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"PropertyId","SpecialInfo","ProgramInfo","HistoricalInfo","Phone","AltProperty"
"1","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Cherry Blossom Park"
"2","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Cherry Park"
"5","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Chimney Park was once the site of the city's incinerator. The park acquired its name from the incinerator's chimney, which has since been removed.","","Chimney Park"
"8","Go to <a href="http://www.portlandchinesegarden.org/" target="_blank">www.portlandchinesegarden.org</a> for visitor information.","","","5032288131","Lan Su Chinese Garden"
"9","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Clinton Community Garden"
"10","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","Clinton Park is named after Clinton Street which abuts the park. Clinton Street is named for a popular pioneer minister, the Rev. Clinton Kelly. Kelly's brother, the Rev. Albert Kelly, has a park in southwest Portland as his namesake (Albert Kelly Park).","","Clinton Park"
"11","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Colonel Summers Community Garden"
"12","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, please call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","Originally called Belmont Park, this site was renamed in 1938 in honor of Colonel Owen Summers, a former member of the Oregon Legislature. Summers was the commanding officer of the Second Oregon Volunteers Regiment in the Spanish-American War. He also introduced the bill which later created the Oregon National Guard.
 
In the southwest corner of this park there is a huge rock, which came from Kelly Butte. This rock holds a bas relief image of Colonel Summers on a bronze plaque.","","Colonel Summers Park"
"15","","","In 1900, the area along the Columbia River northeast of Portland was primarily farmland. It flooded every spring with heavy rainfall and melting mountain snows. In the dry summer and fall, water remained in shallow lakes and narrow sloughs. The land between the waterways formed great meadows surrounded by massive cottonwoods and other riparian plants.
 
John Charles Olmsted looked at this land with foresight. Although most considered it valueless for any other purpose than farming, he proposed acquiring a large acreage in the Columbia Slough region for future parkland. He wrote about the potential of this landscape as a contrast to the hills and river frontages in other parts of town to provide ". . . great stretches of meadow land bordered and diversified by groves of trees. No other form of park has ever proved so attractive and so useful to the masses of the people as the meadow park, particularly when there can be associated with it long reaches of still water as a landscape attraction and for boating purposes."
 
Olmsted proposed that Columbia Slough Park would not only provide still waters for boaters unsure of the Willamette River's strong currents, but also broad meadows for recreation such as picnicking, strolling, fast driving, horse racing (as long as gambling could be prevented), and golfing if it should retain its popularity. He suggested that the City secure hundreds to several thousand acres while this land remained inexpensive because of its regular flooding and its great distance from city development.
 
The land Olmsted proposed for Columbia Slough Park surrounds Switzler’s Lake. Much of this land was farmed by a family named Delminico in the early 20th century. Along with other farmers in the area, they built the original levees between 1917-1919 to reduce yearly flooding from the river. By 1920, enough families had moved into the area that an educational facility was needed for the neighborhood children. Columbia School District #33 was organized and land was purchased for a grade school and high school along NE Sixth Ave. An elementary school was built on the property located at the corner of Sixth Ave and NW South Shore Rd. The high school property one block west, which was never developed, is now the Columbia Children’s Arboretum. The Columbia School District was annexed by Faloma District #33 in 1935, then reorganized as Columbia District #33 again in 1944. Portland Public Schools finally annexed the land and school in 1964.
 
When Portland School District acquired Columbia School, it was designated as a middle school. The local youth who attended the school were primarily a very transient population, well below the city average in both education achievement and economic levels. In a goal to strengthen the basic curriculum through science-centered projects, Principal Bill Warner proposed a new program titled Growth through Research, Organization & Work (GROW). Students studied math, language arts, social studies, health, and science as they worked on the 28-acre site that became known as the Columbia Children’s Arboretum.
 
The land started out as a tangle of blackberries in 1965, but by 1970, students and families had planted 8,000 trees. Students began by planning three different scenarios for the development of the land. An orchard and organic garden was chosen for the area adjacent to NE Sixth Ave. An arboretum was designed for the land on the south side of the drainage ditch with intentions to solicit and plant trees from every U.S. state. The area furthest from Sixth Ave was planned as a natural area where indigenous plants and animals could provide a tranquil setting for study.
 
Before long, the creation of a garden and arboretum became a community project. Organizations of all sorts began to help the school create its dream. Edward Maddix, a Tigard architect provided construction drawings for the site. Students and staff approached the U.S. Marines for assistance with heavy land moving. Bulldozers were brought in to remove the blackberries and create a pond with an island. The Oregon Association of Nurserymen supplied trees, the Rose Society donated roses for the garden, the pond was stocked with fish by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife, the Rotary Club provided tree labels, and the list goes on. The architect worked with students to design a study shelter that was adopted by Women in Construction. Remnants of the beginning of the shelter still remain, although its construction was limited by the fact that utilities could not be brought to the site.
 
In 1977, Portland Public Schools built a bus barn on the site of the organic farm area. Eventually, changing demographics in northeast Portland reduced the need for Columbia Middle School, and it closed in 1983. Classes at Whitaker School, located three miles from the arboretum, adopted the GROW program in the 1980s and planting increased. However, the distance between the school and Arboretum became a problem and the program only lasted until the early 1990s. A few classrooms around the district continued to use the Arboretum for field trips. The most constant visitors were neighbors from the new housing developments on the east side of the Arboretum. The neighborhood association created a Columbia Children’s Arboretum Preservation Committee to develop goals and activities in the Arboretum. It has sponsored work parties on a monthly basis for over 10 years. In addition, the committee funded aspects of the East Columbia Wetlands Management Plan to include plans for the Arboretum site. The very first Natural Resources Management Plan in the city, it has guided development and promoted the environmental activities for the Arboretum and adjacent areas since 1988.
 
In 1999, Portland Parks & Recreation acquired the Columbia Children’s Arboretum land from Portland Public Schools for use as a park. Now it is time to develop a Master Plan for the site. Portland Parks & Recreation staff look forward to working closely with the community throughout the fall and winter of 2003/04 to create a vision for the Columbia Children’s Arboretum.","","Columbia Children's Arboretum"
"17","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525.
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>","This park has been "adopted" by the Friends of Columbia Park. For information about renting Columbia Cottage, go to <a href="http://www.focp.org" target="_blank">www.focp.org</a>.
 
To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","In 1891, the City of Albina bought a tract of wooded land to be used for Albina's first park, however, it wasn't developed until after Albina consolidated with the City of Portland. In 1909, G.H. Hoch, the head gardener for Washington Park, oversaw the design work for Columbia Park. He patterned the park after a famous park in Berlin, Germany.","","Columbia Park"
"21","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Community-Music-Center-Portland-Parks-Recreation/148344008522687?sk=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=342890" alt="CMC on Facebook" /></a> <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Community-Music-Center-Portland-Parks-Recreation/148344008522687?sk=wall" target="_blank">Find Us on Facebook</a>","Visit the CMC website at <a href="http://www.communitymusiccenter.org" target="_blank">www.communitymusiccenter.org</a> for 2010/11 catalog.
 
<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","PP&R's first music program began in 1955 at the Knott Street (now Matt Dishman) Community Center where guitar classes, as well as a string ensemble and a community orchestra, were offered. A major commitment to music education was made in the late 1950s when all existing music classes were moved to the Woodstock Community Center. Children's music classes were introduced, including music theory and ear-training, and a variety of stringed instruments were taught. As the children's abilities improved, a string ensemble was formed. It was evident that the music program would soon outgrow its new home.
 
Community Music Center, Inc. was founded as a non-profit association in February 1960 by a group of parents and interested citizens. It played a vital role in the remodeling a beautiful 1912 firehouse - the oldest in Portland and designated a Portland Historic Landmark - which became the permanent home of CMC in 1969. That project was made possible by a generous gift from John D. and Elizabeth Gray and the donation of services by architect Robert Oringdulph. Substantial improvements were made to the facility in 1999, bringing the building up to the seismic requirements of the City of Portland, and making the building accessible in accordance with the American Disability Act.","5038233177","Community Music Center"
"22","","","Cottonwood Bay Park is part of the larger Willamette Greenway Trail, and features one of the few remaining stands of cottonwood trees on the west bank of the Willamette River. In the early 1990s, the site was just a tax lot until a developer for the nearby Avalon Hotel approached the City about putting in some amenities. Working together, a natural area was created for the public to enjoy. To complement the natural area, the developer hired a landscape architect to design a native landscape around the hotel.
<p>","","Cottonwood Bay Park"
"23","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","This park is named after Captain John Heard Couch, who first sailed for Portland from Newburyport, Massachusetts in 1839. His first home in Portland was near where Union Station is today, but he owned all the land from the river to approximately NW 23 Avenue and from Burnside north for a mile. Captain Couch developed this land and named the blocks alphabetically (A Street, B Street, and so forth). During the last half of the 1800s, Couch's land was known as the Alphabet District. The captain was a well-liked, civic-minded man, so it's only appropriate that one of Portland's beautiful parks be named in his honor.
 
The site of today's Couch Park was once the estate of 19th century merchant prince Cicero Hunt Lewis, who married Captain Couch's daughter Clementine. The estate consisted of an elegant mansion, stables, and a greenhouse, all of which were built in 1881. The Lewises raised eleven children on these grounds.
 
After the Lewis house was demolished, the Portland School
District acquired the property in 1913 and built a new Couch
School to replace the first one built in 1882 located at NW 17 & Kearney. The block east of the school, now the park, was
used as a playground.
 
In 1970 the Captain John Brown house (built in 1890 at 2035
NW Everett) was moved onto the northeast corner of the site
to save it from demolition. Private citizens donated money to
restore the building as a center for senior citizens and medical
services. A HUD Historic Preservation Agency grant of
$100,000 was insufficient to complete the restoration and when
the additional funds couldn't be raised, the project was
abandoned. By 1973 the house had been severely vandalized
and was finally demolished.
 
Couch School became a special school in 1968 and in 1974 its
name changed to the Metropolitan Learning Center (MLC), leaving
only the park with Couch's name.
 
A master plan process for the park began in 1975 with over twenty community meetings to determine what it would look like. MLC students helped with design ideas and residents of the surrounding neighborhood actually participated in the construction of the park and in the building of its play structure.
 
In 1976, three pieces of artwork where installed in the park: a steel sculpture by David Cotter, mosaic tiles by Jere Grimm, and carved wooden pillars by William Moore, Eric Jensen, and Brent Jenkins that support the playground shelter.","","Couch Park"
"24","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. Closed to motor vehicles at 9:00pm.
 
To reserve a wedding site, please call 503-823-2525.","The Bureau of Technology Services is replacing the tower which will result in some park and trail closures over the next year. For more info, <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/omf/index.cfm?c=48043" target="_blank">click here</a>.","Council Crest is thought to be the highest point in Portland at 1,073 feet above sea level. Originally known as Talbot's Mountain after its pioneer settlers, it has also been known as Glass Hill and later as Fairmount, the name of the road that encircles it. According to legend, Council Crest got its name because it was here where Native Americans held meetings and built signal fires. According to McArthur's <I>Oregon Geographic Names</I>, however, it was named in 1898 by delegates to the National Council of Congregational Churches, who met on the top.
 
The water tower that now stands atop Council Crest used to be a 77-foot-tall wooden observatory, part of the Council Crest Amusement Park which was torn down in 1941. From the top of the hill, one can see five mountains in the Cascade Range: Mt. Hood, Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Adams, Mt. Jefferson, and Mt. Rainier. In addition, the park boasts a fantastic 180 degree view of Portland and surrounding towns.
 
In July 1956, a welded, sheet bronze drinking fountain featuring a mother and child was installed in the park. Sculpted by Frederic Littmann, an associate professor of art at Portland State College, it has been mistakenly identified as a pioneer woman. The sculptor said the statue did not represent a particular era; it was simply a mother and child playing in the park and depicts joy. The fountain was made possible by a $6,000 bequest to the city in 1949 from the estate of Florence Laberee, widow of local builder and contractor George P. Laberee.
 
In the 1980s, the statue was stolen in the middle of the night by vandals who used hacksaws to dismantle it from its base, sawing through the mother's ankles. Nearly 10 years later, during a narcotics raid on a home in northeast Portland, officers found the rusty statue in the backyard under a cover. The statue was re-erected in the center of the park near the entrance, as opposed to its original location on the eastern side of the park.","","Council Crest Park"
"25","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Creston Park"
"27","<I>Garden Hours</I>
April 1-September 30: 6:00am-10:00pm
October 1-March 31: 6:00am-6:00pm
 
<I>Entrance Fees</I>
Admission is free to all from the day after Labor Day through the month of February.
A $3 admission fee is charged between 10:00am-6:00pm, Thursday through Monday, March through Labor Day.
Admission is free for children under 12 and Friends of Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden.
 
All events, including photographic sessions, must be scheduled through the Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden Event Coordinator (503-975-6743). Only one photographic session will be scheduled at a time. Fees are calculated based on size of group and hours reserved.
<I>Directions</I>
The garden is located on SE 28 Avenue, one block north of Woodstock, between Eastmoreland Golf Course and Reed College. Or take TriMet bus #19 Woodstock. This bus takes alternating routes as it goes through Eastmoreland; ask the driver for the stop nearest the garden.","<I>Annual Events</I>
The first Saturday in April is our Early Show with several hundred trusses of early blooming rhododendrons. There is an even larger display on Mother's Day weekend. For more info, call 503-771-8386.
<I>Volunteers</I>
Volunteers from the Portland Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society, the Friends of Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, and the Master Gardeners program care for the grounds and are responsible for all education programs and special events. Regular volunteer work parties take place every Wednesday, February through November. There are also volunteer days on selected Saturdays. New volunteers are always welcome. For more info, call 503-771-8386.
 
<I>Friends of Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden</I>
The Friends, an auxiliary of the Portland Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society, is dedicated to maintaining Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden as a year-round place of great beauty. Friends enjoy free admission for themselves and one guest. Membership applications are available at the gate, or call 503-771-8386.","William S. Ladd, who served two terms as the mayor of Portland in the 1800s, was the original owner of the property. He called it Crystal Springs Farm. The oldest rhododendron in the current garden was planted prior to 1917.
 
The development of a display and test garden was initiated in 1950 by the Portland Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society. Sam Jackson, owner of the Oregon Journal, had donated 27 acres on Terwilliger Blvd for the garden, but the site was deemed unsuitable because of its steep terrain. Claude I. Sersanous, one of the group assigned to select a new site, suggested the garden's present location near Reed College. Referred to as Shakespeare Island by Reed College students because of the Shakespearean plays that had been performed there, it was abandoned and overgrown with brush and blackberries. Through the efforts of Portland Chapter members and other volunteers, and with the support of Park Superintendent C.P. Keyser, the garden flourished. The first rhododendron show was held in 1956, and the garden was officially named Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden in 1964.
 
Originally, the garden was developed as a test garden, which meant that new rhododendrons could be evaluated over a period of several years. Lack of security and adequate protection made this impractical and the concept was dropped. The original garden, on what is now called the Island, was designed by Ruth Hansen, a landscape architect and Portland Chapter member. The portion of the garden known as the Peninsula was designed by Wallace K. Huntington, a well-known Portland landscape architect, and was dedicated in 1977. The rocks used to build the waterfalls and other features were gathered from Mt Hood and Mt Adams.
 
The more than 2,500 rhododendrons, azaleas, and companion plants in the garden have all been donated by volunteers and interested individuals, or purchased with specially donated funds. Beginning in early spring and continuing into summer, they provide a magnificent display of color, giving visitors the opportunity to view many varieties rarely seen in the Pacific Northwest. During the fall, many companion trees add dramatic coloring. Spring-fed Crystal Springs Lake surrounds much of the garden, attracting many species of birds and waterfowl.
<p>","5037718386","Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden"
"28","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Cully Community Garden"
"31","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","This park was named for General George Armstrong Custer, at the time of his promotion the youngest general in the history of the United States Army (Galusha Pennypacker was the youngest during the Civil War). Although he died after making a grave error at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Custer had a substantial national prominence and had been considered a possible presidential candidate.","","Custer Park"
"33","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Dawson Park is named in honor of an Episcopal minister, the Rev. John Dawson, who was an advocate of child welfare and civic improvement in the 1920s. This space was once a cow pasture and then a ballfield used by the Immaculate Heart Church and School. It was also a frequent stopping place for small circuses and medicine shows.
 
The gazebo in the park was built in 1978 to showcase the 120 year-old cupola salvaged from the Hill Block Building, once a cornerstone of the old Albina commercial district and an informal gathering place for the African-American community. The onion-like dome was landmark architecture on the Hill Block Building located on the northwest corner of the intersection of N. Russell & Williams. The building and many others were torn down in the early 1970s to make room for a proposed expansion of the Emanuel Hospital campus. The expansion did not take place due to a cut in federal funds. The gazebo was renovated in 2008.
 
The summer of 2000 saw an increase of criminal activity in the park. A partnership was formed between the Portland Police Bureau, Portland Parks & Recreation, the Eliot Neighborhood Association, Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Immaculate Heart Church, neighbors, and local businesses to address the problem. This community effort resulted in a revitalization of the park, adding amenities like permanent checkers tables and promoting positive activities for all ages.","","Dawson Park"
"34","Park hours: 6:00am-10:00pm
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","Delta Park and the Portland International Raceway were built on the site of the city of Vanport City, which was destroyed by a flood in 1948. Prior to its destruction, Vanport was the second largest city in Oregon. Vanport was constructed in order to house the thousands of war-time shipbuilders that Henry Kaiser, of Henry Kaiser Industries, had recruited from New York to help with the war effort. Vanport, which was constructed in under a year, was deemed 'The Miracle City.' It had its own post office, nine schools, a fire station, a 400-seat cafeteria, a 785-seat theater, a library, a hospital, fourteen playgrounds, five commercial centers, and a police station staffed by twenty-two officers.
 
The problem with this instant city was that the quality of housing and building construction left much to be desired. On Sunday, May 30, 1948, just one day after the general manager of Vanport announced that the city was "not in any foreseeable danger" from rising flood waters, a segment of the ring-like dike surrounding the city collapsed. A 12-foot wall of water rushed through the community, wiping out all of the poorly-constructed houses. The residents were never officially notified that they were in danger.
 
Delta Park has been the site of quite a bit of controversy over the years. In 1964 there were some hotly contested plans to build a domed stadium in the park. Had the plans gone through, the stadium would have been the largest of its kind, with permanent seating for 60,000 and temporary seating up to 80,000. The plans were not approved and we now have a place for all sorts of outdoor activities.","","Delta Park"
"37","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","Dr. DeNorval Unthank (1899-1977) was born in Pennsylvania, raised in Kansas City, and received his medical degree from Howard University in Washington, DC. He moved to Portland in 1929 to start his own practice. He was on the staff of Good Samaritan, Providence, St Vincent, and Emanuel Hospitals. After retiring in 1970, he served as a medical consultant for the state workmen’s compensation board until 1976.
He won several awards for his work against racial discrimination as well as for his public service work. In 1958, the Oregon Medical Society named him Doctor of the Year. For his role in bringing down racial barriers, the city of Portland named this park in his honor in 1969. Unthank was the recipient of several citizenship awards including the distinguished citizenship award from the University of Oregon in 1971 and the citizenship award from Concordia College in 1975. Unthank was the first African American member of the Portland City Club. He was president of the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and cofounder of the Portland Urban League. Unthank sat on Oregon’s Committee for Equal Rights and the Council of Social Agencies. An important figure in the early civil rights movement in Portland, Unthank opened many doors and opportunities for other minorities.","","Unthank Park"
"38","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Francis DeWitt was a pioneer who came to Oregon from Germany in 1847 on a sailing vessel.","","DeWitt Park"
"39","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Dickinson Park"
"44","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","The current site of Duniway Park was once Portland's first Italian settlement colony. The influx of Italians into Portland occurred between 1900 and 1917. In 1918, Duniway Park was named in honor of Abigail Scott Duniway (1836-1915) - writer, newspaper publisher, and advocate for women's right to vote. In 1912, Duniway became the first legal female voter in Multnomah County.
 
In May of 1995, Duniway Park became the site of the first track of its kind. The state-of-the-art track surface is made from recycled rubber, including over 20,000 lbs. of athletic shoe soles donated by Nike, Inc. The old track was reconstituted and applied as the foundation for the new track. The dedication ceremony included three-time New York Marathon winner Alberto Salazar and 100 children running a 'Victory Lap' around the track.
 
The Lilac Garden in Duniway Park is a landfill over what was originally Marquam Gulch. The garden is surrounded by steep hillsides covered with fir and cedar - a wonderful backdrop for lilacs in bloom. There are currently about 225 plants in the garden. Included are over 125 varieties, mostly hybrids of <I>Syringa vulgaris</I> which bloom from late March to early May. Of special interest is a large Japanese Tree Lilac which blooms in June.
 
The majority of lilacs in the garden were grown by B.O. Case, a nurseryman from southeastern Washington. When Case died in 1936, the Portland Garden Club decided to make his collection a gift to the City of Portland. Mrs. Mark M. Thiesen purchased the collection for $2,000 and the Garden Club brought an out-of-state lilac expert to Portland to select a site and design the garden layout.","","Duniway Park"
"45","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","Includes demonstration orchard.","This .09-acre parcel was given to the city by Nina B. Adams in 1968. She had originally purchased the land in order to build her home on it, but later changed her mind and decided that the best use of the property was as public open space. The community garden is located in the northwest corner of the parcel..","5038231612","Adams Community Garden"
"48","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","This park was named for Albert Kelly, an early settler in Oregon. He was born in 1814, in Pulaski County, Kentucky. In 1848, Albert and three of his brothers set out for Oregon. He and brother Clinton got as far as Independence, Missouri, when Albert's livestock were scattered by a storm and lost. Clinton kept on going, but Albert turned back and delayed coming west until the following year
 
Albert first scouted the area now known as Holladay Park, but was discouraged by the lack of a reliable supply of water. Later, he and Finice Caruthers explored the area west of the hills, and found it much more to his liking. Albert made his land claim and in 1850, he and his sons put up a cabin of logs and shakes, and moved into it just in time for the birth of his daughter Martha (later, Mrs. O.P.S. Plummer). Albert and his family farmed the land, and Albert served his church as a circuit-riding minister until his death in 1873.
 
The park came into being in 1956 when Mrs. Hildegarde Plummer Withers offered 9 acres of the family land to then Parks Superintendent Buckley - if it would be dedicated as a park and named after her grandfather, Albert Kelly. The offer was accepted, and for $25,000, the city of Portland took title to the land. Through a series of land swaps and changes in 1959, 1963 and 1965, the park was somewhat reshaped and enlarged to its present size of 12.8 acres.","","Albert Kelly Park"
"49","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","This park is maintained with the volunteer assistance of the <a href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Friends-of-Alberta-Park/" target="_blank">Friends of Alberta Park</a>. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","","","Alberta Park"
"50","","","Ankeny Plaza was once the heart of Portland's entertainment and commerce. The first true public space in the Skidmore-Old Town District, it is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was built on vacated Vine St. and Block 35 on the site of the Bank of British Columbia.
 
The Plaza was updated in the mid-1980s when TriMet's light rail system (MAX) was slated to travel through the area. PP&R was careful to keep the restoration sensitive to its historical backdrop. Donations of original wrought iron and other historic building materials were used in order to restore Ankeny Plaza to its former glory.
 
The Skidmore Fountain is Portland's oldest piece of public art and has been praised as one of the finest fountains in American art. Stephen G. Skidmore, a druggist who arrived in Portland by covered wagon, left $5,000 in his will for a fountain for "men, horses and dogs" (Henry Weinhard offered to pump beer into the fountain for the dedication). His friends raised an additional $18,000 and New York sculptor Olin Levi Warner was commissioned to design it. The fountain was styled after fountains Skidmore viewed on his visit to the 1878 Paris Exposition. It is 14-feet-tall with a bronze basin eight feet in diameter resting on a central granite shaft and two bronze caryatids, classical Grecian female figures. Four stone watering troughs alternate with stone steps leading to the octagonal base, which is inscribed "Good citizens are the riches of a city," a quote from C.E.S. Wood. The troughs fill with water flowing from the fountain through miniature lion heads. In its early days, metal drinking cups were attached by chains to four of the heads. The bronze work was cast by Bureau Bros. of Philadelphia and the base was made of dressed granite from the Franklin quarries in Maine. Although, the plaza was the center of Portland when the fountain was dedicated on September 22, 1888, the New York Tribune implied that the fountain was too fine an achievement "for a western city with its bewhiskered, bepistoled lot of frontiersmen."","","Ankeny Plaza"
"51","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","This park is maintained with the volunteer assistance of the <a href="http://sites.google.com/site/maplewoodneighborhoodportland/parks" target="_blank">Friends of April Hill Park</a>. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","","","April Hill Park"
"52","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","Created by artist Peter Helzer in 1996, <I>Alligator and Otter</I> is a small bronze statue of two animal characters fresh from a summer swim. A plaque with the artist's statement reads: "This sculpture is for all who enjoy the simple pleasures of a beautiful Oregon day. May it serve to remind us of good friends, good times, and good memories."","","Arbor Lodge Park"
"53","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. No parking on park side of street after 10:00pm.
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","This park has been "adopted" by the <a href="http://www.epno.org/argay.htm" target="_blank">Argay Neighborhood Association</a>. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","","","Argay Park"
"55","","","","","Ash Creek Natural Area"
"56","","","","","Beech Property"
"57","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, please call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","Berkeley Park was purchased as part of a 20-acre neighborhood tract in 1941 with funds from a 1938 tax levy. Housing was developed except for a 6.5 acre tract which was designated for a potential park. In 1946, Park Superintendent C.P. Keyser thought Berkeley was too costly to develop. With three sides already having housing, it was thought the area would best be used for additional housing. The neighbors disagreed and petitioned for the property to be developed as a park. The neighborhood succeeded and Berkeley Park was developed.","","Berkeley Park"
"58","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Berrydale Community Garden"
"59","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Berrydale Park"
"60","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Blair Community Garden"
"61","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Bloomington Park"
"63","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","The off-leash area in this park has been "adopted" by the Friends of Brentwood OLA. For more information on the PP&R Adopt A Park program, call 503-823-5121.","","","Brentwood Park"
"67","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","Three large golden granite boulders, situated near the play area, were sculpted into heads by California artist Marcia Donahue. The boulders, each weighing approximately 2-3 tons, were hand-picked by the artist at a ranch near Bakersfield, CA. The sculpture is aptly named Tête à Tête à Tête and serves as the permanent audience for baseball games as well as a gathering place for park visitors. The sculpture was installed in 1996.","","Brooklyn Park"
"68","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>","","","","Brooklyn School Park"
"89","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","Cyrus Buckman was an orchardist in Portland in the late 1800s. He was also a member of the Portland school board and the city council.","5038231612","Buckman Community Garden"
"90","To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Buckman Field"
"92","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Burlingame Park"
"93","This small area of undeveloped Willamette River shoreline, along the Willamette Greenway, is a good example of the natural environment of the river. Many cottonwood trees grow in the wet soil, while different species of birds, insects, and native plants flourish in this nature sanctuary. The park was named 'butterfly' for its importance as a habitat for butterflies. An interpretive sign is located at the entrance to the park.","<a href="http://www.southportlandna.org/southportlandriverbank/" target="_blank">Click here</a> for information on the South Portland Riverbank Project.","","","Butterfly Park"
"97","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The site which now bears the name Cathedral Park is steeped in history. It is believed to be one of the 14 Lewis and Clark landing sites in the Vancouver-Portland area: William Clark and eight men camped there on April 2, 1806. This spot had been a fishing and camping site for many area Indian tribes. In 1847, the founder of St Johns, James John, settled on the site and operated a ferry to Linnton across the Willamette River. In 1931, the St Johns Bridge was built on the site with 400-ft towers and a main span of 1,207 feet. It is the only steel suspension bridge in Portland.
 
In the early 1970s, Howard Galbraith, the "honorary mayor" of unincorporated St Johns, got tired of the junkyard state of the area under the eastern end of the bridge. He organized a drive that eventually raised $7.5 million to build a park. After eight years of community fundraising, combined with state, county and city funding, the park was dedicated at a community celebration on May 3, 1980. It got its name from a photo of the St Johns Bridge by Al Monner that appeared on the front page of the Oregon Journal in 1968. Reference was made to its beautiful cathedral-like arches and the park found its name.
 
In June of 1980, the Cathedral Park Committee sealed a time capsule (complete with ash from Mt St Helens) into the Wall of History in the Memorial Garden in the park. The time capsule will be opened in 2030. Measurements for how to find the capsule (which is covered with a stone that matches the rest of the wall) have been left with the Oregon History Center. Committee chairperson Sharon Roso said, "We want to make sure that in 2030 people will remember there's a celebration due in St Johns."","","Cathedral Park"
"99","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Chapman is one of two courthouse squares that comprise the Plaza Blocks which are bounded by Third and Fourth Avenues and Salmon and Madison Streets. The south square is named for former Iowa territorial legislator and native Virginian William Williams Chapman (1808-1892) who arrived in Portland in 1850. An attorney with business interests, he also served as surveyor general of Oregon. In 1870, he sold this portion of his land claim to the city. The north square is named for Kentuckian Daniel H. Lownsdale, who settled in Portland in 1845 when there were fewer than 800 people living in the city.
 
The Plaza Blocks were lively places where orators held forth and citizens assembled. They are characterized in part by several large old elms and gingko trees. Chapman Square, originally designed for the exclusive use of women and children, features all female gingko trees. Lownsdale Square was to be the "gentlemen's gathering place." Today the Plaza Blocks are still a busy gathering place, although men and women can now safely coexist in either of them.
 
In Chapman Square is a bronze statue commissioned by the Oregon Trail Coordinating Council to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Oregon Trail in 1993. <i>The Promised Land</i>, by Oregon artist David Manuel, depicts a pioneer family - father, mother, and son - at the end of their journey. The red granite slab upon which the statue is mounted is inscribed with a quote by Thomas Jefferson. The plaza in front of the statue is sandblasted with footprints reminiscent of pre-settlement days: jackrabbit, black bear, porcupine, grouse, coyote, elk, and moccasin prints.
 
Between the two Plaza Blocks, Main Street curves around a huge elk fountain given to the city by David P. Thompson. Thompson arrived in Portland driving sheep over the Oregon Trail. He served as Portland's mayor from 1879-1882. One day looked out of the office window in his New Market Building at the Skidmore Fountain and decided that he wanted to dedicate a fountain to the city as well. Thompson commissioned Roland Hinton Perry, whose work adorns the Library of Congress and the dome of the Pennsylvania state capitol, and in 1900 he presented the city with a bronze elk fountain to commemorate elk that once grazed nearby. Local architect H.G. Wright designed the stone base of eastern granite, which included drinking troughs for horses and dogs. The Exalted Order of Elks refused to dedicate it because they considered the statue "a monstrosity of art." Many have tried to have Thompson's elk removed because it can be considered a traffic obstacle, but the elk statue remains. In 1974, after a debate about disturbing the blocks in order to complement the then-new General Services Building, Thompson's elk and the Plaza Blocks were designated as Historic Landmarks.","","Chapman Square"
"101","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Earl Boyles was a beloved janitor at the former Powellhurst Elementary School for 19 years in the 1930s and 40s. On rainy days he would allow cold, wet students to dry by the furnace. When a new elementary school was built in 1956, it was named after him. As of 2000, it remains the only school in Oregon named for a classified employee. When the land adjacent to the school was acquired for a park, there was no question that the park would be named after Earl Boyles as well.","","Earl Boyles Park"
"104","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/East-Portland-Community-Center-Portland-Parks-Recreation/293150185010?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$5.00 - age 18-59
$4.00 - age 60 & up
$4.00 - age 13-17
$3.25 - age 3-12
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Indoor, 4-lane 25-yard lap pool heated to 84 degrees, 3-lane 20-yard lap section heated to 88 degreesand, whirlpool spa heated to 102 degrees. Leisure pool with 2 slides, current channel & vortex. Water depths range from zero depth entry to 9 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
 
<b>Cherry Blossom Senior Program</b>
Looking for new friends, new activities or a way to become part of the community? The Cherry Blossom Senior Program at EPCC just might be for you! Jointly sponsored by Loaves & Fishes, Multnomah County Aging & Disability Services, and PP&R, this program offers daily and weekly activities, as well as van trips and special events. Come check us out!","Completed in 1998, the center's tower, bike racks, fences, and benches were designed by Garth Edwards as a percent-for-art project. The aquatic center was added in 2008 and received LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. In 2009 a stainless steel sculpture by local artist Bruce West was installed near the front entrance. Entitled <i>Sitting Stones</i>, it is a dynamic composition that reflects the changing light of the day and the season.
<p>","5038233450","East Portland Community Center & Pool"
"105","The Vera Katz Eastbank Esplanade is 1.5 miles long, extending north from the Hawthorne Bridge, past the Morrison and Burnside Bridges, to the Steel Bridge with connections to eastside neighborhoods as well as across the river to Gov. Tom McCall Waterfront Park.
 
<b>Features</b>
The historic nature of the Burnside Bridge prohibits any structure from adding any weight to the bridge: the connector that connects the Esplanade to the Burnside Bridge does not lean on the bridge, it merely 'kisses' the bridge. The connector is held in place by pilings sunk into a huge concrete base and the tower structure bears the weight of the stair truss.
 
Designed by Mayer/Reed, landscape architects, there are 13 urban markers at key locations along the Esplanade that mark the eastside city street grid. Mayer/Reed also designed 22 interpretive panels that are attached to the markers. The panels provide information about the river and the rich history of the area - from the building of Portland’s bridges to the development of Portland’s eastside. Each marker also includes unique lighting to illuminate the walkway at night.
 
The Esplanade is a demonstration project for improved habitat areas for fish and wildlife and riverbank restoration. In places, the riverbank has been reshaped with grading that allows for shallow habitat. Bio-engineering techniques use native vegetation and other areas pre-treat I-5 runoff before it enters the river. (All this is a unique feat for a river that seasonally fluctuates 30 feet in water depth.) The plantings also minimize the need for riprap rock for erosion control. 280 trees and 43,695 shrubs were planted along the Esplanade, mostly native plants of Oregon.
 
The construction timeline for the Esplanade, especially work that had to be done in the river, was timed carefully to be sensitive to fish migration seasons. Several large 'root wads' were trucked to the site from Central Oregon and were anchored in place along the riverbank to provide important habitat areas for fish. Wildlife that inhabits this area includes beavers, ducks, geese, herons, steelhead, and salmon.
 
To the north of the Morrison Bridge, the Esplanade provides a lookout over what looks like strange rock formations, but which is actually a large accumulation of concrete. The concrete was dumped in this location by cement trucks washing their truck beds in the river during the building of the Morrison Bridge.
 
Four pieces of public art, created by RIGGA - a group of local artists, are featured between the Morrison Bridge and the floating walkway. The <i>Echo Gate</i>, located beneath the Morrison Bridge, is a sculpture that 'echoes' the pier buildings and Shanghai tunnels of Portland's past. It is made of copper plate that was heat-formed, fitted, and welded. Two pieces of art sit on a concrete wall that is a remnant from the bulkhead of the Port of Portland's Terminal 2 and serves as a reminder of early maritime commerce along Portland’s eastside. The <i>Ghost Ship</i>, sited on the south end of the wall, is a grand lantern made of copperplate, copper bar, a stainless steel substructure, and fit with hundreds of prismatic pieces of art glass. It pays homage to the many ships that have come through Portland, and the ones that have gone down in crossing the Columbia River Bar. The <i>Stackstalk</i> at the north end is a hybrid beacon - part masthead, part wheat stem, part smokestack. Made of rolled steel tubes and a stainless steel basket, it suspends a Japanese glass fishing float in the sky. The final piece, the <i>Alluvial Wall</i>, clings to a concrete retaining wall and echoes the natural shape of the river before Portland was Portland. It alludes to the interwoven layers of the river’s pre-industrial geology and human artifacts; an amalgam of sedimentation and erosion formed of cold-forged steel plate with bronze castings lodged between its layers.
 
At 1,200 feet, the floating walkway is the longest one of its kind in the United States, and offers the sensation of walking on water. The adjoining 120-ft public boat dock provides moorage for recreational boaters as well as space for a future river taxi and other commercial uses.
 
The Steel Bridge RiverWalk, attached about 30 feet above the Willamette River, offers pedestrians and bicyclists a new route across the river and provides visitors on the eastside with a stunning overlook from which to view the downtown cityscape.","","The Eastbank Esplanade has been an important part of the long-term vision for downtown Portland. Early city planners included the park in the 1988 Central City Plan. At the direction of City Council in 1993, work began on developing a master plan to guide the design and construction of the Eastbank Esplanade. The City formed a citizen Eastbank Riverfront Project Advisory Committee (PAC) to provide project oversight to City staff. The PAC included members of adjacent neighborhoods, the Central Eastside Industrial Council, landowners, river and environmental enthusiasts, and long-time parks activists. Hargreaves Associates, landscape architects based in San Francisco, was selected as the lead consultant.
 
Completed in January 1994, the Eastbank Master Plan described an esplanade with docks, piers, overlooks, a plaza for festivals and gatherings, floating walkways, fountains, public art, and connections to the neighborhoods and Portland’s bridges. The Esplanade would connect the east and west sides of the Central City around its central feature – the Willamette River. Construction of the Esplanade began in October 1998 and was completed in May 2001.
 
The Esplanade was named after Mayor Vera Katz in November 2004 to honor her vision and leadership for Portland - which included support for the construction of the esplanade. A bronze sculpture of the mayor by Bill Bane was installed on the plaza at the south end of the esplanade in June 2006.","","Eastbank Esplanade"
"106","<a href="http://www.portlandpublicgolf.com/tee-times.htm" target="_blank">Reserve</a> a tee time online or call 503-775-2900.
 
Visit the Eastmoreland Golf Course website at <a href="http://www.eastmorelandgolfcourse.com" target="_blank">www.eastmorelandgolfcourse.com</a>.","","Eastmoreland is Oregon's second oldest golf course. It came into being originally as a golf course for the use of members of the Multnomah Athletic Club. When one of the members of the Multnomah Club returned from Spokane, where he saw how a golf course was created with help from the municipal Park Commission, an idea had been planted. A committee was organized, with members serving from each of the three local golf courses (Waverly, Portland, and Tualatin). The plan was to rent a 150-acre plot of pasture land that had been leased to the Willsburg Dairy. This agreement was to have lasted for five years. Portland's Mayor Albee approved of the project, and soon the City was purchasing rather than renting. Chandler Egan, a former national amateur golf champion and leading golf course architect, was commissioned to design the course, and in 1917, Portland had its first public golf course.","5037752900","Eastmoreland Golf Course"
"109","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Eastmoreland Playground Park"
"110","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","During the 1990s, the Eastridge Homeowners Association and the Pleasant Valley Neighborhood Association worked with PP&R to complete a master plan for the park. Minor park improvements were made over the years; the construction of the final plan elements was completed in October 2007.","","Eastridge Park"
"112","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","<b>Skate Plaza Stats</b>
18,000 sq ft of street skating with ledges, edges, stairs, rails, and banks. By using recycled and/or sustainable materials in its construction, and with its native landscaping and on-site stormwater treatment, this site is considered to be the first environmentally sensitive skate plaza ever constructed.","The park was named in commemoration of Ed Benedict, a statesman and community activist who was instrumental in getting the park built. In addition to his work as a nurseryman and landscape contractor, he served three terms in the Oregon Legislature, and was a member of many community organizations, including Urban League of Portland, NAACP, and the East County Coordinating Committee.
 
When the proposed Mt Hood freeway project fell through, Benedict worked hard to ensure that the land that had been purchased as an easement for the freeway be developed as a neighborhood park. In 1988 the parcel known as Mt Hood Park was deeded to the City of Portland for "eventual use as a recreational park." Benedict died that year and, in his will, left money to establish a trust fund to develop the park. Ed Benedict Community Park was officially named at a ceremony on July 29, 1991.
 
A granite and basalt sculpture entitled <i>A Contemplative Place</i> by Michihiro Kosuge was installed in 1996 at the west end of the park as a percent-for-art project.","","Ed Benedict Park"
"113","","","The island represents part of an ancient volcano that erupted about 40 million years ago. The large, jagged rocks (Waverly Heights basalt) found throughout the island were formed by lava flows, and may be the oldest exposed rock in the Portland area. The island contains seven distinct habitats, including wetlands, forests and grasslands. A number of birds, including bald eagles and osprey, have been spotted in the area.
 
Elk Rock Island was part of the original donation land claim of Milwaukie pioneer Lot Whitcomb and was known as Lot Whitcomb Island during the 1860s. It went through six owners before Scottish grain exporter and Portland businessman Peter Kerr (1862-1957) acquired the property in 1910 from the Rock Island Club, which operated a dance hall on the island. He gave the island to the City of Portland in 1940 with the requirement that it be preserved in its natural state. As Kerr put it, "Preserve it as a pretty place for all to enjoy." On October 29, 1954, the Kerr formally dedicated Peter Kerr Park with a bronze plaque.","","Elk Rock Island"
"114","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=151128">Click here</a> to view the Errol Heights Master Plan.","","","","Errol Heights Property"
"116","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Essex Park"
"117","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Everett Community Garden"
"118","For more information on the Fanno Creek Greenway Trail Project, go to <a href="http://www.metro-region.org/article.cfm?articleid=1045" target="_blank">www.metro-region.org</a>.","","","","Fanno Creek Natural Area"
"119","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","Farragut Park was named after Admiral David Glasgow Farragut who, although born in Tennessee, fought for the North in the Civil War. He was a hero who is famous for saying, "Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!"","","Farragut Park"
"120","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","According to rumor, the land that is now called Fernhill Park was used as a dumping ground for stolen cars. Auto thieves would steal cars, take them to the ravine, and strip them down for parts. Portland Parks & Recreation 'rode to the rescue' and removed briar patches, graded the hills, and planted grass – turning this one-time valley of vandals into a beautiful park for everyone to enjoy!","","Fernhill Park"
"123","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","Captain George Flavel was a seafaring man who was active in early trade with Portland. Flavel lived in Astoria and was the first pilot licensed to navigate the Columbia River bar.","","Flavel Park"
"124","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Floyd Light Park"
"126","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Forest Heights Park"
"127","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm
 
<a href="http://www.pdxparks.org/maps/natural_areas/forest_park_trail_map_070711.pdf" target="_blank">Topo Trail Map</a> (35 MB)
 
<a href="http://forestparkconservancy.org/portland-hiking-trails/all-trails-challenge.html" target="_blank">2011 All Trails Challenge</a> on March 4 - register now!","Go to the <a href="http://forestparkconservancy.org/portland-hiking-trails/" target="_blank">Forest Park Conservancy</a> for trail information.
 
An abundance of wildlife (more than 112 bird and 62 mammal species) can be found in Forest Park. With its massive tree canopy and substantial undergrowth, the park serves as a natural air purifier, water collector, and erosion controller.
 
The 30-mile Wildwood Trail in Forest Park is part of the region’s 40-Mile Loop system that links Forest Park to pedestrian and trail routes along the Columbia River to Gresham, through southeast Portland, along the Willamette Greenway, and back to the Marquam Trail in southwest Portland. A landmark on the trail is the Stone House. This structure was built in the mid-1930s by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) as a public restroom. The infamous Columbus Day storm on October 12, 1962, took out the water line. Because the structure had been heavily vandalized over the years, the decision was made to gut the building rather than embark on costly repairs. It remains as a favorite spot to rest along the trail.","In 1803, William Clark (of Lewis and Clark fame) paddled far enough up the Willamette River to see Forest Park's present location. He described this forest as having Douglas fir as its predominant tree, with trunks ranging from five to eight feet in diameter.
 
From almost the earliest time of subsequent European settlement along the confluence of the Columbia and Willamette Rivers, the vision of a great natural park along the eastern slope of Portland's northwest hills, which Native Americans called the Tualatin Mountains, was pursued over the years by various civic leaders. The first of these visionaries was the Reverend Thomas Lamb Eliot who arrived in Portland in 1867. His persistence led to the formation of the Municipal Park Commission of Portland in 1899. The Commission brought in the famous landscape architecture firm, Olmsted Brothers of Brookline, Massachusetts, to prepare a park planning study for the City in 1903. Their recommendations included the development of the 40-mile Loop and the acquisition of the wooded hills west of the Willamette River for a park with a wild, woodland character. In their report, they maintained that "...a visit to the woods would afford more pleasure and satisfaction than a visit to any other sort of park..." and "...no use to which this tract of land could be put would begin to be as sensible or as profitable to the city as that of making it a public park."
 
Frederick Van Voorhies Holman, a prominent lawyer in Portland during the 1890s and a president of the Oregon Historical Society, donated a 52-acre parcel to what would become Forest Park. Part of the Holman property had been flushed down to Guild's Lake by Lafe Pence's flume in 1909. After Pence was brought to task, Holman had a plaster of paris scale model made of the property to estimate how much it would cost to return the property to its original contours in order to develop it. Discouraged by the City from taking such a great risk, he offered the property as a park if the property between it and Macleay Park were acquired. The property was donated to the city by his siblings George F. and Mary Holman on August 16, 1939.
 
Various setbacks delayed the formation of the forested park, including rumors of oil existing in the hillside, until the City Club of Portland undertook a feasibility study which it published in 1945. From there the 'Committee of Fifty' civic leaders persevered until 4,200 acres were formally dedicated as Forest Park on September 23, 1948. Additional acres have been added over the years; Forest Park now includes over 5,100 wooded acres making it the largest, forested natural area within city limits in the United States.
<p>","","Forest Park"
"129","","","","","Frank L. Knight Property"
"130","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","This was the former site of the Frazer Detention Home for the Juvenile Court.","","Frazer Park"
"132","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Fulton Community Garden"
"133","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Fulton Park"
"134","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fulton-Park-Community-Center/223881995436?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","Built in 1914, the community center was formerly an elementary school which PP&R obtained through a leasing agreement with Portland Public Schools in 1958.","5038233180","Fulton Park Community Center"
"135","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Gabriel Community Garden & Orchard"
"136","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. Parking lot off SW Canby closed at 10:00pm.
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>","<b>Skatepark Stats</b>
The skatepark is 10,000 sq ft, featuring 8,000 sq ft of snake run and 2,000 sq ft of unique perimeter features including a wall ride, pump bumps, tranny trench, and vert tranny to slappy curb. The snake run includes a 9-ft-deep bowl with concrete coping and tractor seat; the midsection has three hips and a rolled lip design.","In October 1950, the city purchased an 87-acre tract of land featuring two small creeks and wooded areas between Vermont and Canby Streets for $120,000. Part of the park, referred to as Gabriel Acres, gave the park its name.","","Gabriel Park"
"137","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","George G. Gammans was a lawyer in Portland in the early 1900s. When he died in 1910, his wife Laura gave the city six lots to be used for park purposes in order to memorialize him.","","Gammans Park"
"147","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","George Himes was a pioneer Portlander. He was a printer and a historian. He was responsible for printing the early City Directories, which listed all Portland residents by address and occupation. Himes was also the curator and director of the Oregon Historical Society.","","George Himes Park"
"148","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","This park is named for Melvin Clark George, who was a state senator from the Multnomah district (1876-1880) and a U.S. Congressman (1881-1885). He was born in Noble County in Ohio in 1849, moved with his parents over the Old Oregon Trail in 1851, and settled on a homestead near Lebanon, Oregon. He attended Willamette University where he studied law, and started his practice in Portland in 1875. He served as a judge of the State circuit court (1897-1907) and was appointed to superintend the construction of the Burnside Bridge. He also served as a director of the Portland public schools for five years. In 1925, George compiled a travel brochure describing scenes along the Columbia River Highway, <i>The Columbia Highway Booklet</i>. He died in 1933 and was interred in Lone Fir Cemetery.","","George Park"
"149","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Gilbert Heights Park"
"150","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Gilbert Primary Park"
"152","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","This park has been "adopted" by the Glenfair Neighborhood Association. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","","","Glenfair Park"
"153","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Skatepark Stats</b>
The skatepark is 11,000 sq ft, featuring a 5,500-sq-ft street course and 5,500 sq ft of "tranny" (transition) area. The tranny area includes a 9'-deep "peanut bowl" with a 4'-deep shallow end with stairs and a separate rectangular bowl. The street area includes hubba ledges; stamped brick bank; banks, ledges and manual pads; handrails; stairs; two pyramid hips; a quarter pipe; and two "dude chutes."
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","This park has been "adopted" by Mrs. Kabza's Life Skills Class at Roseway Heights School. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","","","Glenhaven Park"
"154","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Glenwood Park"
"156","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","<b>Park Features</b>
 
The Battleship Oregon Memorial was built in 1956 to honor an 1893 ship. It was nicknamed 'the Bulldog of the United States Navy' and fought in many famous battles before it was retired from service. On July 4, 1976, a time capsule was sealed in the base of the memorial. The time capsule is to be opened July 5, 2076.
 
The Founders Stone honors Portland's founders, William Pettygrove and Asa Lovejoy, who tossed a coin to decide whether their new town would be named Boston or Portland.
 
Salmon Street Springs was dedicated in 1988, although it wasn't named until a contest was held in 1989. Designed by Robert Perron Landscape Architects and Planners, the fountain is controlled by an underground computer that changes the pattern of the fountain's 185 water jets. The three cycles of the fountain are called misters, bollards, and wedding cake. At full capacity, the fountain recycles 4,924 gallons of water per minute through as many as 137 jets at once.
 
On August 3, 1990, the Japanese American Historical Plaza was dedicated to the memory of those who were deported to inland internment camps during World War II. In the memorial garden, artwork tells the story of the Japanese people in the Northwest - of immigration, elderly immigrants, native-born Japanese Americans, soldiers who fought in US military services during the war, and the business people who worked hard and had hope for the children of the future. A sculpture by Jim Gion, <i>Songs of Innocence, Songs of Experience</i>, also graces the plaza.
 
A non-profit organization, the Oregon Nikkei Endowment, fueled the commemoration with help from PP&R, Metropolitan Arts Commission, Portland Development Commission, and the Portland-Sapporo Sister City Association. Designed by award-winning landscape architect Robert Murase, the plaza is 70 feet wide at its narrowest, 200 feet at its widest. It extends between NW Davis & Naito Parkway (formerly Front Ave) and the Willamette River esplanade for about 300 feet northward from the Burnside Bridge. One hundred ornamental cherry trees link the plaza northward to the <I>Friendship Circle</I>, by sculptor Lee Kelly and composer Michael Stirling. From a wide concrete circle rise a pair of 20-foot stainless towers from which emanates an eerie electronic melody.
 
In 1993, the Police Memorial, located at SW Jefferson near the Hawthorne Bridge, was dedicated to Portland police officers who had given their lives in the performance of their official duties.","The idea for this park came at the turn of the century when the 1903 Olmsted Report pointed out the need not only for parks within the city, but for a greenway scheme for the riverbanks in order to ensure their preservation for future generations. The 1912 Bennett Plan again showed a need for more parks and river greenways, but instead of reorienting itself to the river, the city's focus was pulled further inland.
In the late 1920s, the seawall was built along the Willamette's west bank for the protection of downtown from the annual floods. The seawall not only cut off the water from the people, but the people from the water as well. The construction of Harbor Drive along the west bank in the 1940s continued the trend of isolating the public from the river.
 
With the opening of the Eastbank Freeway (Marquam Bridge, I-5), Harbor Drive became less important to the traffic flow of the city. Governor Tom McCall created the Harbor Drive Task Force in 1968 in order to study proposals for creating a public open space in its place. In 1974, Harbor Drive was torn up and construction of a waterfront park began. It was completed and dedicated in 1978, gaining instant popularity. In 1984, the park was renamed Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park.","","Waterfront Park"
"166","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","This park was dedicated while Sylvester Pennoyer was Governor of Oregon (1894-1901), giving the park its name. Pennoyer was the first person to make a gift of property to the City of Portland for solely park purposes.","","Governor's Park"
"167","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525.
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","The park is named after Ulysses S. Grant who visited Portland three times, a rare thing for a president to do in the days before air travel - or even before standardized rail travel! Grant was first assigned to Fort Vancouver where he made friends with many of Portland's politicians.
 
Grant Park was the setting for many scenes in children's books by Beverly Cleary. In 1991, a group of teachers, librarians, and business people formed the Friends of Henry & Ramona, and began to raise funds for the <i>Beverly Cleary Sculpture Garden for Children</i>. Portland artist Lee Hunt created life-sized bronze statues of three of Cleary's best-loved characters - Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Henry's dog Ribsy. Fountains were installed under Ramona's and Ribsy's feet for kids to splash in during warm weather. Scattered around the concrete fountain slab are granite plaques engraved with the titles of the Cleary books that take place in Portland - and a map of the neighborhood showing where events in the books "really happened." The Sculpture Garden was dedicated on October 13, 1995. <a href="http://www.multcolib.org/kids/cleary/">Click here</a> for more information.","","Grant Park"
"170","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Hamilton Park"
"171","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","This park has been "adopted" by the Hancock Madison Group Watch. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","","","Hancock Park"
"172","","","","","Harbor View Property"
"173","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","General William S. Harney was the commander of the U.S. Army's Department of Oregon from 1858-59. Harney was instrumental in making San Juan Island, off Washington's coast, part of the United States rather than part of Canada.
 
The park that bears Harney's name was originally a neighborhood eyesore; it was the location of illegal dumping and was a magnet for 4-wheelers out for a spin. When the neighbors decided that something needed to be done, they applied for a Housing and Community Development grant from Multnomah County. The neighbors received a $50,000 grant and the assurance that the Marines would volunteer to grade the park. Due to the passage of the 1989 Park Improvement Levy, PP&R matched the Multnomah County funds. The community was able to drum up enough extra money to complete the project by gaining the support of the Portland Trail Blazers, the Rose Festival Association, and Precision Castparts, one of the major employers of the neighborhood's working population.
 
The renovations to Harney Park became a reality in 1991. About the collaborative effort that went into the project, Nick Sauvie of the Southeast Neighborhood Uplift Program said, "People need to work together. The government can't do it alone . . . here's an instance where Portland residents made a $50,000 investment and they got a park worth $200,000. For people who are really turned off by government's ineffectiveness, that's a very tangible return."","","Harney Park"
"175","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Harrison Park"
"178","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Healy Heights Park"
"179","","","In 1988, when the proposed development of rowhouses on this site meant the cutting down of the historic Corbett Oak, hundreds of community members came to the rescue! Through political and public pressure, the tree was spared. Nearly 10 years later, another development scheme threatened the venerable oak, and the Friends of the Oak rallied once again to save the tree. They raised funds to buy the tree and its lot, and worked with the Parks Bureau to add it to the City's public park inventory as Heritage Tree Park.","","Heritage Tree Park"
"180","<a href="http://www.portlandpublicgolf.com/tee-times.htm" target="_blank">Reserve</a> a tee time online or call 503-289-1818.
 
Visit the Heron Lakes Golf Course website at <a href="http://www.heronlakesgolf.com" target="_blank">www.heronlakesgolf.com</a>.","Designed by renowned golf architects Robert Trent Jones, Sr. and his son Robert Trent Jones II, Heron Lakes offers two distinct and challenging golf courses designed to meet every skill level: the Greenback opened in 1971 and the Great Blue opened in 1992. Listed by Golf Digest as one of the top 75 public courses in the U.S., Heron Lakes has been host to the Sentry Guisti, the annual Portland Invitational Tournament, and the 2000 USGA Amateur Public Links Championship.","Nestled between the Willamette River and the Columbia Slough, this property is a natural flood plain. For centuries the seasonal rise and fall of the water made it a rich plant and animal habitat and an important Indian gathering place. In the early 1900s levees were constructed for drainage which allowed for industrial development in the area. Between 1942 and 1948 it was the site of Vanport, the second largest and most short-lived city in Oregon. Built during World War II to house shipyard workers, it was destroyed in the devasting flood of 1948.","5032891818","Heron Lakes Golf Course"
"183","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Hillsdale Park"
"184","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hillside-Community-Center/117362368308266?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","Designed in the 1940s by noted local architect Pietro Belluschi, the community center originated as the Catlin Gabel School. After the school moved, the Portland Art Association purchased the property for use as an artists' cooperative. Finding the property too costly to maintain, the Art Association decided to sell it, and word spread that the most likely buyer was a developer of condominiums. Since many of the homes in the area are situated on steep lots with no backyards, residents felt that the site would be better used as a park and community center. The problem, of course, was money. The community was given a year to raise $106,500 to purchase the land and the buildings on it. After an exhaustive neighborhood fundraising effort, plus contributions from the City Council and private foundations, the community was still $25,000 short.
 
To make up the difference, twelve families, sometimes referred to as the 'Trembling Twelve,' took out second mortgages on their homes to guarantee the loan that finalized the purchase. In spring of 1974, the neighbors turned the property over to the City of Portland, which accepted it as a public park and agreed to maintain it and staff a community center there.
 
To create more open space, PP&R razed all the buildings except the old gymnasium, and constructed tennis courts, a soccer field, and play areas. The gym itself was remodeled, with care taken to preserve the building's exterior beauty.","5038233181","Hillside Community Center"
"185","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. Parking lot closed at 8:30pm, Mon-Thu, and at 6:00pm, Fri for the weekend. Gate is reopened Mon morning.
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","5038235197","Hillside Park"
"186","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","This park is named after Benjamin Holladay (1819-1887), known to many as "a sharpster, a con man, and a rake." He stirred things up wherever he went and was a bit of a dandy, dressing like a riverboat gambler. He was said to be "wholly destitute of fixed principles of honesty, morality, or common decency." In 1868 Holladay sold his stage coach business in California to Wells Fargo and moved to Portland to get involved in the railroad business. His goal was to build a rail line to California along the east side of the Willamette River. In order to do so, he spent a total of $55,000 in bribe money to help secure his company's endorsement. He also built two large hotels in the area where the park bearing his name is now located. Known as an extravagant spender, Holladay owned numerous mansions on both coasts and had over extended himself financially. He lost his railroad in 1876, and died in Portland in 1887.
 
Commissioned by the Lloyd Corporation and Pacific Power & Light in 1964, a concrete fountain featuring music and lights was installed in the park. Designed by Jack Stuhl, assisted by Ted Widing and Phillips Electrical, the musical fountain was favorite gathering place for park visitors. It was replaced in 2000, in conjunction with a major renovation of the park, by a spouting fountain designed by Tim Clemen and Murase Associates.
 
Three cast-bronze sculptures by artist Tad Savinar were added to the park as a percent-for-art project in 2000. Entitled <i>Constellation</i>, the project illustrates the connection between the personal front yard garden and the civic park garden through three distinct elements: a vase of cut flowers, an abstract molecule containing elements of a good neighborhood, and the figure of a home gardener, shears in hand. The objects in the molecule were selected by the Sullivan Gulch Neighborhood Association and the gardener was modeled after Carolyn Marks, a longtime neighborhood activist.","","Holladay Park"
"189","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm. The parking lot and access roads are closed at 10:00pm.
 
To reserve a picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
Go to <a href="http://www.hoytarboretum.org" target="_blank">www.hoytarboretum.org</a> for self-guided tours and other visitor information.","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/HoytArboretum#!/HoytArboretum?v=wall" target="_blank">Find Us on Facebook</a>","During National Forestry Week in 1928, the Forestry Committee of the Chamber of Commerce convinced the City Council to establish an arboretum in Washington Park to preserve evergreens for educational and recreational purposes. Multnomah County gave the Parks Bureau perpetual use of approximately 145 acres of land north of Washington Park for this purpose. It was named Hoyt Arboretum in honor of Ralph Warren Hoyt, the county commissioner who championed the formation of the arboretum.
 
Most of the collection is arranged in family groups: all the oaks are in one area and all of the redwoods are in another. Grouping by scientific classification, or taxonomic arrangement, was in vogue when the Arboretum was first laid out. In the 1930s, planners decided to use Fairview Boulevard to divide the conifers from the deciduous trees: conifers were planted on the west side and deciduous trees on the east.
 
Although Hoyt Arboretum is relatively young, it possesses the largest group of distinct species of any arboretum in the U.S. Its plant collection contains 10,000 individual trees and shrubs, representing nearly 1,000 different species from around the world.","5038658733","Hoyt Arboretum"
"191","IFCC is managed by Ethos Music Center. Visit their <a href="http://ethos.org/programs/ifcc/" target="_blank">website</a> for class and rental information.","","The building is an historic firehouse that was in use 1911-1959.","5032838467","Interstate Firehouse Cultural Center"
"194","Park hours: 5:00am-9:00pm","","Even before remodeling of the Civic Auditorium began in the early 1960s, plans to create an open space across the street were being proposed. The proposal submitted by Lawrence Halprin, the well-known San Franciscan architect who had designed the Lovejoy Fountain a few years earlier, was unanimously approved in 1968. Designed by Angela Danadjieva, the Forecourt Fountain was completed in 1970. 13,000 gallons of water per minute cascade through its terraces and platforms, suggesting the Northwest's abundant waterfalls. The concrete fountain became an instant city landmark and an internationally acclaimed open space.
 
In 1978, the fountain was renamed after Ira C. Keller (1899-1978), civic leader and first chairman of the Portland Development Commission (1958-72). Keller pushed through the renewal plan for the South Auditorium area of downtown which included the construction of the Forecourt Fountain. It has been said that "it was Keller's enormous energy that made urban renewal work in Portland."","","Keller Fountain Park"
"195","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
Tennis court lights are turned off at 9:30 PM, October 1-May 31, and at 10:00 PM, June 1-September 30.","","The land in the Irvington neighborhood was originally owned by Captain William Irving, who was famous in early Pacific Northwest maritime history. Part of the land occupied by Irving Park was the site of the Irvington Racetrack, one of four defunct racetracks now sporting Portland parks.","","Irving Park"
"197","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Ivon Community Garden"
"200","Go to <a href="http://www.japanesegarden.com" target="_blank">www.japanesegarden.com</a> for visitor information.","","","5032231321","Japanese Garden"
"201","","","","","Jensen Natural Area"
"202","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","John Luby Park"
"203","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Johns Community Garden"
"205","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The Johnson Creek Watershed area was once the home of the Clackamas Indians, a subgroup of the Chinookan speakers who lived in the Columbia River Valley from Celilo Falls to the Pacific Ocean. When Lewis and Clark visited the area in 1806, the Clackamas tribe consisted of about 1,800 people living in 11 villages. Epidemics of smallpox, malaria, and measles reduced this population to 88 by 1851, and in 1855 the tribe signed a treaty surrendering its lands, including Johnson Creek.
 
By the middle of the 19th century, European American settlers had begun to remove vegetation, build sawmills, fell trees, fill wetlands, and farm along Johnson Creek. The creek is named for one of these newcomers, William Johnson, who in 1846 settled in what later became the Lents neighborhood and operated a water-powered sawmill. In early 1848 Lot Whitcomb, who would later found Milwaukie, filed a donation land claim and built a sawmill near the confluence of Johnson Creek and the Willamette River. In 1886, plans were made for train tracks along the creek. In 1903, the Springwater Division Line, also known as the Portland Traction Company Line, the Cazadero Line, and the Bellrose Line, was built along Johnson Creek to provide rail transport for passengers and freight. Sellwood, Eastmoreland, Lents, and Pleasant Valley were among the new communities that grew up along the line. By the 1920s, housing began to replace creekside farms, a trend that has continued.
<p>","","Johnson Creek Park"
"207","","","Harry Johnson purchased the lake in 1911. Over a half a century ago this lake was the recreational center of the area. The lake, which is fed with 20 springs, was so clear that you could see the bottom of the lake. The springs in the shallow areas were so strong that the water resembled bubbling fountains. People rented boats to play, fish, and swim on the clear waters. There was a beach house where they could change, a dance hall where they could recreate. In the late 1940s the dance hall burned down, but the community still enjoyed the lake for a number of years.
 
With the Vanport Flood in 1948, the lake was flooded by the slough and became murky. In the 1950s, Owens-Illinois (glass factory) purchased the land to the south and west of the lake and the area where the lake flows into the slough system from Mr. Johnson. The following year, a mysterious 'sludge' began appearing on the lake (Owens-Illinois was eventually fined for this). This began what seemed to be a lifelong issue between Harry Johnson and Owens-Illinois. In the 1960s, Mr. Johnson constructed a logjam around the outflow pipes where Owens-Illinois dumped into the lake in an attempt to try to keep the oil and surface pollutants from spreading across the surface of the lake. At that time the neighborhood kids were still swimming and fishing on this lake.
 
When I-205 was constructed in the late 1960s–early 1970s, a portion of the lake and a small stream that flowed into it were filled in. Over the next two decades, fishermen continued to spend time on the lake until they noticed that the fish they were catching had sores on them. In 1996 the City of Portland purchased Harry Johnson's half of the lake from his daughter, Dorothy Thoreson, and it became an environmentally protected area. In 1997, a number of people got together and planted 1,000 trees on the property. A class of students from Madison High School did a study on the history of the lake and did testing on the water quality. Volunteers continue to try to keep the blackberry vines under control.
 
PP&R, Bureau of Environmental Services, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, and the Columbia Slough Watershed Council are involved in trying to recover the lake and the surrounding habitat. A consortium of these agencies and the neighborhood associations for Parkrose, Sumner, and Cully are committed to this effort.
 
<I>(Information provided by Marcy Emerson-Peters)</I>","","Johnson Lake Property"
"209","Park hours: 6:00am-9:00pm
 
To reserve a picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>","","New Englander Hall Jackson Kelley (1790-1874) was one of the most vocal advocates for Oregon in the first half of the 19th century. In 1828 he published <I>Settlement on the Oregon River</I>, and nine more pamphlets on a similar theme over the next 40 years. A bit deranged, he spent most of his life bitterly trying to win notice - and payment - for having sparked American interest in the Pacific Northwest.
 
Kelley visited Oregon briefly in 1834. During that time, Sellwood, Milwaukie, and Oregon City were all vying with Portland to be the main city at the north end of the Willamette. Among these was Kelley's unsuccessful attempt to establish a city at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers. In 1926 this site was named Kelley Point.
 
Kelley Point Park was originally owned by the Port of Portland which covered the flood-prone peninsula with tons of river dredgings. The site that was once envisioned as a city is now a park on an isolated tip of land.","","Kelley Point Park"
"210","","","This site is named after pioneer Clinton Kelly, who settled this donation land claim east of the Willamette river in 1848.","","Kelly Butte Natural Area"
"213","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","The land occupied by Kenilworth Park and most of the Kenilworth neighborhood was part of the land claim owned by Clinton Kelly, a Methodist minister from Kentucky who settled in the area in 1848. In 1909 the Portland Park Board purchased 9 acres from Kelly with funds from a 1908 bond measure created specifically to acquire land for parks in Portland.
 
The park and the neighborhood, platted in 1889, are named after Sir Walter Scott's 1821 novel <I>Kenilworth</I>, a romantic novel set in Elizabethan England. Many of the streets in the neighborhood took their names from this novel and other novels by Scott.
 
In 1910, Park Superintendent Emanuel Mische created a design for the park that was inspired by the park's natural topography and vegetation. The design included a bandstand, tennis courts, sports field, wading pool and play area, sand courts, walkways, and vista points. In 1912 a comfort station pavilion was added and remains an important historic feature of the park. Designed by Ellis Lawrence in the 20th Century Classic style, it is significant for its cubist form and decorative brickwork arches. Originally the arches were open and provided unobstructed views of the city; in 1983, in order to curb vandalism, metal doors were added to close off the pavilion when not in use. Today, the basic layout of the park remains intact and is indicative of the strength and appeal of Mische's original design.","","Kenilworth Park"
"214","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Kennedy Community Garden"
"215","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Kenton Park"
"216","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","According to Eugene E. Snyder's Portland Names and Neighborhoods, this park was named for the Kern Park real estate subdivision plat, laid out in 1903 by the Sycamore Real Estate Company.","","Kern Park"
"217","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","Both the school and the park are named in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.","","King School Park"
"218","","","This property was donated to the city by Mr. and Mrs. Kingsley D. Bundy and their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Van Raden. Bundy, a mailman of 41 years, had dreamed of one day giving the land so that others could enjoy this forest along Johnson Creek.","","Kingsley D. Bundy Property"
"219","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Kingsley Park is named after Edward D. and Charlotte W. Kingsley, who donated the park and its playground to the children of the Linnton area "in consideration of civic pride and the general public good and welfare." Kingsley was a pioneer lumberman who first passed through Portland in 1898 on his way to the Klondike. He returned to his home in Freeport, Illinois, gathered up his wife and children, and traveled to Oregon, this time for good. In 1905 he founded the West Oregon Lumber Company in Linnton.
<p>","","Kingsley Park"
"220","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. Parking lot closed at 10:00pm.
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","A. J. Knott owned land in the area of the street and park that now bear his name. In the 1880s and 1890s, Knott operated the Stark St. Ferry, which connected Portland and East Portland for many years. The ferry was originally fueled by "mule-power," with mules pulling the ferry from each shore. Business dwindled when the Morrison Bridge was made free to all, since the Stark Street Ferry was only free to small children and funeral parties.","","Knott Park"
"221","Visit the Friends of Ladd's Addition Gardens (FLAG) website at <a href="http://www.laddsadditiongardens.org" target="_blank">www.laddsadditiongardens.org</a> for volunteer opportunities and maps of the rose gardens.","","Born in Vermont, William Sargent Ladd (1826-1893) came West during the California Gold Rush and settled in Portland in 1851. He prospered as a merchant, established the Ladd and Tilton Bank, and invested in real estate, mainly on the east side of the Willamette River. He was elected mayor in 1854 and was prominent in every aspect of Portland business activity. In 1891 he decided to subdivide his 126-acre farm on Portland's east side. Inspired by Pierre L'Enfant's plan for Washington, D.C., Ladd designed the plat based on a diagonal street system surrounding a central park. Also included were four diamond-shaped rose gardens located on the points of a compass. Ladd's Addition was considerd a radical departure from the common grid pattern of the expanding city.
 
In 1909, Park Superintendent Emanuel Mische designed a formal landscape plan for the gardens in Ladd's Addition. He planted camellias, perennials, and a lawn area in the central circle and numerous rose varieties in the four diamonds, creating a stunning stained glass effect. Today the gardens feature over 3,000 roses of sixty varieties that were popular in the early 20th century.
 
This property came under PP&R's care in 1981.","","Ladd Circle Park & Rose Gardens"
"222","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","This park was given to the city by Multnomah County in 1927. The surrounding neighborhhod and the park were named after William Lair Hill (1838-1924), a pioneer attorney, historian, and newspaper editor who briefly owned the property in that area. Hill was responsible for codifying Oregon laws between 1882 and 1887.
 
Two buildings of historical interest are located in the park. The main building was constructed out of brick in 1918 in the Modified Georgian Revival style, with prominent brick quoining, gently arched windows with stone keystones, and dentils at the eave - and served as a dormitory for nurses working at the county hospital. In 1942, the State Architect's Office extensively remodeled it to serve as the Youth Administration of the Federal Security Agency. In 1949, the Park Bureau created a Junior Museum in the building, later renamed the Children's Museum, until it was relocated to the former OMSI building in Washington Park in 2001.
 
The smaller building, the Customs House, was built in 1921 as a branch of the county library. The building, Italian Renaissance Revival, is one of seven Carnegie-funded branch libraries in Portland. It was designed by Folger Johnson, of Johnson & Wallwork, who designed four of the seven Portland Carnegie branches. The prominent arched windows and the curved entrance flanked by columns are typical of Italian Renaissance style. On the interior, a broken pediment appears below the circular window and Corinthian columns flank the wings. The library housed a collection of books in Yiddish, German, Polish, and Italian, as well as English before being converted to an art center by the Park Bureau in the early 1950s. Today the building is used as office space for PP&R staff.
 
At the west end of the park, a sculpture of metal boulders by local artist Bruce West represents a rock grotto which once stood in the park and provided a shady place where older men gathered on hot summer days to play chess. It was installed in 1978 and is entitled simply <i>BW1</i>.
<p>","","Lair Hill Park"
"224","Park hours: 5:00am-10:30pm
 
To reserve a picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","The off-leash area in this park has been "adopted" by the Friends of Laurelhurst OLA. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","In 1909, the land that is now Laurelhurst Park was purchased from the estate of William S. Ladd, who developed Ladd's Addition and twice was mayor of Portland. Ladd named his 486-acre parcel Hazel Fern Farm, after the name of one of the streets in the area. Here Ladd developed one of the most prestigious stock farms in the West. In fact, his purebred Jersey cattle probably laid the foundation for Oregon's future livestock industry. As East Portland developed, Ladd's tract of land became too valuable for agricultural use. Ladd sold his land for over $1,000,000 to the Laurelhurst Company around the turn of the century.
 
A spring-fed pond on the property had always been a favorite watering hole for cattle, as well as a favorite swimming hole for both children and adults. In 1911, seeing the potential for a park as part of the Olmsted Plan, the City of Portland bought 30 of the acres, including the pond.
 
In 1912, Emanuel Mische, Portland's park superintendent from 1908-1914, designed the park based on his experience as the longtime horticultural expert for the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm. Inspired by the Olmstedian 'natural' landscaping approach, his plan included several distinct sections - the concert grove, Firwood Lake, children's lawn, plateau and broad meadows, picnic grove, and Rhododendron Hill. Workers were hired to deepen the pond into a 3-acre lake. A 'play park' was developed between Oak and Stark Streets. The boys were to play on the south side, the girls on the north side, and general games were to be held in the eastern block. The park's comfort station building was added in 1914 and a series of paths and sidewalks were lit by electric lights in 1915.
 
Laurelhurst Park is a perfect example of the City Beautiful Movement in landscaping. In 1919, the park was named the most beautiful park on the west coast by the Pacific Coast Parks Association. Thanks to the efforts of the Portland Historical Landmarks Commission, in February 2001 Laurelhurst Park was named to the National Register of Historic Places, the first city park ever listed on the national register.
 
For years, the Rose Festival Queen's Coronation took place in the Laurelhurst Park pond on floating boats and decorated rafts. The event drew thousands of onlookers who were attracted to the music, dancing, and pageantry. In the 1950s, Easter Sunrise Services were held, drawing thousands of people.
 
In the park's early years, the pond was patrolled by a white swan named General Pershing (for his militant attitude). He forbade anyone to approach the edge of the lakeshore. In later years a black-beaked, black-toed swan named Big Boy was lake marshall. A man, known only as Mr. Martinson, fed Big Boy every day for 15 years. Mr. Martinson taught Big Boy to nod his head and honk "Hello!"
 
Laurelhurst Park's ideal duck population is ten male/female pairs. In 1987, the normal duck population was at 120, with seasonal visitors sometimes boosting numbers over 200. PP&R wanted to reduce the duck population in order to clear up the murkiness from the lake water. An adopt-a-duck venture was unsuccessful because the company hired to catch the birds was unable to trick the birds into their traps.
 
In 1990, nearly 20,000 catfish, carp, and black crappie fish were stirring up sediment on the lake's bottom. In addition, the water was smelly because of the overcrowding. The Oregon Bass and Panfish Club tried to deplete the fish population to no avail. Today, thousands of fish still inhabit the lake, along with the ducks and turtles.","","Laurelhurst Park"
"225","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Laurelwood Park"
"226","The mission of Leach Botanical Garden is to maintain and enhance living collections of plants for the purpose of education, research, and conservation and to preserve the legacy of the Garden’s founders, John and Lilla Leach. The Garden is committed to providing positive experiences to the diverse community upon which it relies for support.","Visit the Leach Garden website at <a href="http://www.leachgarden.org" target="_blank">www.leachgarden.org</a>
 
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/LeachBotanicalGarden?sk=wall" target="_blank">Find Us on Facebook</a>","The property was originally part of a 320-acre donation land claim belonging to Jacob Johnson, one of the sawmill operators who was furnishing lumber for the very early homes in Portland. Johnson's land extended from Mt. Scott down across the creek that was later named for him.
 
In 1931, John and Lilla Leach purchased part of what had been Johnson's property and named it Sleepy Hollow. John, a pharmacist, and Lilla, an accomplished botanist, devoted their land to their fascination with plants. Lilla discovered five plant species new to science. One of these species dates back 10 million years ago; it was given the Latinized form of its discoverer's name, <I>Kalmiopsis leachiana</I>. John Leach was also a talented craftsman and very proficient at metalwork (some of his work is on display at the Garden). He was active in the Oregon Arts & Crafts Society and served as president.","5038239503","Leach Botanical Garden"
"231","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Lents Community Garden"
"234","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","Lents Park is named after Oliver Perry Lent, a stonemason who came to Oregon in the 1850s to farm a 190-acre land claim. The area became the center of a growing farm community. George P. Lent, the eldest son of Oliver Lent, platted the town of Lents in 1892. In 1912, the Lents community was annexed from Multnomah County and incorporated into the City of Portland.
 
According to neighborhood reports, the original 5.2 acres of Lents Park had previously been used as a gravel quarry. During the 1940s and 1950s, an additional 32 acres was purchased from private property owners by the City of Portland in an effort to assemble all of the land between SE 88 & 92 and SE Holgate & Steele for park purposes. In 1953, a central plan was prepared by the City, proposing locations for a baseball stadium, athletic playing fields, tennis courts, community buildings, pathways, and parking areas. Construction on the stadium began in 1956.
 
The stadium was named after Charles B. Walker. From 1930-1934, he supervised playground softball teams as a playground leader and in 1934, organized the first industrial and commercial softball leagues. In 1935, he was appointed as the city's first Sports Director. From 1944-45, Walker served as an American Red Cross Field Director in Germany. Upon his return from the war, he helped organize the first men's and women's softball tourneys ever held west of the Mississippi. In 1950, he was appointed as the commissioner of the Amateur Softball Association (ASA) for the Portland Metro area. He also served as the Pacific Coast Vice-President of the ASA. He retired from the Parks Bureau in 1969 after 40 years of dedication and service to the game of softball.","","Lents Park"
"236","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Lesser Park"
"238","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","Until 1947, this was known as Albina Park, since it is in what was once the City of Albina. In 1941, some residents requested that the park be renamed Mike Lillis Park. Michael Edward Lillis was a police officer on the Albina Park beat who was well-liked in that neighborhood. He had been a strong advocate for the park and the children in that area. Other neighbors felt that the park should keep its original name. In 1947, there was a compromise and since then the park has been named Lillis-Albina Park.","","Lillis-Albina Park"
"239","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Lincoln Park"
"240","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","This acreage was originally owned by the estate of Aaron Meier, one of the two founders of the Meier and Frank Company. The local Boy Scouts were allowed to use the property and the cabin on it and the timber rights were sold to a logging company. Aaron's son, Oregon Governor Julius Meier, had been approached about donating the property for a park, but the estate declined until 1938 when it made a gift deed to the City on November 8. The Boy Scouts and other groups worked to reforest the property and contiguous property. The Linnton schoolhouse is located in the southeast corner of the park.
 
The park was named for Lewis F. Linn, the U.S. Senator from Missouri from 1834 until his death in 1843, who was the author and advocate of the Donation Land Act which gave free land to settlers in the Oregon Territory. His efforts carried the bill through the Senate and he was hailed as the "Father of Oregon."","","Linnton Park"
"241","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The park was named after Portland’s largest amusement park called Lotus Isle, the <i>Million-Dollar Pleasure Paradise</i>. Lotus Isle spread out over 128 acres east of Jantzen Beach and it officially opened June 28, 1930. It was known as the Wonderland of the Pacific Northwest and you could take in over 40 rides at the amusement park. The park’s name was derived from the Lotus Water Lily, which was associated with euphoria and enlightenment in Oriental and Egyptian mythology.
 
The short-lived amusement park was plagued by debt, alleged gangland connections, and a plane crash which destroyed several buildings. It closed after the 1932 season and a bonfire was set to virtually destroy all memory of the park.
 
Today, much of this land has been developed, including moorages, houseboats, marinas, and condos. From the park, you can still see the pilings from the 700-foot trestle that once carried the streetcars that went on to Hayden Island and then to Vancouver, Washington.","","Lotus Isle Park"
"242","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","This park is named for Asa Lawrence Lovejoy, one of the first owners of the Portland townsite. He and Francis W. Pettygrove took part in the famous coin flip which decided whether the name of the new frontier town would be Portland or Boston. Pettygrove, from Portland, Maine won. Lovejoy was the director of Oregon's first telegraph company and was an active participant in railroad development in the Willamette Valley.
 
Lovejoy Fountain Park, along with Pettygrove Park, is in what was known in the 1960s as the 'urban renewal area.' The same coin that Mr. Lovejoy and Mr. Pettygrove used to determined whether our city would be called Portland or Boston was flipped to determine which park would be Lovejoy and which would be Pettygrove.
 
The Lovejoy Fountain was designed by Lawrence Halprin, the well-known San Franciscan architect. The concrete fountain was installed in 1966. "The fountain wonderfully captures the spirit of Oregon's streams. Pouring in a sheet over the lip of the upper pool, the water is whipped into a foaming cascade as it splashes down over an irregular series of stairsteps and then out again into a placid lower basin." (The Oregonian, 7/28/66)
<p>","","Lovejoy Fountain Park"
"243","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Lownsdale is one of two courthouse squares that comprise the Plaza Blocks which are bounded by Third and Fourth Avenues and Salmon and Madison Streets. The north square is named for Kentuckian Daniel H. Lownsdale, who settled in Portland in 1845 when there were fewer than 800 people living in the city. The south square is named for former Iowa territorial legislator and native Virginian William Williams Chapman (1808-1892) who arrived in Portland in 1850.
 
The Plaza Blocks were lively places where orators held forth and citizens assembled. They are characterized in part by several large old elms and gingko trees. Chapman Square, originally designed for the exclusive use of women and children, features all female gingko trees. Lownsdale Square was to be the "gentlemen's gathering place." Today the Plaza Blocks are still a busy gathering place, although men and women can now safely coexist in either of them.
 
In the center of Lownsdale Square stands the <I>Soldiers' Monument</I>, Douglas Tilden’s monument to the Oregonians killed in the Spanish-American War. Dedicated on May 31, 1906, the tall granite obelisk is topped with a bronze replica of an infantryman of the Second Oregon U.S. Volunteer Infantry, part of the first large American fighting force ever sent overseas. At the base of this monument are two small cannons from Fort Sumter (misspelled on the plaque) brought here by Colonel Henry E. Dosch. Because the cannons were used by both Union and Confederate troops, it was Dosch's idea to face one north and one south.
 
Another war memorial, dedicated to the men killed in service in the Philippines, is found in Lownsdale Square. <i>Fountain for Company H</i>, installed in 1914, was donated by the mothers, sisters, and wives of Company H of the Second Oregon Volunteers. John H. Beaver, an architectural draftsman, won the honor of designing the limestone fountain and a $50 prize in a citywide contest.
 
Between the two Plaza Blocks, Main Street curves around a huge elk fountain given to the city by David P. Thompson. Thompson arrived in Portland driving sheep over the Oregon Trail. He served as Portland's mayor from 1879-1882. One day looked out of the office window in his New Market Building at the Skidmore Fountain and decided that he wanted to dedicate a fountain to the city as well. Thompson commissioned Roland Hinton Perry, whose work adorns the Library of Congress and the dome of the Pennsylvania state capitol, and in 1900, he presented the city with a bronze elk fountain to commemorate elk that once grazed nearby. Local architect H.G. Wright designed the stone base of eastern granite, which included drinking troughs for horses and dogs. The Exalted Order of Elks refused to dedicate it because they considered the statue "a monstrosity of art." Many have tried to have Thompson's elk removed because it can be considered a traffic obstacle, but the elk statue remains. In 1974, after a debate about disturbing the blocks in order to complement the then-new General Services Building, Thompson's elk and the Plaza Blocks were designated as Historic Landmarks.","","Lownsdale Square"
"244","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Lynchview Park"
"245","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Lynchwood Park"
"246","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm
 
Part of Forest Park","","Danford Balch was the original owner and settler of this area. He arrived in Oregon in 1847 and settled his donation land claim in 1850, carving out a space in the forest for a large cabin for himself, his wife, and their nine children. A nearby claim was taken by the Stump family. The two families did not care for each other. In true Shakespearean fashion, Mortimer Stump, the eldest son of the clan, began courting Anna, the oldest of the Balch daughters. Danford, a peaceful man, warned Mortimer to stay away from his fifteen-year-old daughter, but Mortimer paid no heed. When Anna turned sixteen, she and Mortimer ran away to Vancouver, Washington, where they eloped. Two weeks later, Danford took his shotgun and met members of the Stump family, including his new son-in-law, at the Stark Street Ferry. As the ferry was loading, Danford shot both barrels into Mortimer, who died instantly. Danford claimed the shooting was an accident, but was taken to jail, where he waited until the next spring to be tried. The jail being flimsy, he was able to break out. He hid out in the west hills near his farm until July, when he was re-arrested. In August, he was tried and convicted of the murder. On October 17, 1859 he was hanged at a public gallows in front of over 500 witnesses. The creek that runs through the property bears his name because for years after his hanging people still referred to the area as the Old Balch Place.
 
In 1862, the claim was sold for $5,000 to John Confer, whom Danford's widow soon married. He then sold the property to John H. Mitchell, the attorney (and later US Senator) who was handling the Balch affairs, for $550. Mitchell also bought the children's claim in the land for $5,500. Two weeks later he sold it to the mayor of Portland for $15,000.
 
The property was eventually acquired by Donald Macleay, a prominent Portland merchant. Macleay was an early real estate developer and an investor in railroads. He was president of the Portland Board of Trade in the 1880s. Macleay, a Scotsman, gave the land to the city in 1897 in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of Queen Victoria's reign, but that was not the only reason! It is said that Macleay complained that his taxes on the property were too high and that he would rather give his land to the city for park purposes than pay so much in taxes. The Deputy Assessor, L. S. Maxwell, countered with, "Well, then, why don't you?" Macleay returned to the courthouse three days later with a deed turning the steep, rough gulch of tall timbers into Macleay Park. This was the first true gift of land for parks except for a small portion of Governors Park. One of the provisions of the gift was that "the city shall provide conveyance for carrying patients from the [area] hospitals through the park during the summer." The paths were also widened in order to accommodate wheelchairs. This was done so that hospital-bound people would have the opportunity to enjoy the beautiful outdoors, especially in the heat of summer.
 
In 1905, Lafe Pence from Denver decided to use a mining device called a flume to wash hillsides along Balch Gulch into Guild's Lake to create fill areas for industrial sites. He caused a great ruckus because he ignored getting permission from the legal landowners, but he partially succeeded in his scheme. A portion of the flume was used as a walkway for many years until it was replaced by a trail.
<p>","","Macleay Park"
"247","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The park is named after the madrone tree located on the east edge of the park at N. Wygant. It has been designated as a <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=40280">Heritage Tree</a>.","","Madrona Park"
"248","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Formerly a parking lot, Mallory Meadows is one of three parks in the King neighborhood financed in large part by a grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund. Completed in 2002, neighborhood volunteers built it with grants, donations, and hard labor. One of the park's elements is a low, undulating wall faced with glazed tiles containing self-portraits of elementary school children from the neighborhood.","","Mallory Meadows Park"
"249","In fall 2010, 1,500 feet of new natural-surface trails and 2,600 feet of improved trails were opened. Located in a residential neighborhood, the site includes a wetland, protected stream, important native plant species, and an older second-growth forest.","","","","Maricara Natural Area"
"251","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
Marquam Nature Park is a linear trail that starts south of downtown at the foot of the West Hills. It supports an abundance of native plant species, and has several trails that wind up the hill and through trees such as Douglas fir, Western hemlock, Red cedar, and Bigleaf maples. The trail system goes to Council Crest and the Oregon Zoo. The main trail is less than a mile, with 10 marker posts. The parking lot is located on Sam Jackson Parkway uphill from Terwilliger Blvd. A shelter with information about the park is located at the base of the trail.","This park is maintained with the volunteer assistance of the <a href="http://www.fmnp.org" target="_blank">Friends of Marquam Nature Park</a>.","Philip A. Marquam, originally from Baltimore, Maryland, came to Portland via California in 1851. He practiced law and invested in real estate, including the Fulton District, Marquam Hill, and what is now part of Riverview Cemetery. He became a judge in 1862 and a state legislator in 1882. According to The Oregonian on April 2, 1934, Marquam was "one of Portland's picturesque pioneers, prominent in the legal, economic, sporting, educational, and theatrical history of Portland."","","Marquam Nature Park"
"252","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm","","Marshall Park was donated to the City of Portland by F. C. and Addie Marshall. According to a letter from the Superintendent of Parks to the City Attorney on May 14, 1947, Mr. Marshall had been devoting himself for the ten years since his retirement "to transforming an abandoned quarry and the marginal ground, some ten or eleven acres in all, into a charming little park which he would like to dedicate without too much fuss to the recreational use of the public." The property was officially accepted as a gift from the Marshalls on June 13, 1951. Additional acreage was added to the original donation in the 1950s.
 
Marshall Park is primarily a natural area developed with hiking trails located in the middle of a 400-foot-wide canyon. The canyon is a natural drainage basin formed by the west slope of the Palatine Hills, the hills northwest of Mt Sylvania, and by Tryon Creek that runs through it. Within the park is a waterfall framed by rock boulders. One of the notable features of the trail system is a small stone bridge which spans Tryon Creek. The playground within the park sits on what was once the foundation of the Marshall's summer home.","","Marshall Park"
"259","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","McKenna Park"
"261","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Merrifield Park"
"264","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","This park is maintained with the volunteer assistance of Jane's Park group. To volunteer at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","The untiring efforts of Jane Baker, an East Portland neighborhood leader who died in April 2002, turned an overgrown vacant lot behind Midland Library into a park. She envisioned a park where residents from all over the area could visit with birds and butterflies, trees and plants; where people could sit on benches and read - or walk on paths among the trees; where local students could be involved in designing, planting, and maintaining a park; and where the books inside the library could be made more real for children - and adults - through connections with the park. Since the mid-County area was unincorporated at that time, Jane knew that whatever got done in the "park" would have to be done by volunteer effort. During the late 70s and early 80s, Jane organized volunteer clean-up crews to get rid of the brush and blackberry bushes which covered the lot. She secured a donation of sawdust to cover paths which were carved out by a National Guard crew. With another donation of more than a dozen, hand-made bird houses, and her personal contribution of plantings to stabilize the bank along the north side of the site, her park began to take shape.
 
Jane's plan involved using the park as a teaching tool for students in local schools. This living lab would allow students to learn how plants and animals lived together in a natural habitat in an urban setting. The proximity to the library was an added benefit in that people of all ages could learn about the natural world just outside its doors. Although Jane never saw the completion of the park, friends and neighbors formed Jane's Park Group to ensure that her vision was implemented. Today Midland Park is a fitting memorial to this dedicated volunteer.
<p>","","Midland Park"
"265","","","In 1946, Dick Fagan returned from World War II to resume his journalistic career with the <I>Oregon Journal</I>. His office, on the second floor above Front Street (now Naito Parkway), gave him a view of not only the busy street, but also an unused hole in the median where a light pole was to be placed. When no pole arrived to fill in this hole, weeds took over the space. Fagan decided to take matters into his own hands and to plant flowers.
 
Fagan wrote a popular column called Mill Ends (rough, irregular pieces of lumber left over at lumber mills). He used this column to describe the park and the various "events" that occurred there. Fagan billed the space as the "World's Smallest Park." The park was dedicated on St. Patrick's Day in 1948 since Fagan was a good Irishman. He continued to write about activities in the park until he died in 1969. Many of his columns described the lives of a group of leprechauns, who established the "only leprechaun colony west of Ireland" in the park. Fagan claimed to be the only person who could see the head leprechaun, Patrick O'Toole. After Mill Ends officially became a city park on St. Patrick’s Day in 1976, the park continued to be the site of St. Patrick's Day festivities.
 
Over the years, contributions have been made to the park, such as the small swimming pool and diving board for butterflies, many statues, a miniature Ferris wheel (which was brought in by a normal-sized crane), and the occasional flying saucer. The events held here include concerts by Clan Macleay Pipe Band, picnics, and rose plantings by the Junior Rose Festival Court.
 
The park had to be moved temporarily in 2006 due to construction on Naito Parkway. It was replaced on March 16, 2007 in true St. Patrick's Day style with the Royal Rosarians, bagpipers, and the Fagan family, including Dick's wife Katherine, in attendance.","","Mill Ends Park"
"266","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Mill Park"
"268","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","The name of the area around this park got its start as Mount Tabor Villa in the 1890s. After the Mt. Tabor Street Railway Company started running an East Portland route from what is now Grand Ave to SE 55 Ave, development in the Tabor area exploded. Montavilla was one of the names given to neighborhoods by their developers. Also created were North Mt. Tabor, Tabor Heights, Tabordale, and East Tabor Villa neighborhoods.","","Montavilla Park"
"271","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
Wading pool hours: M-F, June 19-Aug 17, 11:30am-7:30pm
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","This park is named for the outspoken editor of the Oregonian in the late 1800s and early 1900s, Henry W. Scott, brother of Abigail Scott Duniway for whom Duniway Park was named.","","Mt Scott Park"
"275","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. The park is closed to motor vehicles all day Wednesday, and from 10:00pm to 5:00am all other days. The road gates at Salmon, Lincoln/Harrison, and Yamhill Streets will be closed during those times.
 
To reserve a picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/fish/index.cfm?c=31006&a=280021" target="_blank">Mt Tabor Bird List</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=53192&" target="_blank">Mt Tabor Invasive Plant Control & Revegetation Project</a>","This park is maintained with the volunteer assistance of the <a href="http://www.taborfriends.com/" target="_blank">Friends of Mt Tabor Park</a>. To find out how you can help at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","Portland's Mt Tabor, a volcanic cinder cone, was named by Plympton Kelly, son of Oregon City pioneer resident Clinton Kelly, after Mt Tabor in Israel, six miles east of Nazareth. In 1894, the city built two open reservoirs on the site (two other open reservoirs were built in 1911). By 1900, Portland's growing eastside population demanded park space; in 1903 landscape architect John C. Olmsted recommended the city obtain more land at Mt Tabor. In 1909, the Board of Park Commissioners used voter-approved bonds to buy approximately forty lots on Mt Tabor for $366,000.
 
Portland Parks Superintendent Emanuel Tillman Mische, who had worked with the Olmsted Brothers' landscape design firm in Massachusetts, developed a naturalistic design for the park. The plan included long flights of stairs, gently curving parkways, numerous walking trails, and a nursery yard. It also showcased native plants. In 1912, construction workers discovered volcanic cinders which were later utilized in surfacing the park's roads.
 
At the crest of the park is a bronze statue of Harvey W. Scott, editor of The Oregonian newspaper from 1865-1872 and from 1877 until his death in 1910. A gift to the city by Scott's widow, Margaret, and family, it was sculpted by Gutzon Borglum in the early 1930s while at work on his monumental sculpture of four American presidents on Mt Rushmore in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Cast by the Kunst Foundry in New York, it was unveiled in June 1933 with great ceremony.","","Mt Tabor Park"
"292","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/MultnomahArtsCenter?sk=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","Visit the MAC website at <a href="http://www.multnomahartscenter.org" target="_blank">www.multnomahartscenter.org</a>
 
<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","The Multnomah Center, located in the former Multnomah School, offers a wide range of services to the Portland community. The building was acquired by Portland Parks & Recreation in 1978, was renovated, and was opened to the public in 1982. The Multnomah Arts Center, housed in the Multnomah Center, offers arts education to all ages and has been doing so for over 25 years. Before moving into the new building, MAC was located in the Multnomah Village volunteer fire department and was called the Multnomah Community Design Center.","5038232787","Multnomah Arts Center"
"402","","","","","Holman Park"
"444","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Normandale Park"
"447","Park hours: 5:00am-9:00pm","","These blocks were some of the original park properties in the city. Captain John Couch dedicated the blocks to the City in 1869. City plats show the park blocks continuing to Front Street, but Tanner Creek and poor drainage were obstacles to development and land north of Glisan remained vacant. The original design concept for the North Park Blocks was for a continuation of the South Park Blocks promenade. However, the linking was impeded early on by Benjamin Stark's reluctance to give the city the two blocks between Ankeny and Stark. The six blocks between Salmon and Stark donated by Daniel Lownsdale became part of a legal battle with his second wife's heirs. The court ruled in their favor and the property was eventually sold and developed. On the remaining blocks, trees were planted in rows like those in the South Park Blocks, using Big leaf maples and Black locusts with American elms at the street edge.
 
By the 1880s, the area was predominantly residential, but not fashionable like the South Park Blocks. Modest one- and two-story houses were built. From the turn of the century, more commercial and light industrial businesses and residential hotels were developed in the area. The railroad purchased the land north of Park to Front and expanded its rail yards.
 
In 1908, the People's Institute operated a playground and welfare program in the North Park Blocks. The next year the Park Commission added play equipment and took over. This became the Portland's first supervised playground, separating the boys from the girls. It became popular citywide. In 1920, tennis courts were built in the northernmost block and play areas were developed between Everett and Glisan. Also built around this time were two brick restrooms in the Ankeny block. As more playgrounds were developed in other parks, and commercial and industrial uses pushed out residential use, the park began to decline. Many large trees were damaged in the 1962 Columbus Day storm and were removed, changing the character of the park.
 
In 1992, a series of improvements was completed in the North Parks Blocks. Pains were taken to protect and preserve the remaining historic trees that had stood there since the park's inception. Light fixtures were replaced with the same style of ornamental ones now in the South Park Blocks. Different colored paving stones were used on the pathways to create bright, winding lanes. In 1993, a new playground was built and its popularity brought some vitality back to the park.
 
In October 2002, a 12-foot bronze sculpture was installed between Burnside and Couch streets. A replica of a wine pitcher from the late Shang Dynasty (circa 1200-1100 BC), this sculpture is about sixteen times larger than the original. The young elephant standing peacefully on his father's back symbolizes safe and prosperous offspring. The elaborate surface decoration features cloud-shaped curves and birds and animals from ancient Chinese mythology. The piece is titled <i>Da Tung & Xi'an Bao Bao</i>. Da Tung may be translated as "universal peace" or "large bronze." Xi'an Bao Bao means "baby elephant."
The sculpture was a gift to the city from Chinese businessman Huo Baozhu, whose foundry in Xi'an, China, is licensed by the national government to reproduce Chinese antiquities. Huo, who visited Portland a number of times, said he was motivated by a love of Chinese history and admiration for Portland.
 
In February 2005, a fountain designed by the famous weimaraner dog photographer William Wegman was installed between Davis and Everett streets. <i>Portland Dog Bowl</i> measures 8x10 feet with checkerboard black and white granite tiles to resemble a patch of linoleum kitchen floor; four of the squares are artificial turf. Wegman designed the cast-bronze dog bowl, with water burbling up from an underground source, to be reminiscent of the Benson bubbler drinking fountains placed around town in 1912 by philanthropist Simon Benson.
<p>","","North Park Blocks"
"449","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","North Powellhurst Park"
"451","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Northgate Park"
"488","Park hours: 5:00am-9:00pm","","This site is supposedly near the clearing where W.C. Overton and Asa Lovejoy agreed to found a town in November 1843. The square itself is named for Hugh Donaldson O'Bryant, a pioneer who migrated to Oregon from Georgia in 1843. O'Bryant was a carpenter who showed his civic pride in 1850 when he founded Portland's first public library. He was elected as Portland's first mayor in the city's first election on April 7, 1851, by receiving 104 of the 222 votes cast.
 
In the early 1900s, the Rivoli Theater and the Basket Grocery were the two best known features on the block. Built by Robert S. Farrell, business and political leader and one of the founders of the Multnomah Athletic Club, the Rivoli Theater was famous for its vaudeville acts. At the beginning of World War II, with stage acts a thing of the past, it was renamed the Newsreel Theater. The grocery was one of the finest gourmet delicatessens in Portland for 50 years before it was closed in 1969.
 
In 1971 the property was donated to the city by Mr. and Mrs. William E. Roberts. Built mostly of brick and concrete, the square was designed by Donald Edmundson and Evan Kennedy of the Portland firm of Daniel, Mann, Johnson & Mendenhall, and was dedicated in December 1973. O'Bryant Square's dominant feature is a bronze fountain in the shape of a rose, fittingly titled <I>Fountain to a Rose</I>. It was made possible through a $28,000 bequest from Donald Card Sloan, who was a prime minister of the Royal Rosarians in 1953. Its inscription reads "May you find peace in this garden." The fountain is surrounded by 250 rose bushes and other plants. Beneath the fountain's jets an underground parking garage accommodates 90 cars, making it the first park with parking in the city. In 1976, O'Bryant Square received a national design award from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.","","O'Bryant Square"
"490","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. North parking lot closed at 10:00pm.
 
This area is a birdwatcher's paradise. Hawks, quail, pintails, mallards, coots, woodpeckers, kestrels, and widgeons are just the start of the list of birds that one might encounter in Oaks Bottom. The star of the show, though, is the Great blue heron, the official bird of the City of Portland. Oaks Bottom is one of the favorite places of a score of these impressive birds because of its proximity to one of the rookeries on Ross Island.
 
Visit <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/portlandmigratorybirds/" target="_blank">Portland Migratory Birds</a> for more info.
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/fish/index.cfm?c=31006&a=280023" target="_blank">Oaks Bottom Bird List</a>","The Friends of Oaks Bottom is a volunteer organization of interested citizens working in partnership with Portland Parks & Recreation for the promotion, preservation, and management of Oaks Bottom. The Friends participate in habitat restoration, trail maintenance, guided hikes, information programs, and the publication of a newsletter. For more information, call 503-823-6131.","The Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge is a 140-acre floodplain wetland located along the east bank of the Willamette River. It is rare for such a natural wetland to exist in the heart of a city. Part of the park is built on a sanitation landfill consisting of 400,000 cubic feet of construction waste material layered with soil. The City of Portland acquired the landfill property from the Donald M. Drake Company at the beginning of 1969 to block its development as an industrial park. The area was believed, at the time, to be one of the few remaining marshland areas in Portland, and local residents were strongly opposed to its development as industrial property.","","Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge"
"492","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
For rental info on Oaks Pioneer Church, visit the website at <a href="http://www.oakspioneerchurch.org" target="_blank">www.oakspioneerchurch.org</a> or call 503-234-3570.","","Oaks Pioneer Church, originally St. John's Episcopal Church, was built in 1851 on the outskirts of the pioneer town of Milwaukie. By 1960 the old church had fallen into disuse and was scheduled for demolition, but thanks to the efforts of civic leaders, funds were raised to hire LaBeck and Son to move the old church. In 1961 the church was shipped by barge to the ferry slip on the end of Spokane Street, placed in its current location at the edge of Sellwood Park, and renamed Oaks Pioneer Church. It was restored by the Sellwood-Moreland Improvement League (SMILE) and is now listed as a Portland Historical Landmark and is included in the National Register of Historic Places.","","Oaks Pioneer Church & Park"
"495","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Oregon Park"
"497","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>","The nearby Overlook House is managed by the Friends of the Overlook House. For rental information, go to <a href="http://www.historicoverlookhouse.org/" target="_blank">www.historicoverlookhouse.org</a>","","","Overlook Park"
"501","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=234301&c=51821" target="_blank">Parklane Park Master Plan</a>","","The first 5 acres of the park were acquired in 1993 as a transfer from Multnomah County. Three additional parcels, totaling about 20 acres, were purchased from Oregon Asphaltic Paving in 2001 and 2002, and are not currently developed or available for public use.
 
Before the acreage was transferred to the City of Portland, local residents had installed red and white striped playground equipment which led to the park's nickname: Candy Cane Park. Over the years the equipment failed to pass new safety standards, and in the summer of 1996, a new play structure was installed. The new play structure was also brightly painted, and met the current safety code.","","Parklane Park"
"502","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The park is named after pioneer Matthew Patton who owned land in the West Hills as well as in North Portland. Before 1913, North Interstate Avenue was called North Patton Avenue. When the street was connected to a new bridge over the Columbia River, the City renamed it to reflect its new function.","","Patton Square Park"
"503","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","George H. Pendleton was a congressman from Ohio who, in 1864, ran for vice-president of the United States with McClellan against the ticket of Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson.
 
In 2001, a sculpture by Keith Jellum, <i>Vincent, Waiting for Alice</i>, was installed in the park. Inspired by Lewis Carroll's <i>Alice in Wonderland</i>, the piece includes an 8-foot-tall rabbit with a short table with a pair of gloves and a fan on it.","","Pendleton Park"
"506","","","","","Peninsula Crossing Trail"
"507","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
Wading pool hours: M-F, June 19-Aug 17, 2:00-8:00 PM
 
To reserve a sports field, picnic area or wedding site, call 503-823-2525.
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
Tennis court lights are turned off at 10:00 PM.
 
<b>Volunteer Training</b>
Learn how to properly deadhead roses. Attend any session and be qualified to deadhead at Washington Park, Peninsula Park, and Pittock Mansion.
 
<i>Peninsula Park Rose Garden</i>
June 1 & 3 at 9:00 AM - meet at fountain
 
<i>Washington Park International Rose Test Garden</i>
May 17, 24 & 31 at 9:00 AM - meet at kiosk (second hour of training includes tour guide instructions)","<b>Park Features</b>
 
<i>Disc #4</i> a bronze sculpture by Jerry Allen was installed in 1979 along the west side of the park.","Peninsula Park is a good example of a formally designed neighborhood park, typical of the early 1900s. It includes the city's first public rose garden and first community center, an historically designated bandstand, and Portland's second oldest playground.
 
The park was purchased by the city in 1909 for the sum of $60,000 with funds raised in a 1908 bond measure. Originally owned by local businesswoman Liverpool Liz, it had been the site for a roadhouse and racetrack for quarter-mile horse racing. An autopark and campground were also included in the original parcel. Planned by renowned Oregon architects Ellis Lawrence and Ormond R. Bean, the park was a result of Portland's 1912 'City Beautiful' movement. Completed in 1913, much remains of the original features, including the lantern-style streetlights, the stone pillars, vast brickwork, and the nearly 100-year-old fountain in the center of the rose garden.
 
The rose garden, designed by Emanuel L. Mische, is one of Portland's most beautiful formal rose gardens, with 8,900 plantings on a two-acre site. The garden entrance is located on Albina Ave, between Ainsworth & Rosa Parks Way. Visitors are greeted by magnificent plantings of 65 rose varieties which border the steps leading to the sunken rose garden, the only one in Oregon. The rose garden was the showplace of its time, with 300,000 visitors in the first year alone. The official Portland rose, named <I>Mme. Caroline Testout</I>, was cultivated in the garden. Once planted by the thousands along the streets of Portland, this rose earned Portland the name 'City of Roses.' In 1913, floral enthusiasts selected Peninsula Park as the location for an annual rose show. In 1917, Washington Park on Portland’s west side was selected as the site of the International Rose Test Garden and most of the rose show activities were moved there.
 
The octagonal bandstand overlooking the rose garden was constructed in 1913. It was used for World War I patriotic demonstrations and is now the site for many summer weddings and concerts. This wonderful gazebo-like structure is a National Heritage historical structure and was designated a Portland Historic Landmark in 1973. It is the last of its kind in Portland.
 
The Italian villa-style community center is Portland's first and oldest. The Portland Lavendar Club, a dance and social group for women over age 50, originated here and it has been home to a women's volleyball club since the early 1900s. In 1957, the city zoo housed its Humboldt penguins in the center's pool for six months because the zoo lacked the proper facilities when the birds arrived from Antarctica. Many Portlanders still remember calling it Penguin Park!","","Peninsula Park & Rose Garden"
"510","","","Elk Rock, a steep bluff on the lower Willamette River directly west of Elk Rock Island, became the property of Scottish grain exporter Peter Kerr (1862-1957) in the early 1900s. The 13-acre estate included six acres of cultivated English-style gardens that were designed in part by John C. Olmsted of the landscape architectural firm Olmsted Brothers of Brookline, Massachusetts.
 
Mr. Kerr passed away in 1957 and the estate was donated by his heirs to the Episcopal Diocese of Oregon with the agreement that the gardens would be open to the public. They were named the Elk Rock Gardens of the Bishop's Close. This garden and cliff-top estate are in stark contrast to the natural habitat that was given to the city by Peter Kerr in 1940. Elk Rock Island is located in the Willamette River and accessible from Spring Park on the east side of the river in the City of Milwaukie.
 
In 1955, the Kerr family gave the City of Portland a 3-acre parcel south of their estate with the stipulation that the property "shall be used solely as a public park . . ." This natural habitat contains a substantial portion of a 1,200-foot-long railroad tunnel that had been built through Elk Rock.","","Peter Kerr Property"
"511","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Francis W. Pettygrove was one of the early owners and developers of the Portland townsite. He was the winner of the historic coin toss with Asa Lovejoy which determined the name of the city that they founded. Pettygrove, from Portland, Maine, was the owner of Portland's first house, wharf, warehouse, and store.
 
Pettygrove Park, along with Lovejoy Fountain Park, is in what was known in the 1960s as Portland's urban renewal area. Both Lovejoy and Pettygrove Parks were unnamed until the opening of the parks. The same coin that Mr. Lovejoy and Mr. Pettygrove used to determined whether our city would be named Portland or Boston was flipped to determine which park would be Lovejoy and which would be Pettygrove. Pettygrove Park, 300 yards away from the crashing cascades of water in the Lovejoy Fountain, is composed of serene mounds of grass, trees, and stonework laid out among paths.
 
In 1979, the Portland Development Commission installed Manuel Izquierdo's muntz bronze sculpture, <I>Dreamer</I>, and fountain on SW Third between Market & Harrison. Izquierdo is professor emeritus of Pacific Northwest College of Art.","","Pettygrove Park"
"512","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Piccolo Park"
"513","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Skatepark Stats</b>
 
Size: 11,000 sq ft (3,700 sq ft of street course and 7,300 sq ft of tranny)
 
Tranny: 20-ft diameter full-pipe with a mouse hole in the side. Connects an 11½-ft-deep bowl with a 9½- ft-deep bowl. Has additional 6-ft and 3½-ft-deep bowls.
 
Street Course: granite hubbas, 7-stair, handrails, ledges, and banks.
 
Entrance: 10-ft-wide, 200-ft-long curvilinear skateable entry with ledges and banks. <I>Percent for Art</I> project by artist Adam Kuby.","","The park was named for Stanhope S. Pier, who served as a Portland city commissioner in the late 1920s and as acting mayor in 1931. In 1930, Commissioner Pier proposed several improvements, including a pool in Albina, the expansion of Mt. Scott and Lents Parks, and the development of Pier Park in the style of Laurelhurst, then considered the most beautiful park in the city.","","Pier Park"
"515","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
Visit the Pioneer Courthouse Square website at <a href="http://www.pioneercourthousesquare.org" target="_blank">www.pioneercourthousesquare.org</a>.","","The block was originally bought in 1849 by Elijah Hill, a shoemaker. He paid $24 and a pair of boots. Later the Portland School Board purchased the site and opened Central School in 1858 and was Portland's first real schoolhouse. It was moved to an adjoining street in 1883 to make way for the Portland Hotel which occupied the site from 1890-1951. The elegant hotel was torn down and for the next 30 years the site was a parking lot. In 1979, the City acquired the block from Meier & Frank Company who donated $500,000 toward creating an open space. In 1980, a national design competition was held to select a design team. The winning team was led by Portland architect Will Martin, who died in a plane crash not long after the square was dedicated. Located across from its namesake, the historic Pioneer Courthouse, Pioneer Courthouse Square officially opened April 6, 1984, sharing Portland's birthday 133 years before.
 
The Square's features include the Waterfall Fountain, built of granite; sixteen columns with classical pillars topped with carved yellow roses on which crawl pink-and-green spotted bugs; and two brick amphitheaters which provide seats for events. Other pieces of artwork include Tom Hardy's sculpture of three racing horses and J. Seward Johnson's Allow Me, a bronze statue of a man holding an umbrella. A signpost lets visitors know how far they would have to travel and in which direction to reach sights such as Walden Pond or Moscow's Red Square. And every noon, the Weather Machine performs, forecasting upcoming weather by displaying one of three metal figures amid a show of mist and flashing lights. Helia, a golden sun, indicates a clear, sunny day; Blue Heron predicts mist, drizzle, and changeable weather; and fierce, open-mouthed Dragon forecasts storms. This whimsical machine also tells the temperature.","5032231613","Pioneer Courthouse Square"
"523","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Portland Heights Park"
"524","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/PortlandRaceway?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
Visit the PIR website at <a href="http://www.portlandraceway.com" target="_blank">www.portlandraceway.com</a>","","Portland International Raceway was built on the site of Vanport City, which was destroyed by a flood in 1948. Prior to its destruction, Vanport was the second largest city in Oregon. Vanport was constructed in 1942 to house the thousands of war-time shipbuilders that Henry Kaiser, of Henry Kaiser Industries, had recruited from New York to help with the war effort. Vanport, which was constructed in under a year, was deemed 'The Miracle City.' It had its own post office, nine schools, a fire station, a 400-seat cafeteria, a 785-seat theater, a library, a hospital, fourteen playgrounds, five commercial centers, and a police station staffed by 22 officers.
 
The problem with this instant city was that the quality of housing and building construction left much to be desired. On Sunday, May 30, 1948, just one day after the general manager of Vanport announced that the city was "not in any foreseeable danger" from rising flood waters, a segment of the ring-like dike surrounding the city collapsed. A 12-foot wall of water rushed through the community, wiping out all of the poorly-constructed houses. The residents were never officially notified that they were in danger.","5038237223","Portland International Raceway"
"525","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/Portland-Tennis-Center/264162995290?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=52167" target="_blank">Tennis Program Information</a>","","5038233189","Portland Tennis Center"
"527","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Portsmouth Park"
"528","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/water/index.cfm?c=49189" target="_blank">Powell Butte Nature Park Improvement Project</a> - check here for construction updates
 
Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm. Vehicle access is restricted to the visitor center and parking lot. The entry gate is closed promptly without exception and all visitors should plan on returning to the parking lot in time to vacate the park before closing time. For safety and security reasons, the parking lot access is restricted to the seasonal hours listed below.
 
<b>Fall:</b> 7:00 AM-8:00 PM (Labor Day until switch to Pacific Standard Time)
<b>Winter:</b> 7:00 AM-6:00 PM (until switch to Daylight Savings Time)
<b>Spring:</b> 7:00 AM-8:00 PM (until Memorial Day)
<b>Summer:</b> 7:00 AM-10:00 PM (Memorial Day to Labor Day)
 
<b>Do you bike, hike or ride horses on Powell Butte?</b>
This rainy season you will have the opportunity to participate in a pilot project to test the theory that people can have more trail access and take better care of the trails by staying off them when they are muddy.
 
In past wet seasons, PP&R managed a trail closure program. The problem was that trails were closed when rain was expected or there were only a few wet spots. There were different opinions about what is wet - and when bike tires, horse hooves, feet or paws could damage trails. PP&R listened to trail user frustrations and agreed to a one-season pilot project to test the theory that trail users can take good care of a nature park using self-management on trails.
 
You will see new signs posted at trailheads and trail junctions: <i>Trails closed when muddy</i> If a trail is dry, enjoy! If a trail is muddy and you can see your tracks, please do not use it. As always, please use consideration when passing other trail users. Thanks for taking care of Powell Butte Nature Park!
 
<i>This is a collaborative effort with Portland Parks & Recreation, Northwest Trail Alliance, Friends of Powell Butte, and equestrians.</i>","The Friends of Powell Butte is an organization consisting of neighbors and friends dedicated to and concerned about the qualities and resources of Powell Butte Nature Park. The association works closely with PP&R in planning and implementing park improvements, and providing volunteer services and citizen input. Monthly meetings are held the third Thursday of each month at the caretaker's residence near the parking lot. For more info, go to <a href="http://www.friendsofpowellbutte.org" target="_blank">Friends of Powell Butte</a>.","Powell Butte, an extinct cinder cone volcano, rises near the headwaters of Johnson Creek - an urban creek with remnant populations of native salmon and steelhead. The park is comprised of 608 acres of meadowland and forest.
 
Before the turn of the century, the large meadow area was cleared and an orchard planted. In 1925 the City of Portland purchased the land from George Wilson for future water reservoirs, but continued to lease the northeast portion of the property to Henry Anderegg, a farmer and owner of Meadowland Crest Dairy, until 1948 when the farming was discontinued. However, dairy cattle were permitted to graze on the acreage to preserve the pastures. In the mid-1970s the Water Bureau prepared a development plan for Powell Butte that called for the construction of four 50-million gallon underground reservoirs to be located at the north end of the butte. In 1981 the first, and only, reservoir was built and still serves as the hub of the Water Bureau's distribution system. Also, the Powell Valley Water District has three reservoirs on the butte. In 1987 the City officially established Powell Butte as a nature park and the park was opened to the public in 1990.
Today, miles of trails accommodate hikers, mountain bikers, and horseback riders. Abundant wildlife populates the park, including rabbits, ring-necked pheasants, ground squirrels, raccoons, gray foxes, skunks, bats, chipmunks, coyotes, and black-tailed mule deer. The park is home to many birds of prey with its open meadows, groves of wild hawthorn trees, forested slopes of Western red cedar, and wetlands near Johnson Creek.","","Powell Butte Nature Park"
"530","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Powell Park"
"531","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
<a href="http://www.southportlandna.org/southportlandriverbank/" target="_blank">Click here</a> for information on the South Portland Riverbank Project.","","The park was named after Ira Powers, owner of Powers Furniture Company, who lived in Dunthorpe. Around the time of the Depression, he and other real estate associates gave the land to the city for the extension of Terwilliger Boulevard past what is now Tryon Creek State Park, connecting Lake Oswego with where Lewis & Clark Law School now stands. Historical information courtesy of Isaac Laquedem","","Powers Marine Park"
"561","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Raymond Park"
"562","<a href="http://www.portlandpublicgolf.com/tee-times.htm" target="_blank">Reserve</a> a tee time online or call 503-646-5166.
 
Visit the RedTail Golf Course website at <a href="http://www.golfredtail.com" target="_blank">www.golfredtail.com</a>.","","This property was once an old farm, acquired by the city in order to create an 18-hole golf course to replace the 9-hole West Hills Golf Course which was closed to make room for the zoo's relocation. The course was designed Erv Thoreson, a landscape architect with the Park Bureau. Construction of the course, named Progress Downs by Commissioner Bean, began in 1966 and opened for play in 1968. In 1999, the course was completely redesigned by PP&R Golf Manager John Zoller into a 7,100 yard, championship 18-hole course with a covered, lighted driving range. It was renamed RedTail Golf Course after the red-tailed hawks that nest in the surrounding trees.","5036465166","RedTail Golf Course"
"563","The garden will be relocated in 2007.","","","5038231612","Reed Community Garden"
"565","","","","","Ivon Park"
"568","","","","","Rocky Butte Natural Area"
"570","<a href="http://www.portlandpublicgolf.com/tee-times.htm" target="_blank">Reserve</a> a tee time online or call 503-253-4744.
 
Visit the Rose City Golf Course website at <a href="http://www.rosecitygc.com/" target="_blank">www.rosecitygc.com</a>.","","This is the spot once occupied by the Portland Country Club. The first nine holes of today's golf course used to be one of four racetracks which are now park property. A spectacle sponsored by the American Legion featured a head-on collision between two locomotives. This was also the first landing field for airplanes in the vicinity. Today, this golf course features challenging long par 4s and tree-lined fairways.","5032534744","Rose City Golf Course"
"573","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Rose City Park"
"574","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Roselawn Park"
"575","","","","","Rosemont Bluff Natural Area"
"578","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Sabin Community Garden"
"580","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Sacajawea, as all of Oregon's schoolchildren know, was the wife of Toussaint Charbonneau, the Frenchman hired by Lewis and Clark to lead them across the west. Although Charbonneau was supposed to know his way, Sacajawea, a Shoshone Indian, wound up being the real guide. Charbonneau was relegated to the role of interpreter. This park and school are named in Sacajawea's honor. The statue of Sacajawea in Washington Park was the first statue honoring a woman to be unveiled in the United States.","","Sacajawea Park"
"663","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sellwood-Community-Center/111866695521248" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","This building was originally constructed as a residential hotel for the men who worked in the old Sellwood Log Mill. In 1910 it became the first branch of the YMCA. The City of Portland purchased the facility in 1920 as its second community center. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006, one of only three such designated buildings in the neighborhood. It is also a City of Portland Historic Landmark.","5038233195","Sellwood Community Center"
"666","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. Parking lot closed at 10:00pm.
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>","","In 1893, the town of Sellwood was merged into Portland, but has managed to keep its own identity throughout the years. The area is named for John Sellwood, an Episcopal minister who owned the land claim in what is now the Sellwood area. Sellwood Park used to be the site of the City View Racetrack.","","Sellwood Park"
"668","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight. Parking lot closed at 10:00pm.","","","","Sellwood Riverfront Park"
"669","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Sewallcrest Community Garden"
"670","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Sewallcrest Park"
"672","Most visitors to the lakes can find beaver, river otter, black-tailed deer, osprey, bald eagles, and one of the largest remaining populations of Western painted turtles in Oregon. Access to the wildlife area is either by the Interlakes Trail - a paved, accessible trail that includes two wildlife viewing platforms - or by non-motorized boat. There is a canoe launch area as well as restrooms, interpretive displays, a covered shelter, parking for 40 cars, a bus drop-off, and public art.","For more information, visit <a href="http://www.oregonmetro.gov/parks/" target="_blank">Metro Parks</a>.","This natural area is the largest protected wetland within an American city even though it is surrounded by port terminals, warehouses, and other commercial developments. In 1990, the Portland Planning Commission approved a management plan for the lakes. They determined that Smith Lake would be maintained at a fairly constant water level and developed for low-intensity water recreation, such as fishing and canoeing. Bybee Lake, on the other hand, would be allowed to rise and fall with the tides and seasons and would be kept as an environmental preserve.","5037971850","Smith and Bybee Wetlands Natural Area"
"674","Park hours: 5:00am-9:00pm","","In 1852 Daniel H. Lownsdale designated eleven narrow blocks of his plat at the western edge of town for public park space. Between 1852-75 the park was an unimproved roadway on the outskirts of the city center; the southern portion up to Jefferson was part of the Great Plank Road. During the 1870s the area became a fashionable residential neighborhood with large Italianate mansions, schools, and churches. In 1877 the first landscaping of these blocks occurred when the City Council authorized florist and landscape designer Louis G. Pfunder to plant 104 Lombardy poplars and elms between Salmon and Hall. The Ladd School opened on the present Portland Art Museum site in 1879. In 1885 the city's first parkkeeper was appointed and a more formal park began to develop. Over the years, much has been added to the park, but there seems to be consensus that the blocks should remain "a cathedral of trees with a simple floor of grass."
 
By the 1880s many lots were subdivided for smaller residences; by the turn of the century, apartment buildings were developed. Lincoln High School was located at Park and Market. This later became the first Portland State University building. The campus from Market to Jackson was established in the 1950s. In 1973 the campus was redesigned and streets closed off.
 
Today there are twelve South Park Blocks stretching through the heart of downtown Portland. Each park block features artwork. On the block between Hall and Harrison is the most recent addition. Installed in 2004, this work made of white Indiana limestone by Oregon sculptor Donald Wilson is entitled <I>Holon</I>. The word comes from the Greek <I>holos</I> which means whole, entire, complete in all its parts - something that has integrity and identity at the same time as it is a part of a larger system. A block north at Montgomery is the 1973 bronze statue and fountain <I>Farewell to Orpheus</I> by Frederic Littman (1907-79).
 
In the center of the block between Market and Clay is a granite mosaic sculpture by Oregon artist Paul Sutinen. <I>In the Shadow of the Elm</I>, installed in 1984, depicts the shadow of a tree that may have once existed within the grid of trees in the block. In the center of the block between Columbia and Jefferson is a very different sculpture, also installed in 1984. In <I>Peace Chant</I>, comprised of three large granite pillars, Steve Gillman wished to express his own advocacy for peace as well as that of the nearby churches. In May 1985 the City Council named this block Peace Plaza.
 
Between Jefferson and Madison stands an 18-foot-tall bronze equestrian statue of Theodore Roosevelt by New York sculptor Alexander Phimister Proctor (1860-1950), who was known for his western art. Mounted on a 14-foot tall base of California granite, the statue entitled <i>Theodore Roosevelt - Rough Rider</i> portrays the colonel in the actual uniform and accoutrements he wore in his famous ascent of San Juan Hill during the Spanish-American War. It was presented to the city by Dr. Henry Waldo Coe. When Dr. Coe was just beginning his medical practice in 1884 in North Dakota, he met the young Roosevelt, who was there trying to regain his health. Their friendship lasted until Roosevelt's death in 1919. Aside from his personal friendship, Coe (who moved to Portland in 1891) admired Roosevelt's politics. It was mostly for this reason that he decided to express his admiration in the form of a public statue. Calvin Coolidge broke ground for the statue in August 1922 and it was unveiled on November 11 of that year. The block was named Roosevelt Square.
 
The block between Madison and Main was named Lincoln Square because of the 10-foot bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln on a granite base. Sculpted by George Fite Waters and donated by Dr. Henry Waldo Coe, it was unveiled on October 5, 1928.
 
Located between Main and Salmon is the Shemanski Fountain, given to the city by Joseph Shemanski in 1926 to "express in small measure gratitude for what the city has done for me." Shemanski (1869-1951) was a Polish immigrant who started out as a traveling clock salesman before he founded the Eastern Outfitting Co. and became an extremely successful businessman. The triangular structure of cast Oregon sandstone was designed by Carl L. Linde, a local architect whose work included many fine homes, hotels, and apartments. The fountain includes three small, low drinking basins for dogs.
 
The original design included a large central planter, but after the fountain was erected, Shemanski felt that a sculpture would better complete the graceful cupola. He commissioned Oliver Laurence Barrett, an art professor at the University of Oregon, to create a bronze statue of <I>Rebecca at the Well</I>. It is not clear why Rebecca was chosen, but as the wife of Isaac in the Old Testament known for her hospitality to strangers and kindness to animals, she was a fitting choice.
 
At the northern end of the block at Salmon sits the Simon Benson Memorial which was constructed in 1959. It was planned by architect Albert E. Doyle while designing the Benson Hotel. A round bronze plaque with a bas relief of Simon Benson, timber baron and philanthropist, is mounted on the curved brick wall with stone benches. He looks out at a drinking fountain which represents one of the 24 bowl fountains that Benson gave to the city in 1912.
 
The newest park on the Blocks is Simon & Helen Director Park located between Taylor & Morrison. The site was a surface parking lot donated to the city by real estate developer Tom Moyer who also made a substantial contribution toward the design and construction of the park. Another generous contribution was made by philanthropist Jordan Schnitzer who named the park in honor of not only his maternal grandparents, but of all immigrants who helped to build Portland. The design team was led by internationally-renowned landscape architect Laurie Olin whose projects include Bryant Park and Battery Park in New York City and Canary Wharf in London.
<p>","","South Park Blocks"
"678","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Spring Garden Park"
"679","","The Springwater Corridor is the major southeast segment of the 40-Mile Loop which was inspired by the 1903 Olmsted plan of a parkway and boulevard loop to connect park sites. The eventual developed trail will be over 21 miles long.
 
For the most part, the trail is well separated from the public road. The route is a scenic one, encompassing wetlands, buttes, agricultural fields and pastures, residential and industrial neighborhoods. Close to Johnson Creek, one of the last free-flowing streams in Portland's urban area, the trail criss-crosses the stream on its course to the Willamette River. The Corridor connects several parks and open spaces including Tideman Johnson Nature Park, Beggars-tick Wildlife Refuge, the I-205 Bike Path, Leach Botanical Garden, Powell Butte Nature Park, and Gresham's Main City Park.
 
The Springwater Corridor is a multi-use trail. The paved surface is generally 10-12 feet wide with soft shoulders. The hard surface trail is designed to accommodate walkers, joggers, hikers, bicycles, wheelchairs, and strollers. Equestrian use is more common east of I-205 where a separate soft surface path meanders away from the main trail where topography allows.
 
Most of the wildlife found along the Corridor are those species capable of co-existing with humans. Common species include crow, robin, starling, song sparrow, Bewick's wren, house finch, cedar waxwing, violet-green swallow, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, mallard, wood duck, bushtit, black-capped chickadee, raccoon, opossum, nutria, and mole species. Less developed areas support greater diversity, including black-tailed deer, coyote, deer mouse, vole, bat, western fly-catcher, black-headed grosbeak, orange-crowned warbler, common merganser, and woodpecker. Mountain lions have been sighted.
 
Himalayan blackberry used to dominate much of the Springwater landscape. It is a non-native plant and so invasive that it chokes out native plants. Over a decade of projects have helped control invasive plants and improve wildlife habitat. Look beneath the PGE transmission lines for new plantings of native shrubs and small trees such as red-osier dogwood, elderberry, Indian plum, and willow. Some of the adjacent natural areas such as Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge and Beggars-tick Wildlife Refuge feature a wide variety of habitats including open water, shrub/scrub marsh, cattail/smartweed marsh, and forested wetland; Powell Butte Nature Park features open meadow with stands of orchard trees and forested slopes below; and Tideman Johnson Natural Area contains a small riparian woodland.
 
Johnson Creek and the Springwater Corridor are intertwined, with at least 10 trail bridges over the creek. The creek was once host to abundant native fish populations, including threatened salmon species. Following a series of floods in the mid-1990s, the City of Portland began acquiring properties in the Johnson Creek floodplain. Protected as natural areas, these properties provide flood storage, wildlife habitat, and opportunities for wildlife observation along the Corridor. Ongoing streambank restoration will improve habitat and water quality for threatened fish species.","The Springwater Corridor is a former rail corridor; the Springwater Division Line was developed for rail service in 1903. By 1906, under a joint ownership with Portland General Electric and the Portland Railway Light and Power Company, the line reached its peak usage. By 1910, the company had six electric plants and 161 miles of rail, carrying 16,000 passengers each year on a citywide system.
 
In addition to passengers, the rail hauled farm produce to Portland markets. It was at this time it acquired the name Springwater Line, probably because of the planned connection to the community of Springwater on the Clackamas River. It was also known as the Portland Traction Company Line, the Cazadero Line, and the Bellrose Line.
 
Many communities developed along the Springwater Line including Sellwood, Waverley Heights, Eastmoreland, Woodstock, Errol Heights, Lents, Powellhurst-Gilbert, and Pleasant Valley. Towns that developed along the line include Milwaukie, Gresham, Boring, Eagle Creek, Estacada, and Cazadero. During the peak of the railroad era, the Springwater Line was the linkage between these communities. To encourage weekend use, the rail corporation developed destination parks along the line such as Oaks Amusement Park on the banks of the Willamette River in Sellwood. These parks became major attractions, drawing thousands of passengers each weekend. Passenger service was discontinued in 1958.
 
Much of Springwater Corridor was acquired by the City of Portland in 1990, with additional acquisitions by Metro in the following years. Master planning for the Corridor began in 1991, and included input from citizens, agencies, organizations, and municipalities, including Portland Department of Transportation; Oregon Department of Transportation; the cities of Gresham and Milwaukie; Metro; Clackamas and Multnomah counties; the 40 Mile Loop Land Trust; and the Johnson Creek Corridor Committee. Construction of the initial Portland segment was completed September 1996. The trail through Gresham was built in 1996 and an additional mile east of Gresham was built in 2000. With the completion of a 3-mile segment from SE Ivon to SE Umatilla Streets (known as Springwater on the Willamette) in 2005, the part of the trail within Portland is nearly complete.","","Springwater Corridor"
"680","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/stjohnscommunitycenter?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","This center was originally part of a recreation complex that served the large number of workers in the Kaiser shipyards during World War II. When the war was over, the pre-fabricated building was dismantled and moved on flatbed trucks, piece by piece, to its current location. This new home was two blocks from the center of downtown St Johns, at the edge of a large cherry and prune orchard. Some of the old fruit trees still stand on the center's grounds.
<p>","5038233192","St Johns Community Center"
"681","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","The park is located in the community of St Johns, which was named in honor of settler James John. In 1846 he built a brick house at the edge of the river on what was once an Indian camping ground. He filed for a Donation Land Grant of 320 acres in 1850. In 1852, he operated a general merchandise store in part of his house as well as a ferry across the river. James John laid out part of his property as an eight-block town site which was platted in 1865 with an eight-block addition in 1868. It was named for him in 1892. It is said his reputation as a hermit and recluse inspired the title "Saint" John. One explanation for the additional 's' that now appears in the town's name is that the area may have been referred to as St John's - meaning that the place belonged to James John - and the apostrophe was eventually dropped. <I>(Information provided by Maureen O. Wilson)</I>","","St Johns Park"
"682","","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=52167" target="_blank">Tennis Program Information</a>","","5038233629","St Johns Racquet Center"
"711","This area is part of the Willamette watershed, one of three major watersheds in southwest Portland. Stephens Creek, a perennial creek with an average depth of 6.5 inches, bisects the park and flows in a northwest to southeast direction. Portions of the creek above and below the site are culverted as it flows through urbanized southwest Portland. Custer Creek empties into the park from a culvert located just east of the junction of SW Capital Hill Road and SW 17th Avenue. The confluence of Custer and Stephens Creeks is located within the park. The park is valued as neighborhood open space and as a refuge for wildlife and native plants.","","","","Stephens Creek Nature Park"
"714","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Sumner-Albina Park"
"715","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","Sunnyside School Park"
"793","","","The construction of Terwilliger Boulevard was first mentioned in landscape architect John C. Olmsted's 1903 report to the Portland Park Board. Olmsted envisioned a comprehensive system of parks and parkways for all of Portland - with Terwilliger Blvd, or South Hillside Parkway as he called it, becoming the principal pleasure drive leading south from the city. John and his brother, Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., felt that boulevards and parkways were important additions to cities and added a feeling of civility to movement in an urban area. Of the four proposed parkway systems, Terwilliger is the only one completed for public use and utilized as envisioned by its planners.
 
The parkway got its name from the James Terwilliger family. James came to Oregon in 1845, built a log cabin at what is now SW First and Morrison St, and opened a blacksmith shop. He traded an eastside land claim for a horse, then traded that horse for 640 acres in Portland's west hills. In 1854, he, his wife, and some adjacent landholders donated a total of 10 acres that became the city cemetery. James died in 1892 and his heirs donated 19.24 acres in the form of a right-of-way through the Terwilliger property in 1909 as a part of the development of Terwilliger Blvd. The deeds stated that the donated land was intended to form part of the "Park and Boulevard System of the City of Portland."
 
Nothing was done to develop the parkway until 1909 when Portland lawyer Joseph Simon became mayor. By the end of his two-year term, the city had a design for the parkway, received gifts of land, purchased 2.84 acres and graded the portion between Hamilton and Slavin Roads. The 200-foot right-of-way was designed to ensure that no buildings would be built to obstruct the views. The formal dedication was held on August 4, 1914, and more than 200 autos paraded along the boulevard. The road was illuminated by electric lights, making the road seem "as light as day."
 
There was a great deal of discussion in 1917 regarding the surface of the roadway. It was not completely paved and the surface had begun to deteriorate. The boulevard had become one of the best routes between downtown and the southwest, and some people wanted to open Terwilliger to commercial traffic. The Oregon Railway and Navigation Company (which had donated 41.2 acres) and the heirs of James Terwilliger threatened to reclaim the right-of-way. The city attorney pointed out that much of the land was given expressly to "be used forever as a boulevard and parkway for the benefit and use of the public," and if the city failed in this or in the improvement of the parkway, the land would immediately revert to those granting the gift. The city paved the road within a year.
 
In 1959, the City created a special design zone for the parkway to retain its "heavily wooded character." In 1983 the City Council enacted the Terwilliger Parkway Design Guidelines and the Terwilliger Parkway Corridor Plan to preserve and protect this urban treasure from growing development.
 
A 1.93-acre parcel, located in the heart of Terwilliger Parkway, was owned by Charles and Thelma Norris. A longtime Portland resident and school teacher, Mrs. Norris was a charter member of the American Rhododendron Society. She and her husband planted dozens of rhododendrons on the property. When she died in 1992, she bequeathed the property to Portland Parks & Recreation.","","Terwilliger Parkway"
"800","","","","",""
"811","","","","","Tenino Property"
"812","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The park, located in the Terrace Trails subdivision, was named PlayHaven after the swim school and day camp that former owners Glen and Joan Wilcox ran on the property for 25 years. The site included an indoor pool, two fields, an archery range, trampoline, tennis courts, and trails. The park is located on what they called the "big field" where children enjoyed games and camp-outs.","","PlayHaven Park"
"814","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","David P. Thompson was close friends with Ulysses S. Grant in the late 1800s. Grant named Thompson the Governor of the Idaho Territory. Later, Thompson became mayor of Portland. He is responsible for the elk statue in the middle of SW Main in the Plaza Blocks. Not surprisingly, the statue is known as the Thompson Elk.","","Thompson Park"
"815","","","This site is named after an early pioneer family whose original land claim included this 6-acre wilderness area. The Johnson family encouraged public use of its property for recreational purposes, sponsoring 4th of July picnics and fireworks. Nestled in a natural gorge along the banks of Johnson Creek, the site was donated to the City of Portland in 1940.","","Tideman Johnson Natural Area"
"820","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Trenton Park"
"824","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","University Park is named after Portland University, a Methodist college which was founded in 1891 in a split from Willamette University. Due to financial difficulties, the school closed in 1900. The campus was located in what is now the University Park neighborhood and later became home of the University of Portland. The original campus building, West Hall (renamed Waldschmidt Hall in 1992), still stands and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.","","University Park"
"825","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=39839&a=333781">UPCC Computer Lab Information</a>
 
<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","This center was built in the early 1940s as part of an enormous federal housing project for ship workers mobilized for the World War II effort. At the time of its construction, it included recreational facilities as well as a restaurant, a fire department with three engines, and administrative offices for the housing project.
 
A wind-driven kinetic sculpture by Jerry Mayer was installed in front of the center on August 31, 1999. Mayer worked closely with the North Portland community to develop <i>Whirlymajig</i>, an altered water pump windmill with a 5-ft diameter fan wheel atop a 30-ft steel flag pool. It metaphorically suggests that we need both physical and mental exercise in order to live happy, healthy lives. Driven by the wind through a system of gears, drive shafts, axels, and drive chains, the sculpture's tail section consists of variously moving aluminum cutouts of arms and legs performing physically and mentally challenging tasks.
 
As part of the center's extensive renovation in 2007, a wall sculpture by Laura Bender was installed in the lobby. <i>From Here to There</i> is a metaphor for the venture of exploration, a story about movement, coordination, and change that references things historical, nautical, and navigational. Movement refers to people relocating here, ships sailing rivers and seas, driftwood swept up on the shores of the Columbia River, and people meeting and forming relationships as they dance, exercise, and move around one another.
<p>","5038233631","University Park Community Center"
"832","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Ventura Park"
"833","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Vermont Hills Community Garden"
"834","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm.","","","",""
"835","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm","","Inspired by the dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC, in 1982, a group Oregon Vietnam veterans conceived of the idea of a veterans memorial in Oregon. Through the efforts of many volunteers on behalf of the Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial Fund, the memorial was dedicated in 1987. Designed by Walker Macy, a Portland landscape architecture firm, the curved black granite wall lists the names of all Oregon residents who died in Vietnam or who are missing in action. The wall also chronicles three years of the conflict and concurrent local events, providing a poignant contrast.
 
Its location in the arboretum provides a serene setting for reflection. The memorial also includes several symbolic components: a bosque of pear trees at the entrance symbolizes life and sacredness; water elements in the Garden of Solace signify life, purity, and hope.","","Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial"
"839","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","This park is named for Hugh W. Wallace, the city councilman responsible for getting the property allocated as a city park.
 
A search of the park and school yard will reveal a curious collection of 11 bronze objects, created by artist Bill Will in 1998, tucked away in unexpected places. Another art installation in the park is a 1980 sculpture by Manuel Izquierdo called <i>Silver Dawn</i>. Izquierdo is professor emeritus of Pacific Northwest College of Art.","","Wallace Park"
"841","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm. Closed to vehicles at 10:00pm.
 
To reserve a sports field, picnic area or the amphitheater, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<a href="http://www.washingtonparkpdx.org/index.htm" target="_blank">Washington Park Attractions</a>","<b>Park Features</b>
In the main circle of the park is the Chiming Fountain. Water drips from one bronze pan to another, and gargoyles around the base spout water. Commissioned by the city for $400 in 1891, the cast iron fountain was created by John (Hans) Staehli, a Swiss woodcarver, who designed it after a Renaissance fountain. Originally the fountain was painted white and was topped by a cast iron figure of a boy holding a staff from which water spouted. At some point over the years, the staff disappeared. The last known record of it was in 1912 when Willis McElroy's band was photographed in the nearby bandstand. In the 1920s, during a spell of freezing weather, water left in the fountain expanded and destroyed the figure of the boy. It was not replaced. In 1960, the fountain was in such disrepair that the city was ready to scrap it. Local longshoreman Francis J. Murnane, whose avocation was the preservation of historic buildings and objects, appealed to Mayor Terry Schrunk and the park bureau was authorized to begin restoration. Much of the original decoration had disappeared so replicas were created from existing pieces for $450. With the additional costs of reassembly and installation, the total came to a little over $1,772 - a good investment!
 
Placed at the entrance to the park, the Lewis and Clark Memorial is a 34-foot, rectangular granite shaft with each side bearing a large bronze replica of the great seals of the States of Oregon, Washington, Montana, and Idaho which comprised the Northwest Territory. This was the only portion of the United States that was acquired by discovery and therefore was never under a foreign flag. President Theodore Roosevelt laid the foundation stone on May 21, 1903. He was assisted by the monument's designer, Portland stonecutter Otto Schumann. The memorial was completed in 1908.
 
<I>Coming of the White Man</I> was given to the city by the heirs of David P. Thompson, an early Portland mayor and donor of the elk statue on Main between the Plaza Blocks. Completed in 1904, this bronze statue, sculpted by Hermon Atkins MacNeil and cast by Bureau Brothers Foundry in Los Angeles, features two Native Americans standing on a block of rough-hewn native stone. Facing eastward, they look down upon the route that ox teams trudged bringing settlers to this part of the country. The older of the two is said to represent Chief Multnomah of the Multnomah people. At some point, the oak branch held by the younger figure was broken off. The sculptor made a <a href="http://www.poppenhuseninstitute.org/virtual/s/sculp.html" target="_blank">copy</a> of this statue for his neighborhood art and cultural center in College Point, NY.
 
A bronze statue of Sacajawea holding her son Jean-Baptiste is located near the Chiming Fountain. In commemoration of the heroic Shoshone Indian woman who helped lead the Lewis and Clark explorers through the mountains of the west, the statue was unveiled on July 7, 1905 at the Lewis and Clark Centennial. Among those present at the event were Susan B. Anthony, Abigail Scott Duniway, and Eva Emery Dye. The project was promoted and paid for by subscriptions solicited nationwide by a group of Portland women headed by Mrs. Sarah Evans. The committee commissioned Alice Cooper of Denver, at that time an understudy of Lorado Taft, to sculpt the statue. It was cast in New York and required 14 tons of copper which came from the Sweden mine, just below Mt St Helens. The copper was donated by Dr. Henry Waldo Coe of Portland. In April 1906, the statue was placed in its current location in Washington Park. Its inscription reads, "Erected by the women of the United States in memory of the only woman in the Lewis & Clark expedition, and in honor of the pioneer mother of Oregon."
 
Located near the corner of Washington Way & Wright, the Oregon Holocaust Memorial was dedicated on August 29, 2004. The memorial features a stone bench adorned with wrought-iron gating, screened from the street by rhododendron bushes. The bench sits behind a circular, cobblestoned area - simulating a town square. During the Holocaust, many Jewish families were gathered in town squares before being loaded onto trains and taken to concentration camps. The square contains scattered bronzes of shoes, glasses, a suitcase, and other items to represent everyday objects that were left behind. A European-style, cobblestone walkway with inlaid granite bars, simulating railroad tracks, leads to a wall of history panels - giant, stone placards that offer a brief history of the Holocaust and quotes from Holocaust survivors. At the end of the wall is the soil vault panel. Buried below the panel are interred soil and ash from six killing-center camps of the Holocaust - Chelmno, Treblinka, Sobibor, Belzec, Majdanek, and Auschwitz-Birkenau. The back of the wall is engraved with the names of people who died in the camps, followed by the names of their surviving relatives in Oregon and SW Washington. <a href="http://ohrconline.org/" target="_blank">More information</a> on the Holocaust Memorial.","Washington Park is one of the oldest parks in Portland. The city purchased the original 40.78 acres in 1871 from Amos N. King for the then high price of $32,624. Many people questioned the purchase given that the site was thick with brush and timber, and cougar roamed the hills.
 
City Park, as Washington Park was originally known until 1909, was developed slowly. In June 1885, the city hired Charles M. Myers as its first park keeper. A native of Germany and a seaman, Myers had no formal training but enthusiastically began to develop the park by using his memories of European parks as a guide. By 1900, the park had developed from a wilderness to a place of drives, walkways, formal plantings, lawns, clipped hedges, and ornamental flower displays. In 1903, John C. Olmsted toured Portland and recommended changes of lasting usefulness to the park: he advised changing the name from City Park to one of more distinction, moving the main entrance to Park Place, separating vehicular traffic from foot traffic, and restoring some of the formally planted areas to their natural beauty with native shrubs and ground cover.
 
The last major land addition to Washington Park was made in 1922 when the entire 160-acre County Poor Farm was transferred to the Park Bureau. The southern half of the property was developed into the 9-hole West Hills Golf Course. The remainder was designated as a municipal arboretum in 1928.
 
Washington Park was also the site of Portland's first zoo, which Dr. Richard B. Knight began as an animal attraction in the mid-1880s. Dr. Knight was an English-born seaman who became a pharmacist upon moving to Portland. He purchased two bears (a grizzly named Grace and a brown bear named Brownie) along with other animals from his seafaring friends and exhibited them on a vacant lot next to his downtown pharmacy. By 1887, the popular collection had outgrown its quarters, so Dr. Knight donated the animals to the city for a zoo. The animals were moved to the area near the current reservoirs. The collection grew rapidly. By 1894 there were about 300 specimens, mostly North American species plus some monkeys, a kangaroo, and some foreign birds. The city park keeper, Charles Myers, became the zookeeper as well. He constructed the bear pit, which is believed to have been the first sunken, barless cage anywhere in the world. In 1925, the zoo moved to a higher location, the present site of the Japanese Garden. The zoo opened at its present location in 1959 and in the 1960s its management was transferred to Metro.
 
The Rotary Club of Portland spearheaded a $2 million fund-raising effort that culminated in the 1995 construction of the Rose Garden Children's Park, a popular, accessible play area for children of all ages.
<p>","","Washington Park"
"844","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Water & Gibbs Community Garden"
"846","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Wellington Park"
"849","","","","","West Portland Park Natural Area"
"850","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","","","West Powellhurst Park"
"852","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>","","Westmoreland Park began as a part of a residential subdivision that was subtracted from the Ladd Estate's Crystal Spring Stock Farm in 1909. By the 1930s, the site east of the subdivision had been converted from a wetland to serve time as a dairy, brickyard, and airstrip known as Broom Field. However, as development increased, residents requested that these empty fields be turned into a city park.
 
In 1935, the City Planning Commission recommended development of recreational amenities for the nearby residents and "the improved appearance and traffic safety of McLoughlin Boulevard as a major traffic freeway entrance to the city." In January 1936, the City of Portland purchased the 45-acre parcel called Fairways Addition from Oregon Iron & Steel Co., a business owned by the Ladd Estate Co.
The Commission proposed a plan, prepared by architect Francis B. Jacobberger, for the park. The City of Portland and the Federal government began to develop the vision of Jacobberger’s plan as a ‘make work’ proposal under the Works Progress Administration (WPA). The WPA projects resulted in a casting pond, a model yacht lagoon (known as the Duck Pond), a fly caster’s club house, bridges, a water supply for the casting pond supplied from Eastmoreland Golf Course, and grading of the athletic fields. In August 1936, the hand-excavated, 410' x 350' casting pond served as the site for the 28th International Casting competition. Other amenities in the Jacoberger Plan included archery and croquet fields; badminton, volleyball, tennis, handball, and basketball courts; horseshoe pits; night illumination of the casting pond; and dressing room buildings. However, additional park projects remained idle for several years due to lack of funding.
 
In 1938, Nick Sckavone, a southeast Portland druggist who devoted a good part of his life to the development of both amateur and professional baseball in the city, began a successful campaign to advocate for a ballfield for adult baseball. In 1939, $197,299 was allocated by the City; $42,000 was used to build the baseball field. The very first baseball season got underway in 1940 and since that time, Westmoreland Baseball Park has been the launching ground for several professional careers and championship teams. In 1942, the City added a wooden stadium. The field needed lights, but city funds were not available. Not deterred, Sckavone and the Portland Amatuer Baseball Association (PABA), which he founded, organized a benefit baseball game at the old Vaughn Street Park, after which Sckavone handed the City a check for $2,000. Impressed by this show of support, the City budgeted the additional $11,000 and new lights were installed in 1945. In 1955, the facility was renamed Sckavone Field in honor of the man who was so instrumental in its creation. When Portland's citizens passed the Parks Improvement Levy in 1989, $375,000 was earmarked to rebuild Sckavone Stadium. The new structure was dedicated June 23, 1992.
 
In 1945, lawn bowling facilities were constructed; the grass playing surface is also used croquet and the gravel playing surface is used for petanque. A restroom/picnic shelter, originally called the Field House, was built in 1949, and a children’s wading pool in 1952. <i>Uroboros</i>, a sculpture by Charles Kibby, was installed in 1979.
 
During the 1940s the first incidents of Crystal Springs overflowing its banks were documented. In 1974 it was reported that the concrete walls which channelized Crystal Springs Creek were failing. Also, in the 1970s, complaints were registered about ducks and geese creating menacing situations, dogs running loose, and parking problems. During the 1980s, swimming in the casting pond and Crystal Springs became a concern for local residents and PP&R staff because of water quality and safety issues. From 1996 to 1998, periodic flooding in the park inundated picnic areas, playgrounds, and paths. When the waters finally receded, leaving behind damaged stream edges and dying trees, questions about the future of the creek and park arose.
 
In order to address these issues, a master planning process for the park, with community input, began in 2002; a final plan was approved in 2003. As funding becomes available, future improvements to the park will be made according to the master plan.","","Westmoreland Park"
"856","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
<b>Access</b>
The best access to the park is from the entrance at 7040 NE 47 Ave, a ¼ mile north of Columbia Blvd. TriMet bus #75 makes a stop at the corner of NE 47 & Columbia and visitors can walk north from there to the park entrance. Bike racks are located inside the entrance near the west pond. Vehicles should be parked outside the entrance as the vehicle gate may close without warning. A smaller adjoining pedestrian gate is always open during park hours.
 
<b>Features</b>
Natural area with ½ mile walking trail, ecoroof-covered gazebo, observation dock, canoe launch into Whitaker Slough, wildflower meadow, and Lewis & Clark Garden.
 
<b>Park Rules</b>
- No dogs allowed
- No fishing or paddling on ponds
- Remove your own garbage
- Please stay on designated trails (the east pond is a wildlife protection area with no public entry)
 
<b>Organized Groups</b>
Call 503-823-3601 to reserve space.","This nature park is home to two ponds, a ½ mile loop trail, an ecoroof-covered gazebo, and a canoe launch into Whitaker Slough. The two ponds are surrounded by a black cottonwood forest which has been enhanced over the past 15 years with thousands of native plants. A wildflower meadow near the entrance on NE 47 Ave supports local pollinators in summertime, and the Lewis & Clark Garden near the gazebo highlights plant communities from the western United States.
 
A sloping ramp leads down to an observation dock on the west pond, from which visitors can see fish, frogs, and water bugs. A second dock into Whitaker Slough is located on the north side of the park, and offers excellent access for canoes and kayaks. Paddlers can launch from the park and travel west on Whitaker Slough to connect to the main stem of the 19-mile Columbia Slough. Note that no fishing or paddling is allowed in either of the ponds.
 
The park is frequented by many animals, including downy woodpeckers, rabbits, beavers, garter snakes, osprey, dragonflies, otters, and wood ducks. In February, park visitors may spot fuzzy grey owlets from the great horned owl’s nest in a bare cottonwood tree. And in May, bird enthusiasts can enjoy the feisty territorial spats between individual rufous hummingbirds as they establish who has rights to which red-flowering currant bush.
 
PP&R <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38295">Environmental Education</a>, the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/education" target="_blank">Bureau of Environmental Services</a>, and the <a href="http://www.columbiaslough.org" target="_blank">Columbia Slough Watershed Council</a> provide youth and adult education programs.
 
The nature park is maintained by PP&R staff with the help of volunteers from the Columbia Slough Watershed Council.","The park and its facilities are the result of many collaborative partnerships involving the City of Portland, Metro, the Columbia Slough Watershed Council, and many community members. Portions of the park were used as a junkyard before they were acquired, and over 2,000 tires were removed in the process of restoring the area to a nature park. PP&R manages the park, and the Columbia Slough Watershed Council has offices onsite.","","Whitaker Ponds Nature Park"
"857","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The property was owned for many years by the Van Alstyne family. In the late 1970s, a plant nursery was established and operated for 20 years until the site was acquired by the city of Portland in 1998.
 
A master plan for the park was completed in August 2000 and construction began in September 2003. Several community partners contributed toward the park's development, including Nike, Oregon State Parks & Recreation, Portland Parks & Recreation, Portland Office of Transportation, and the Bureau of Maintenance. The community participated in a dedication ceremony during Neighbor’s Night Out on August 3, 2004.","","Wilkes Park"
"861","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm. Closed to vehicles at 10:00pm.
 
<b>Metered Parking Hours</b>
 
<i>Summer (Memorial Day through Labor Day)</i>
Daily: 9:00 AM- 5:00 PM
 
<i>Non-Summer</i>
Mon-Fri: 9:00 AM-3:00 PM
Weekends: 9:00 AM-5:00 PM
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<a href="http://www.southportlandna.org/southportlandriverbank/" target="_blank">South Portland Riverbank Project</a>","","","","Willamette Park"
"862","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Wilshire Park"
"863","Closed for the season.
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$5.00 - age 18 & up
$3.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Two outdoor pools: 6-lane lap pool with diving board and family leisure pool with current channel, vortex, tot slide, water slide, and zero-depth water play structure.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5038233680","Wilson Pool"
"864","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","In June 2008, in collaboration with the Portland Trail Blazers and Fred Meyer, the Woodlawn Children's Garden Program was launched. An industrious group of volunteers from Fred Meyer and the Blazers worked with neighborhood children to clean up the garden area, completing several weeks of work in a matter of hours. A ceremonial planting of vegetables by mascots Blaze the Trail Cat and Fred Bear commemorated the new partnership.","In August 2007 AVEENO® and Organic Gardening installed a Thai Jar rainwater-harvesting cistern, the first of its kind in the northwest United States, at the garden. In addition to the cistern, the project included a new covered arbor that serves as a gathering and teaching space, flower boxes around the tool shed, roses for the perennial beds, and a new picnic table.","5038231612","Woodlawn Community Garden"
"865","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","The seating wall near the playground was crafted by Portland artist Anne Storrs in 2000. The design of the <i>Buckeye Bench</i> was inspired by the Sweet buckeye tree that grows in the park. The cast forms resemble three views of the tree's leaves - a complete leaf, a close-up, and an even closer view of the leaves' ends.","","Woodlawn Park"
"866","About 98% of the landscape is native including oaks, Douglas fir, cedar, willow, red and blue elderberry, Oregon grape, trillium, thimbleberry, and others. This steeply sloped site is part of the Fanno Watershed, containing the headwaters of the two forks of Woods Creek. Although most of the park was logged about one hundred years ago, there are still some historic trees. It offers a natural setting that attracts wildlife in the quiet woods, along the creek, and in the meadow.","","Woods Memorial Natural Area was a gift to Multnomah County from the Southwest Hills Kiwanis Club on December 15, 1950. The deed stipulated that the "site was to be . . . used for park and playground purposes only. . . ." Multnomah County transferred ownership of the site to the city of Portland in 1988.","","Woods Memorial Natural Area"
"867","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Woodstock-Community-Center/158136007539464?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","The building is an historic firehouse built in 1928. PP&R assumed ownership of the firehouse in 1958 and converted it into a community center. When the center was threatened with closure in 2003 as a result of City budget shortfalls, a group of dedicated community volunteers formed the Friends of the Woodstock Community Center (FWCC) to raise funds, and to recruit and coordinate volunteers who contribute thousands of hours each year helping with landscape maintenance, building upkeep, classes, and community events.","5038233633","Woodstock Community Center"
"868","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a sports field or picnic area, call 503-823-2525. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=38301" target="_blank">Picnic Site Maps & Info</a>
 
<b>Wading Pool Update</b>
PP&R has closed its wading pools for health and safety reasons, as required by new State of Oregon regulations. In 2002, an inventory and assessment of wading pools was completed. Based on those recommendations, as well as input from maintenance and planning staff, PP&R has identified 17 wading pools for replacement and 7 for elimination. Please read the <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?a=283894&c=38277"target="_blank">FAQ</a> for more information.","","","","Woodstock Park"
"884","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Portsmouth Community Garden"
"885","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Patton Community Garden"
"890","","","This property was given to the city by Nina B. Adams. She had originally purchased the land in order to build her home on it, but later changed her mind and decided that the best use of the property was as a public park. One small portion of the land held a house which was rented out by Mrs. Adams, something the city continued to do. When the city received this land, Mrs. Adams' attorneys alleged that they were breaching the contract by not using all of the given acreage for public purposes. The issue was resolved and now we have a lovely area in which to explore our environment's natural beauty.","","Adams Property"
"892","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Indoor, 20-yard swimming pool, heated to 85 degrees.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5038233668","Buckman Pool"
"894","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm
 
Part of Forest Park","","This area, now part of Forest Park, was also known as O.M. Clark Park. It was donated by the Clark and Wilson Lumber Company because O.M. Clark wished to preserve a sample of the western Oregon timber as a park.","","Clark & Wilson Park"
"897","Park hours: 5:00am-10:00pm
 
Part of Forest Park","","Frederick Van Voorhies Holman was a prominent lawyer in Portland during the 1890s. He was also president of the Oregon Historical Society. His great hobby was growing and exhibiting roses and he organized the Portland Rose Society in 1902.
 
Part of the Holman property had been flushed down to Guild's Lake by Lafe Fence's flume in 1909. After Fence was brought to task, Holman had a plaster of paris scale model made of the property to estimate how much it would cost to return the property to its original contours in order to develop it. Discouraged by the City from taking such a great risk, he offered the property as a park if the property between it and Macleay Park were acquired. The property was donated to the city by his siblings George F. and Mary Holman on August 16, 1939, and F.V. Holman's wish was fulfilled when Forest Park was dedicated nine years later.","","Holman Park"
"900","","","","","Jefferson Street Property"
"901","","","","",""
"906","","","","","Mocks Crest Property"
"907","","","","",""
"916","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Beginning with the demolition of Harbor Drive, a six-lane roadway that separated the river from downtown, Tom McCall Waterfront Park has been developed in multiple phases over the past 25 years. Portland's 25-year dream of reclaiming its waterfront was realized with the completion of South Waterfront Park which runs 1,000 feet along the bank of the Willamette River. Unique along the downtown riverfront, South Waterfront Park provides direct public access to the river throughout the year.
 
Developed primarily to anchor the commercial and residential property built in the mid-1990s, the park also served to stem any further erosion of the river bank that occurred during the 1996 winter flood. Once the site of a lumber mill and the City's steam plant, the park was designed by the landscape architectural firm of Walker Macy. The esplanade meanders the full length of the riverbank, mirroring the course of the river. Historically the street grid of Portland extended directly to the river's edge to facilitate access and commerce. Today the city's block grid extends through South Waterfront Park to the water's edge via walkways leading to overlooks with views of the river, the city, Mt Hood, and Mt St Helens. The form of the river is carried up into the park via the flowing forms of the site grading and planting, as well as a pair of boulder-lined pathways sculpted into the riverbank leading to a natural silty beach that is exposed at the base of these pathways during periods of low water.
 
The basalt, concrete, and steel sculpture by Mathieu Gregoire, <I>River Shift</I>, reflects the historical progression of the riverbank with his use of local basalt and remnants of the concrete piers and reinforcements excavated from the old waterfront site. As the basalt pieces progress from berm to river, they tip over, so that the concrete below becomes exposed and the basalt becomes submerged and eventually disappears.
The concrete is cut in various places to expose the river rock aggregate inside as well as the old embedded wood piers, and some of the heavy steel reinforcement emerges like roots.","","South Waterfront Park"
"917","","","","","Stark Street Island"
"921","","","","","Willamette Moorage"
"925","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Clatsop Butte Park"
"926","","","This property, originally owned by Charles and Thelma Norris, is located in the heart of Terwilliger Parkway, a scenic drive originally conceived by John C. Olmsted and presented as part of the 1903 Olmsted Plan to the Portland Parks Board. A longtime Portland resident and school teacher, Thelma Norris was a charter member of the American Rhododendron Society. She and her husband planted dozens of rhododendrons on the property. When she died in 1992, she bequeathed the property to Portland Parks & Recreation.","","Norris Property"
"1010","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","One day King neighborhood resident Joe Martin got tired of looking at the overgrown vacant lot near his home. The retired Union Pacific Railroad worker went down to Goodwill, bought an old lawn mower, and began cutting down the tall weeds. Neighbors joined him in cleaning out garbage and planting flowers. Soon they began talking about turning the lot into a park.
 
The timing was fortunate. The Trust for Public Land had recently obtained funding from the Lila Wallace Reader's Digest Fund to help create parks in Portland and other cities. PP&R hosted several community meetings inviting residents to help design the park. The neighbors persuaded the city to expand the plans to include two lots. The city paid off the back taxes and took possession of the lots. The park was completed in November 2001; the neighbors named it Two Plum Park after the two plum trees that grew there.","","Two Plum Park"
"1016","For museum hours and information about classes, programs, rentals, and membership, visit the Portland Children's Museum website at <a href="http://www.PortlandChildrensMuseum.org" target="_blank">www.portlandcm.org</a>.
 
The 26-foot-tall <I>Thinga-Ma-Greeter</I>, an interactive, kinetic tower designed by eight designers from Nike, serves as a playful way to welcome visitors and stimulate the imaginations of arriving children as they discover that with a turn of any of the three wheels they can move an element of the tower far above them. It was officially unveiled on March 11, 2003.","","","5032236500","Portland Children's Museum"
"1055","","","","","Gentemann Property"
"1106","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Indoor, 25-yard swimming pool, heated to 86 degrees. Water depths range from 1.5 feet to 8 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5038233669","Columbia Pool"
"1107","Closed for the season.
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Outdoor, 25-yard shallow pool and 25-yard deep pool with drop slide and a kiddie slide, heated to 84 degrees. Water depths range from 2 feet to 8 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5038233672","Creston Pool"
"1109","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","East Holladay Park"
"1110","To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","Built in 1948, the stadium was named in honor of Erv Lind on July 16, 1965, a year after his death. A well-known local florist, he was also the coach and manager of Portland's best known women's softball team, the Erv Lind Florists, for 28 years, leading it to two ASA national titles in 1944 and 1964. An annual award is named after Lind and is given each year to the Outstanding Defensive Player in the ASA Women’s Major Fast Pitch National Championship. He was elected to the Northwest Region Hall of Fame in 1984.","","Normandale Park - Erv Lind Stadium"
"1111","To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","In 1938, Nick Sckavone, a southeast Portland druggist who devoted a good part of his life to the development of both amateur and professional baseball in the city, began a successful campaign to convince the Park Bureau that the new park should include a field for adult baseball. In 1939, $197,299 was allocated by the City to transform the area into a park; $42,000 was used to build the baseball field. The very first baseball season got underway in 1940 and since that time, Westmoreland Baseball Park has been the launching ground for several professional careers and championship teams. In 1943, the City added a wooden stadium. The field needed lights, but city funds were not available. Not deterred, Sckavone and the Portland Amatuer Baseball Association (PABA), which he founded, organized a benefit baseball game at the old Vaughn Street Park, after which Sckavone handed the City a check for $2,000. Impressed by this show of support, the City budgeted the additional $11,000 and new lights were installed in 1944. In 1955, the facility was renamed Sckavone Field in honor of the man who was so instrumental in its creation. When Portland's citizens passed the Parks Improvement Levy in 1989, $375,000 was earmarked to rebuild Sckavone Stadium. The new structure was dedicated June 23, 1992.","","Sckavone Stadium - Westmoreland Park"
"1112","Closed for the season.
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Outdoor, 25-yard shallow pool with kiddie slide and 25-yard deep pool, heated to 84 degrees. Water depths range from 2 feet to 8 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5038233674","Grant Pool"
"1113","Garden hours: 7:30am-9:00pm
 
<i>Daily Tours</i>
From June 1 through September 21, tours of the rose garden are led by trained volunteers at 1:00 PM seven days a week; an additional tour is available at 11:30 AM on Tuesday. These tours are limited to 10 people. Meet at the Rose Garden Store. Donations gladly accepted.
 
<i>Tour Groups</i>
Guided tours for groups of 11 or more are available during the year for a nominal fee per person. Call 503-823-3664 to make arrangements.
Visit the Rose Garden Store website at <a href="http://www.rosegardenstore.org" target="_blank">www.rosegardenstore.org</a>.","Founded in 1889, the Portland Rose Society is a non-profit organization offering educational programs on rose culture and encouraging the use of roses in the landscape. The Portland Rose Society plays an important and ongoing role in maintaining the high standards of Portland's public rose gardens. For information on Rose Society programs or membership, write or call Portland Rose Society, PO Box 515, Portland, 97207, voice mail: 503-777-4311.
 
Volunteer opportunities are available in both garden and non-garden work. Garden tasks include deadheading, planting, pruning, sign painting, and garden improvement projects. Non-garden tasks include strategic planning, fundraising, updating educational materials, leading garden tours, maintaining inventory records, and coordinating volunteer efforts. Contact the Rose Garden, 503-823-3636, or Volunteer Services, 503-823-5121.
 
<b>Volunteer Training</b>
Learn how to properly deadhead roses. Attend any session and be qualified to deadhead at Washington Park, Peninsula Park, and Pittock Mansion.
 
<i>Washington Park International Rose Test Garden</i>
May 17, 24 & 31 at 9:00 AM - meet at kiosk (second hour of training includes tour guide instructions)
 
<i>Peninsula Park Rose Garden</i>
June 1 & 3 at 9:00 AM - meet at fountain","Portland has long had a love affair with roses. In 1888, Georgiana Burton Pittock, wife of publisher Henry Pittock, invited her friends and neighbors to exhibit their roses in a tent set up in her garden; thus the Portland Rose Society was established. The rose <i>Mme. Caroline Testout</i> was introduced by Pernet-Ducher in 1890, and Portlanders began to plant it on their curbs. By 1905 Portland had 200 miles of rose-bordered streets which helped attract visitors to the Lewis and Clark Centennial celebration. Portland came to be known as the 'City of Roses.'
 
In 1915 Jesse A. Currey, rose hobbyist and Sunday editor of the <i>Oregon Journal</i>, convinced city officials to institute a rose test garden to serve as a safe haven during World War I for hybrid roses grown in Europe. Rose lovers feared that these unique plants would be destroyed in the bombings. The Park Bureau approved the idea in 1917 and by early 1918, hybridists from England began to send roses. In 1921 Florence Holmes Gerke, the landscape architect for the city of Portland, was charged with designing the International Rose Test Garden and the amphitheatre. The garden was dedicated in June 1924. Currey was appointed as the garden's first rose curator and served in that capacity until his death in 1927.
 
Part of the original design, the <b>Royal Rosarian Garden</b> is home to the namesake roses of all past Prime Ministers of the Royal Rosarians, a civic group which serves as the official greeters and goodwill ambassadors for the City of Portland. Founded in 1912, the Order of Royal Rosarians modeled their mythical 'Realm of Rosaria' after the government of England’s King Henry VII, whose rise to the throne in 1485 ended the War of the Roses. Members are 'knighted' into the organization under their chosen variety of rose, which is then their 'namesake' rose. The garden also features a stone bench honoring Jesse Currey.
 
In 1940 the International Rose Test Garden became an official testing site for the All-America Rose Selection (AARS), a Chicago-based non-profit association of rose growers dedicated to the introduction and promotion of exceptional roses. Since 1938 the AARS seal of approval has graced new rose varieties that have performed the best in the test gardens located throughout the country and representing all climate zones. Four plants of each entry are evaluated for two years on 14 different characteristics consumers desire in a garden plant including plant habit, vigor, disease resistance, color, flower production, form, foliage, and fragrance. About 200 rose cultivars are under test each year in 24 rose test gardens nationwide.
 
In 1945, the <b>Shakespeare Garden</b>, located at Crystal Springs Lake in southeast Portland, was moved to Washington Park to allow for expansion of Eastmoreland Golf Course. Designed by Glenn Stanton and Florence Gerke, it was originally intended to include only herbs, trees, and flowers mentioned in William Shakespeare's plays. The garden continues to honor the Bard with roses named after characters in his plays. The focal point of the garden is the Shakespeare Memorial, a brick wall with a plaque featuring Shakespeare’s image and his quote, "Of all flowers methinks a rose is best." Donated by the LaBarre Shakespeare Club, it was dedicated on April 23, 1946 - the 382nd anniversary of Shakespeare's birth. In 1957 the club added a sundial to the garden.
 
In 1967, rose curator Rudolph Kalmbach wanted to establish a formal garden featuring Gold Award roses. (In 1919 the City of Portland issued its first annual Gold Award for the best new rose variety.) With the support of the Portland Rose Society, Wallace Kay Huntington was selected to design the garden which was dedicated in June 1970. In 1991, the Portland Rose Society donated the pavilion which overlooks these award-winning roses.
 
Established in 1975, the <b>Miniature Rose Garden</b> is one of only six testing grounds for the American Rose Society (ARS) miniature rose test program. The national annual winners from both ARS and AARS associations are displayed in the middle of the garden along the center aisle.
 
Set in a sunken section on the upper level of the garden, the Frank Edwin Beach Memorial Fountain was dedicated in June 1975. The stainless steel sculpture, titled <i>Water Sculpture</i>, was designed and built by Oregon artist Lee Kelly. The fountain was a gift from the Beach family to honor their father, Frank Edwin Beach (1853-1934), the man who is said to have christened Portland the 'City of Roses.'
 
<b>Awards</b>
The award called <I>Portland’s Best Rose</I> was established in 1996. Rose experts from around the world attend a one-day judging in June and select the best rose that day from thousands of submissions. Portland remains the only North American city to issue such an award.
 
Featuring over 8,000 rose bushes representing more than 600 varieties, the International Rose Test Garden received <i>The Garden of Excellence Award</i> from the World Federation of Rose Societies in 2006.
<p>","","International Rose Test Garden - Washington Park"
"1114","","<b><I>Introduction to Dance for Children</I></b>
The Laurelhurst Dance program affords a variety of choices to introduce dance to children starting from age 1 & up. For the youngest ages, we have parent & child classes where adult involvement is essential to the class. The discovery of music, rhythm, and movement in a shared experience enhances the bond between parent and child. Toddlers can work on their balance and coordination with <I>Tumble, Twirl, Turn & Twist</I> or explore music and fantasy with <I>Dancing Prince and Princesses</I> or <i>Music, Marching & Make-Believe</i>.
 
Children ages 3-4 years benefit from an introduction to the dance curriculum with classes like <i>Terrific Twirling Threes & Fours</i> combines the basic concepts of ballet and jazz in an exploration of rhythm and body awareness.
 
<i>Dance - Discover the Magic</i>, 4-6 years, or <i>Ballet, Jazz & Tap Fundamentals</i>, 3-5 years, also offers the chance to explore several forms of movement such as tap, ballet, jazz, and hip hop. These classes ready each child for other areas of learning such as academics and sports.
 
At age 4, a child may repeat these classes as new concepts and materials will continue to be introduced. Also, <I>Pre-Ballet - Where Dreams Begin</I> for ages 4-5, <I>Tap Dance - Tiny Tappers</I> or <I>Dance - Tiny Hip Hoppers</I> for ages 4-6, may be added at this point. We also offer classes in these dance forms for children ages 6-9 who want to continue training as well as older beginning dancers. For those wanting to explore more than one type of activity, we offer <i>Ballet & Tap</i>, 6-10 years.
 
Each class and level explores new material and continues with exercises to establish the strengths and skills evident in posture, alignment, coordination, and initiative. At age 8, children are eligible to join the studio's Youth Ballet Training Program with Jojo Hills or Mara Cogswell.
 
<b><I>Ballet Classes</I></b>
Ballet is a lifelong, total body experience with the benefits of increased flexibility stamina, self-confidence, and stress reduction. We have both children and adult classes for all ages and abilities. Children can start with pre-ballet classes, move on to our Youth Ballet Training Program and continue or begin as adults. Classes are taught on a professional grade, Marley-covered, wood-sprung floor, in a room with mirrors. A viewing gallery is available for observing classes. Payment plans are available. Enrollment is accepted throughout the term; fees will be prorated.
 
<b><I>Youth Ballet Training Program</I></b>
This program is a year-round dance training opportunity emphasizing technique and increased endurance in a creative and supportive environment. It is open to all interested students with progressive classes for the beginning dancer through advanced and performing levels. The program is excellent for expanding self-discipline and confidence along with interest, knowledge, and interpretive skills in music. Dance training builds strength, flexibility, and coordination while increasing concentration and focus. Most students will enroll in the same class level for three terms before fully mastering the technique and skills necessary for advancement. Students who have previous ballet experience not at Laurelhurst Dance Studio should enroll in <I>Ballet Evaluation</I> to determine proper placement. Students new to ballet should enroll in <I>Ballet - Basics</I>.
 
<b><I>Dance & Fitness for Adults</I></b>
We offer adult classes in Ballet from beginning to master classes, as well as Ballroom Dance and Pilates. Many of these courses allow drop-ins if there is space. Call 503-823-4101 to check on availability.","In 1911, as part of an Olmsted design, the Laurelhurst Annex block was developed into a ‘play park’ along SE 37 Ave between SE Oak & Stark. The boys were to play on the south side, the girls on the north side. Circa 1914, a 'comfort station' with a working fireplace was built next to the playground. Children could come in out of the rain to play ping-pong or attend Scout meetings. This charming Tudor theatre style building, now known as Laurelhurst Studio, has a unique chimney that splits in two on the balcony level with a spot to stand in the middle. In this toasty area, children could look out the windows and see the park entrance while waiting for their parents to arrive. Although the fireplace is no longer in use, the picturesque balcony is still available for observing classes.","5038234101","Laurelhurst Dance Studio"
"1117","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/MattDishmanCommunityCenter" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18-59
$3.50 - age 60 & up
$3.50 - age 14-17
$2.50 - age 3-13
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Indoor, 25-yard, L-shaped pool with a one-meter diving board, heated to 84 degrees, and whirlpool spa heated to 102 degrees. Water depths range from 2 to 12 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","This community center is the site of the former Eliot Grade School. After the school was relocated, PP&R took it over in 1950 and remodeled the building, naming it the Knott Street Community Center. In the late 1960s, the local community lobbied to name the center after Matt Dishman, the first African-American Multnomah County sheriff and police officer in the city of Portland.
 
Installed on the lawn in front of the center, is a pavilion sculpted by Jon Gierlich in 1996, aptly titled <i>Angle of Repose</i>.","5038233673","Matt Dishman Community Center & Pool"
"1119","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Montavilla-Community-Center/51236826859?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
Pool phone: 503-823-3675
Closed for the season.
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Outdoor, 25-yard shallow pool and 25-yard deep pool, heated to 84 degrees. Water depths range from 2 feet to 8 feet. Has a drop slide and a kiddie slide.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","This center was at its busy location long before all of the traffic. One of the original four community centers built by the city in the 1920s, at that time the building consisted of just the current gymnasium with an adjacent outdoor pool. The gym usually housed a variety of recreational activities, but during the summer months when the pool was in use, two floor-to-ceiling wood walls were put into place. These boards divided the gym into a boys' dressing room and a girls' dressing room, with a center walkway between them. Legend has it that boys would try to line up the knotholes in the wooden walls - never successfully.
 
In 1992, the first phase of renovations at Montavilla was completed. The aquatics facilities were relocated, which provided permanent preschool and gymnastics rooms. Previously, these rooms doubled as dressing rooms during the busy summer season. In 1998, the multi-purpose room was upgraded and another classroom was added. New pieces of equipment and swings were placed in the playground and the parking lot was doubled.","5038234101","Montavilla Community Center & Pool"
"1120","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/MtScottCommunityCenter?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=52647">Party Packages</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.50 - age18-59
$3.75 - age 60 & up
$3.75 - age 13-17
$3.25 - age 3-12
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Indoor, 25-yard, 6-lane lap pool, heated to 84 degrees. Leisure pool with slide, current channel, vortex, and interactive play features, heated to 88 degrees. Whirlpool spa heated to 102 degrees. Water depths range from zero depth entry to 9 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
 
<b>Our Partners</b>
<a href="http://www.neighborhoodlink.com/portland/msana/" target="_blank">Mt Scott-Arleta Neighborhood Association</a>","Mt Scott Community Center started off in the mid-1920s as a wooden bathhouse and outdoor swimming pool. Additions in 1948 and 1953, including a roller rink, transformed the facility into a year-round community center. The latest renovation, completed in June 2000, included an indoor aquatic center.","5038233183","Mt Scott Community Center & Pool"
"1123","Includes 7 softball fields, 9 soccer fields (one with artificial turf), and a concessions building.
 
No dogs, leashed or unleashed, are allowed in the sports complex..","","The complex is named after William V. Owens, a 30-year veteran of Portland Parks & Recreation who developed and managed the softball program. He retired in 1986 after serving six years as Park Superintendent.","5038231656","Delta Park - Owens Sports Complex"
"1124","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/PeninsulaParkCC?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a
 
<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","<b>Peninsula Pool Info</b>
Closed for the season.
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
General Admission Fees
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Outdoor, 33-yard, oval-shaped swimming pool, heated to 84 degrees. Water depths range from 2 feet to 8 feet.
 
In 1998, two ceramic tile murals created by artist George Johanson were installed on the south wall overlooking the pool deck. These colorful murals depict people enjoying the water at the beach and at a pool.","Built in 1913, this Italian-villa style facility was the first community center in the Portland park system. Its original floor plan was perfectly symmetrical, consisting of two pools and two gyms - one for men, the other for women. Such separate-but-equal social attitudes were also reflected in the entryway murals: young men featured in the area leading to the men's side, and young women on the women's side!
 
The Peninsula Pool was built in order to fill the need created by the closure of the bath houses that had been in use on the Willamette River. These structures were closed due to increasing pollution in the Willamette. As popular as the pool is with people, it also has a history of being enjoyed by Humboldt penguins. In 1957, when the penguins were scheduled to make their debut at the Washington Park Zoo, the zoo's penguin facilities were not yet finished, so the Peninsula Park Pool was used as a holding area until their own space was ready.","5038233620","Peninsula Park Community Center & Pool"
"1126","Closed for the season.
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Outdoor, 25-yard shallow pool with kiddie slide and 25-yard deep pool, heated to 84 degrees. Water depths range from 2 feet to 8 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5038233678","Pier Pool"
"1127","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Pittock-Mansion/153888081303013?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
For hours of operation, admission fees, and other information, visit the Pittock Mansion website at <a href="http://www.pittockmansion.org" target="_blank">www.pittockmansion.org</a>.","","Once the private home of the Portland pioneer Pittock family, this 22-room house was designed by architect Edward Foulkes and completed in 1914. The mansion sits 1,000 feet above sea level on 46 acres and commands a view of five mountains in the Cascade Range. It is an outstanding architectural achievement with its eclectic design of circular rooms, combining fine plasterwork, cut and polished marbles, cast bronze, and superbly crafted hardwoods and paneling. Its progressive features included a central vacuum system, intercoms, and indirect lighting hidden in alcoves above the walls. The house is completely furnished with antique furniture and objets d'art, including family artifacts, appropriate to its 17th, 18th, and 19th century French and English designs.
 
Henry Louis Pittock was a vigorous outdoorsman, and was a member of the first party to climb Mt Hood. He was a consummate businessman, and took ownership of the weekly Oregonian in 1860, the same year he married 15-year-old Georgiana Martin Burton of Missouri, only seven years after arriving on the wagon train from Pennsylvania. He went on to build an empire incorporating real estate, banking, railroads, steamboats, sheep ranching, silver mining, and a pulp and paper industry.
 
Georgiana loved gardening and kept a terraced flower garden filled with many kinds of flowers. She started the tradition of Portland's annual Rose Festival. In the community, she dedicated herself to the lives of woman and children. She helped found the Ladies Relief Society in 1867 and played a key role in building the Martha Washington home for single working women.
 
The couple lived there with their family from 1914 until the death of Georgiana in 1918 and Henry in 1919. The house remained as a family residence until 1958. Six years later, the City of Portland purchased the estate for $225,000. It was opened to the public one year later and has remained a community landmark ever since.","5038233624","Pittock Mansion"
"1128","Park hours: 5:00am-9:00pm","","","","Pittock Mansion Acres"
"1130","Closed for the season.
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$4.00 - age 18 & up
$2.50 - age 3-17
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Outdoor, oval-shaped swimming pool, heated to 84 degrees, with a drop slide, kiddie slide, play structure, and spray features. Water depths range from zero depth entry to 8 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","This pool was built in 1910 as a replacement for the municipal bath house which had been at the foot of Jefferson Street. The Jefferson Street bath house had once been a floating structure with a slat bottom. It was closed due to increased pollution in the Willamette River. The Sellwood pool was the first structure of its kind in the city. It was a large wooden edifice with a ten-foot board fence around it to provide privacy for the segregated sexes who switched off days. Girls could use the pool one day, boys the next. The pool has been in continuous use since 1910.","5038233679","Sellwood Pool"
"1132","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/southwestcommunitycenter?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642">Room Rental Information</a>
 
Check our <a href="http://southwestcommunitycenter.wordpress.com" target="_blank">blog</a> to get the latest details on SWCC programs, classes, events & more!
 
<b>Party Packages & Rentals</b>
We provide several party package options to meet your needs! Party package fees and facility rental fees are based on the number of people attending the party, the room being used, the length of the party (minimum of 1 hour room usage for birthday parties), and the party package requested.
 
For more information or to book your next party, please contact a Party Coordinator at 503-823-2849.
Birthday Party Packages & Facility Rentals - <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/?c=48642&a=234772" target="_blank">Rates & Information</a>
 
<b>Graduation Parties</b>
Southwest Community Center accommodates groups of 20-150 students for day grad parties and 50-400 students for private all-night graduation events.
 
For availability & rental information, please contact a Grad Party Coordinator at 503-823-2847.
 
Day Grad Party Packages - <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=48642&a=267985" target="_blank">Rates & Information</a>
All Night Grad Party Rentals - <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=48642&a=267987" target="_blank">Rates & Information</a>
 
<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51732">Pool Rental Information</a>
 
<b>General Admission Fees</b>
$6.50 - age 18-59
$4.75 - age 60 & up
$4.75 - age 13-17
$3.25 - age 3-12
Free - age 2 & under (with parent)
 
Indoor, 25-yard, 6-lane lap pool, heated to 84 degrees. Leisure pool with slide and interactive play features, heated to 89 degrees. Whirlpool spa heated to 102 degrees. Water depths range from zero depth entry to 9 feet.","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>","","5038232840","Southwest Community Center & Pool"
"1135","To reserve a sports field, call 503-823-2525.","","The stadium was named after Charles B. Walker. From 1930-1934, he supervised playground softball teams as a playground leader and in 1934, organized the first industrial and commercial softball leagues. In 1935, he was appointed as the city's first Sports Director. From 1944-45, Walker served as an American Red Cross Field Director in Germany. Upon his return from the war, he helped organize the first men's and women's softball tourneys ever held west of the Mississippi. In 1950, he was appointed as the commissioner of the Amateur Softball Association (ASA) for the Portland Metro area. He also served as the Pacific Coast Vice-President of the ASA. He retired from the Parks Bureau in 1969 after 40 years of dedication and service to the game of softball.","","Lents Park - Walker Stadium"
"1140","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","From the beginning of the planning efforts for the Pearl District in the early 1990s, the creation of a network of open spaces was an important goal of both the neighborhood and the City. In 1998, a conceptual plan for the new parks and open spaces was proposed by the Tanner Creek & Water Feature Steering Committee and approved by City Council. Those recommendations served as a point of departure for planning the district's parks.
 
In June 1999, Peter Walker & Partners, a landscape architecture firm, was retained to provide concepts for three new parks between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues in the River District. They developed and refined plans for the parks with input from a Project Steering Committee and two public workshops. The final plan is characterized by a series of recurring elements which strengthen the connection between each of the three parks.
 
Located between NW Johnson and Kearney, Jamison Square was the first to be developed. It is named in honor of William Jamison, whose presence was pivotal in the development of the River District. He was an exceptional person in his ability to influence and connect with a wide variety of people. His personal magnetism, in addition to the size and scope of his art gallery, drew many people into the Pearl District.
 
The focal point of the park is a fountain which simulates a shallow tidal pool. Water cascades from stone joints into low pools as the fountain continuously recirculates treated water with energy efficient pumps and motors.
 
In 2006 artist Mauricio Saldaña, commissioned by the Portland Pearl Rotary Club, created a red granite sculpture modeled after a brown bear. The bear's name is Rico Pasado, meaning "rich past," in reference to the history of the bears that once roamed this area as well as the Rotary International Centennial. This is why the sculpture is also referred to as the "centennial bear."
 
Another art installation in the park is <i>Contact II</i>, the 1972 metal sculpture by Alexander Liberman that was donated to the City of Portland in 2002 by Ed Cauduro in memory of his parents.","","Jamison Square"
"1198","","","The Foley and Balmer properties were purchased by Metro through the Metro 26-26 bond measure. The Foley property had been used primarily as a stable for over 90 years. Before that it was a rich and lush forest with Tryon Creek running through the heart of it. Today there is an abundance of plant and animal life present. The natural area includes both meadows and forested areas with walking paths and a footbridge crossing Tryon Creek.","","Foley-Balmer Natural Area"
"1199","","","","","Gates Property"
"1200","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","","","Sylvania Park"
"1202","For more information, visit the Friends of the Portland Memory Garden (FPMG) website at <a href="http://www.portlandmemorygarden.org/" target="_blank">www.PortlandMemoryGarden.org</a>.
 
To reserve a wedding site, call 503-823-2525.","","Located in the southeast corner of Ed Benedict Park, this garden is especially designed for people with Alzheimer's disease and other memory problems: the site is relatively flat and is away from other park activity and significant traffic noise. The garden was dedicated in May 2002 and is one of eight memory gardens in the U.S., and one of only two built on public land. The garden is a national demonstration garden project, created as part of the 100 Parks, 100 Years centennial celebration of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA).
 
This project was a collaborative effort among the Oregon-Greater Idaho Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association, American Society of Landscape Architects, Center of Design for an Aging Society, Portland State University/School of Urban Studies & Planning, Legacy Health Systems, and Portland Parks & Recreation.","","Portland Memory Garden"
"1205","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","Reuben Patrick Boise was a Portland school board member in the 1850s. He went on to become a circuit judge and then a member of the Oregon Supreme Court. Rev. Thomas Lamb Eliot was a pioneer minister, Multnomah County school superintendent, and a director of the Portland Library Association. In 1899, Eliot set up the first Municipal Park Commission for Portland.","5038231612","Boise-Eliot Community Garden"
"1216","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Brentwood Community Garden"
"1217","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Front & Curry Community Garden"
"1218","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Beach Community Garden"
"1221","","","","","Arnold Creek Natural Area"
"1224","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","Senn’s Dairy Park is named for the family-owned business that operated on the site years ago. PP&R and community leaders worked through obstacles, including possible contamination by leaks from an underground fuel storage tank, to develop this site. The Portland Brownfields Showcase Program, a generous environmental contractor named Pat Brady, schoolchildren, neighbors, and community service volunteers all pitched in to build the park. The master plan calls for an entirely native landscape, a grassy lawn with benches and picnic table, a walking path, a playground, and community garden plots. This project demonstrates a successful partnership; the community and city staff working together to create a unique neighborhood asset.","","Senn's Dairy Park"
"1230","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Sellwood Community Garden"
"1236","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Pier Community Garden"
"1237","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The park is named in honor of longtime neighborhood resident Dick Hazeltine, considered by many as a "founder" of the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood. For several decades, he has been at the forefront of many neighborhood improvement initiatives, including the building of the community center, establishing the neighborhood watch program, and organizing neighborhood clean-ups. His tireless efforts resulted in the development of the Nehalem property into a neighborhood park.","","Hazeltine Park"
"1239","<b>Skatespot Stats</b>
The skatespot is 2,800 sq ft and includes a unique bowl design with extensions and a curved spine as well as a smaller brick-stamped transition section around the edge of the park. Transition heights range from approximately 5-8' in the main bowl area while the smaller brick-stamped section is about 3' tall.","","For decades, the property was used as an experimental site for cultivating holly trees and was known as Holly Farm. When the owner left the property, the West Portland Park neighborhood advocated for converting it into a park. Beginning in early 2005, the Neighborhood Steering Committee, Portland Parks Foundation, Walker Macy, PP&R, and community members worked together to develop a master plan for the new park which opened in September 2007.","","Holly Farm Park"
"1255","","","","","Eastmoreland Garden"
"1258","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
<b>Artwork</b>
Granite disks, sculpted by Horatio Hung-Yan Law and embedded in the spiral pathway, represent the moon's phases. Various cultural ideas about the cycle of life are captured in the quotations, proverbs, folk sayings, and myths etched in the disks. Benches sculpted with squirrels and salmon by Mufu Ahmed provide seating in the park.","","Located in the New Columbia housing development, this park was named in honor of Bill and Gladys McCoy, African-American political leaders who brought attention to the issues of minority and low-income people in north Portland. Gladys McCoy was the first African-American to serve on the Portland School Board in 1970 and as a Multnomah County commissioner from 1979-1984. She was elected as county chairwoman in 1986. Bill McCoy was the first African-American to be elected to the Oregon Legislature in 1973. His senate district covered north Portland and much of northeast Portland.
<p>","","McCoy Park"
"1261","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","In 2000, Will Levenson and Starr Hogeboom, Friends of Trees volunteers who were in the Cully neighborhood selling trees door-to-door, noticed an ugly, dusty piece of land that Rigler School was using for overflow parking. Given that the neighborhood had no park, they came up with the idea of creating a community garden in that space. For the next two years, they applied for grants, recruited volunteers, solicited donations from local businesses, filed for city permits, and negotiated a lease with Portland Public Schools to prevent the land from being sold. In total, the group received $60,000 in grants and $10,000 in fundraising. Donated materials were worth an estimated $40,000. The garden opened in September 2005.
 
The Rigler Peace Garden, as it was unofficially named by the group of volunteers who built it, is used for both community gardening and for education. Its entrance, made of bricks and featuring a shiny sculpture made of galvanized steel and student artwork, invites children to learn about natural science as well as how to grow flowers and vegetables. A concrete path leads to a gazebo where teachers hold class. The inverted roof of the gazebo captures rainwater and funnels it down a chain into an underground storage tank that is connected to a hand-operated water pump. The north side of the garden is shaded by dozens of native trees, each one sponsored by a different Rigler classroom.","5038231612","Rigler Community Garden"
"1262","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","McCoy Community Garden"
"1273","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","This park is maintained with the volunteer assistance of the Friends of Tanner Springs. To find out how you can help at your neighborhood park, call 503-823-5121.","What is now known as the Pearl District was once a wetland and lake fed by streams that flowed down from the nearby hills in southwest Portland. These wooded hillsides provided a natural filter for the streams, cleansing the water as it made its way to the Willamette River. The springs from Tanner Creek, named for the tannery built by pioneer Daniel Lownsdale in 1845, flowed into the shallow basin of Couch Lake, now the area surrounding Tanner Springs Park. As the population of Portland grew in the late 19th century, Tanner Creek was rerouted through an underground system of pipes to the Willamette River. The lake and the surrounding wetland were eventually filled to make way for warehouses and rail yards which in turn were replaced by residences, shops, and public spaces. Today, the park sits about 20 feet above the former lake surface.
 
From the beginning of the planning efforts for the Pearl District in the early 1990s, the creation of a network of open spaces was an important goal of both the neighborhood and the City. In 1998, a conceptual plan for the new parks and open spaces was proposed by the Tanner Creek and Water Feature Steering Committee and approved by City Council. Those recommendations served as a point of departure for planning the district's parks.
 
In June 1999, Peter Walker & Partners, a landscape architecture firm, was retained to provide concepts for three new parks between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues in the River District. They developed and refined plans for the parks with input from a Project Steering Committee and two public workshops. The final plan is characterized by a series of recurring elements which strengthen the connection between each of the three parks. Jamison Square was the first to be developed.
 
North Park Square was the working name given the second block to be developed. Planning for this park began in early 2003. Atelier Dreiseitl, a renowned German design firm, and GreenWorks, P.C., an award-winning, local landscape architecture firm, were selected to design the park. A series of community workshops were held between January and June 2003, allowing citizens to participate in the design process. Construction began in June 2004. At the community meetings, the public was asked to submit suggestions for a permanent name for the park. After committee review, the name Tanner Springs was adopted in April 2005. The springs connect the park to Tanner Creek that at one time flowed openly through this area; today it flows through large pipes beneath the city streets. Since the design of the park attempts to recapture the area's past with its native wetlands and flowing runnels, the name is fitting.","","Tanner Springs Park"
"1275","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5038232279","Alice Ott SUN Community School"
"1276","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039166332","Arleta SUN Community School"
"1277","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039165615","Beaumont SUN Community School"
"1278","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5037623463","Centennial SUN Community School"
"1279","Because Clarendon Elementary School is closing, the SUN Community School program will be moving to Sitton Elementary School as of June 25.","","","5039166274","Clarendon SUN Community School"
"1280","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039165694","Faubion SUN Community School"
"1281","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039165865","Roseway Heights SUN Community School"
"1282","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039166421","Grout SUN Community School"
"1283","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039162910","Lane SUN Community School"
"1284","","","","",""
"1285","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039162915","Mt Tabor SUN Community School"
"1286","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5034082640","Parkrose SUN Community School"
"1291","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight
 
To reserve a wedding site, call 503-823-2525.","","In 1901, Joseph Wood Hill established Hill Military Academy in northwest Portland. He soon moved his school to the Rocky Butte area. Many street names in this neighborhood refer to Hill's Academy.","","Joseph Wood Hill Park"
"1292","<b>CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.</b>","","","5038235130",""
"1325","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Earl Boyles Community Garden"
"1326","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Senn's Community Garden"
"1327","","","<p>","","Portland Center Park"
"1329","","<b>Inclusion Services</b>
PP&R provides accommodations to individuals with disabilities/special needs, so they have an equal opportunity to fully participate in programs offered citywide. <a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=51926&a=318389" target="_blank">More Information</a>
<p>","","5039165654","Sitton SUN Community School"
"1330"," <a href="http://ohrc.pacificu.edu/memorial/" target="_blank">Click here</a> for more information on the Holocaust Memorial.","","The Oregon Holocaust Memorial was dedicated on August 29, 2004. The memorial features a stone bench adorned with wrought-iron gating, screened from the street by rhododendron bushes. The bench sits behind a circular, cobblestoned area - simulating a town square. During the Holocaust, many Jewish families were gathered in town squares before being loaded onto trains and taken to concentration camps. The square contains scattered bronzes of shoes, glasses, a suitcase, and other items to represent everyday objects that were left behind. A European-style, cobblestone walkway with inlaid granite bars, simulating railroad tracks, leads to a wall of history panels - giant, stone placards that offer a brief history of the Holocaust and quotes from Holocaust survivors. At the end of the wall is the soil vault panel. Buried below the panel are interred soil and ash from six killing-center camps of the Holocaust - Chelmno, Treblinka, Sobibor, Belzec, Majdanek, and Auschwitz-Birkenau. The back of the wall is engraved with the names of people who died in the camps, followed by the names of their surviving relatives in Oregon and SW Washington.","","Oregon Holocaust Memorial"
"1332","Ross Island is only open to the public through volunteer work parties.","At this time, access to the site is limited to individuals or small groups that volunteer on PP&R projects or those organized by our community partners: <a href="http://www.audubonportland.org" target="_blank">Audubon Society of Portland</a>, <a href="http://www.willametteriverkeeper.org" target="_blank">Willamette Riverkeeper</a>, and <a href="http://www.urbangreenspaces.org/healthy_river.htm" target="_blank">Urban Greenspaces Institute</a>. When PP&R completes a habitat management plan for the site, it will also include access options. For now, the best way to see the island is by boat or from the Springwater on the Willamette and South Waterfront. Numerous paddle trips are offered by our community partners throughout the year.
 
The first round of invasive species removal took place in the fall of 2008 by a contracted crew. Follow-up treatments will continue over the next two years with possible plantings starting in the winter of 2010.","Ross Island occupies the middle of the Willamette River in southwest Portland. Most of it is owned by Ross Island Sand and Gravel, a company that has mined river gravel there since the 1920s. On October 31, 2007, Dr. R. B. Pamplin, Jr. donated 44.83 upland acres, not including the lagoon shoreline edge, to the City of Portland.
 
Ross Island is part of the Holgate Channel and Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge complex. The complex makes up a significant regional fish and wildlife habitat and is one of the most scenic reaches of the lower Willamette River. It has been designated an Important Bird Area by the Audubon Society of Portland because of it use by both migratory and resident birds. There is a bald eagle nest on the City’s parcel and a small Great Blue Heron rookery on the island’s northern tip, property owned by the Port of Portland.
<p>","","Ross Island Natural Area"
"1335","Park hours: 5:00am-11:00pm
 
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Director-Park/104741209574390?ref=ts&__a=11&" target="_blank">Find Us on Facebook</a>","<a href="http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index.cfm?c=52453">Check out</a> rentals, events, programs and more at Director Park!","My grandparents, Simon and Helen Director, were part of a generation of immigrants whose hard work helped build this city. Simon Director (1891-1981) was born in the small Russian village of Chartoriysk. He arrived in Portland in 1910 and began work as a butcher. Helen Holtzman (1900-1976) was born in Warsaw, Poland. She arrived in Portland in 1915 and that same year met and married my grandfather. They had three daughters, June, Ruth, and Arlene.
 
Simon and Helen Director served their community with distinction, paving the way for their children and grandchildren and for generations to come. This park honors their memory and that of their generation in the hope that those who follow will continue their efforts to make Portland the wonderful city that we call home. <i>~ Jordan Director Schnitzer</i>","","Director Park"
"1336","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Hazelwood Community Garden"
"1337","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Peace Community Garden"
"1372","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Madison Community Garden"
"1383","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank">Find Us on Facebook</a>","","","5038231612","Vestal Community Garden"
"1385","Park hours: 5:00am-midnight","","The park is named for Elizabeth Caruthers, an early pioneer woman who was one of the first settlers in the southern part of the young city of Portland. Elizabeth Caruthers was born in Tennessee. In 1816 she married Joe Thomas, and the couple had one son. She later rejected her married name, and in 1847 she and the son, Finice Caruthers, came to Oregon. They settled here on the banks of the river near the abandoned 1842 Johnson cabin. Under the Donation Land Claim Act of 1850, they claimed this 640-acre section. Elizabeth died in 1857 and Finice in 1860. Their deaths, without wills or heirs, led to fraudulent claims and litigation, which reached the United States Supreme Court in 1868. There the matter was resolved in a landmark decision ruling that, under the 1850 Donation Act, a woman - married or not - had the same property rights as a man. SW Caruthers Street, SE Caruthers Street, and Caruthers Creek in Marquam Gulch also reflect the family's prominence in the early history of Portland.
 
Prior to European contact, over 50,000 Native Americans lived in the Portland area and hundreds of thousands of Native Americans came to trade along the river. During the time of early land agreements and negotiations with local tribes, the South Waterfront area became a relocation camp for Native Americans who were removed from other parts of the city. This is one of many greenspaces within our park system that are sacred and important sites to our Native communities.
<p>","","Elizabeth Caruthers Park"
"1396","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Gilbert Heights Community Garden"
"1410","<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Portland-Community-Gardens/139244076118027?v=wall" target="_blank"><img src="/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=348340" alt="Facebook" width="100" height="31" /></a>","","","5038231612","Furey Community Garden"

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