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alvyynm / clean_code.md
Created May 7, 2022 00:20 — forked from wojteklu/clean_code.md
Summary of 'Clean code' by Robert C. Martin

Code is clean if it can be understood easily – by everyone on the team. Clean code can be read and enhanced by a developer other than its original author. With understandability comes readability, changeability, extensibility and maintainability.


General rules

  1. Follow standard conventions.
  2. Keep it simple stupid. Simpler is always better. Reduce complexity as much as possible.
  3. Boy scout rule. Leave the campground cleaner than you found it.
  4. Always find root cause. Always look for the root cause of a problem.

Design rules

@BjornDCode
BjornDCode / gist:5cb836a6b23638d6d02f5cb6ed59a04a
Created February 3, 2020 11:58
Tailwind - Fixed sidebar, scrollable content
// Source: https://twitter.com/calebporzio/status/1151876736931549185
<div class="flex">
<aside class="h-screen sticky top-0">
// Fixed Sidebar
</aside>
<main>
// Content
</main>
@luismts
luismts / GitCommitBestPractices.md
Last active April 15, 2024 09:00
Git Tips and Git Commit Best Practices

Git Commit Best Practices

Basic Rules

Commit Related Changes

A commit should be a wrapper for related changes. For example, fixing two different bugs should produce two separate commits. Small commits make it easier for other developers to understand the changes and roll them back if something went wrong. With tools like the staging area and the ability to stage only parts of a file, Git makes it easy to create very granular commits.

Commit Often

Committing often keeps your commits small and, again, helps you commit only related changes. Moreover, it allows you to share your code more frequently with others. That way it‘s easier for everyone to integrate changes regularly and avoid having merge conflicts. Having large commits and sharing them infrequently, in contrast, makes it hard to solve conflicts.

@wojteklu
wojteklu / clean_code.md
Last active April 19, 2024 18:00
Summary of 'Clean code' by Robert C. Martin

Code is clean if it can be understood easily – by everyone on the team. Clean code can be read and enhanced by a developer other than its original author. With understandability comes readability, changeability, extensibility and maintainability.


General rules

  1. Follow standard conventions.
  2. Keep it simple stupid. Simpler is always better. Reduce complexity as much as possible.
  3. Boy scout rule. Leave the campground cleaner than you found it.
  4. Always find root cause. Always look for the root cause of a problem.

Design rules

## How to hide API keys from github ##
1. If you have already pushed commits with sensitive data, follow this guide to remove the sensitive info while
retaining your commits: https://help.github.com/articles/remove-sensitive-data/
2. In the terminal, create a config.js file and open it up:
touch config.js
atom config.js
@vasanthk
vasanthk / System Design.md
Last active April 19, 2024 15:40
System Design Cheatsheet

System Design Cheatsheet

Picking the right architecture = Picking the right battles + Managing trade-offs

Basic Steps

  1. Clarify and agree on the scope of the system
  • User cases (description of sequences of events that, taken together, lead to a system doing something useful)
    • Who is going to use it?
    • How are they going to use it?