- /// assert_eq!(v, [""]);
- ///
- /// let v: Vec<&str> = "lionXXtigerXleopard".split('X').collect();
- /// assert_eq!(v, ["lion", "", "tiger", "leopard"]);
- ///
- /// let v: Vec<&str> = "lion::tiger::leopard".split("::").collect();
- /// assert_eq!(v, ["lion", "tiger", "leopard"]);
- ///
- /// let v: Vec<&str> = "abc1def2ghi".split(char::is_numeric).collect();
- /// assert_eq!(v, ["abc", "def", "ghi"]);
- ///
- /// let v: Vec<&str> = "lionXtigerXleopard".split(char::is_uppercase).collect();
- /// assert_eq!(v, ["lion", "tiger", "leopard"]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// A more complex pattern, using a closure:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let v: Vec<&str> = "abc1defXghi".split(|c| c == '1' || c == 'X').collect();
- /// assert_eq!(v, ["abc", "def", "ghi"]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// If a string contains multiple contiguous separators, you will end up
- /// with empty strings in the output:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = "||||a||b|c".to_string();
- /// let d: Vec<_> = x.split('|').collect();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(d, &["", "", "", "", "a", "", "b", "c"]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Contiguous separators are separated by the empty string.
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = "(///)".to_string();
- /// let d: Vec<_> = x.split('/').collect();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(d, &["(", "", "", ")"]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Separators at the start or end of a string are neighbored
- /// by empty strings.
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let d: Vec<_> = "010".split("0").collect();
- /// assert_eq!(d, &["", "1", ""]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// When the empty string is used as a separator, it separates
- /// every character in the string, along with the beginning
- /// and end of the string.
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let f: Vec<_> = "rust".split("").collect();
- /// assert_eq!(f, &["", "r", "u", "s", "t", ""]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Contiguous separators can lead to possibly surprising behavior
- /// when whitespace is used as the separator. This code is correct:
- ///
- /// ```
- /// let x = " a b c".to_string();
- /// let d: Vec<_> = x.split(' ').collect();
- ///
- /// assert_eq!(d, &["", "", "", "", "a", "", "b", "c"]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// It does _not_ give you:
- ///
- /// ```,ignore
- /// assert_eq!(d, &["a", "b", "c"]);
- /// ```
- ///
- /// Use [`split_whitespace`] for this behavior.
- ///
- /// [`split_whitespace`]: #method.split_whitespace
- #[stable(feature = "rust1", since = "1.0.0")]
- #[inline]
- pub fn split<'a, P: Pattern<'a>>(&'a self, pat: P) -> Split<'a, P> {
- core_str::StrExt::split(self, pat)
- }
-
- /// An iterator over substrings of the given string slice, separated by
- /// characters matched by a pattern and yielded in reverse order.
- ///
- /// The pattern can be a `&str`, [`char`], or a closure that determines the
- /// split.
- ///
- /// [`char`]: primitive.char.html
- ///
- /// # Iterator behavior
- ///
- /// The returned iterator requires that the pattern supports a reverse
- /// search, and it will be a [`DoubleEndedIterator`] if a forward/reverse
- /// search yields the same elements.
- ///
- /// [`DoubleEndedIterator`]: iter/trait.DoubleEndedIterator.html
- ///