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[
{
"id": "low2001",
"type": "article-journal",
"container-title": "American Anthropologist",
"DOI": "10.1525/aa.2001.103.1.45",
"ISSN": "1548-1433",
"issue": "1",
"language": "en",
"page": "45-58",
"source": "Wiley Online Library",
"title": "The edge and the center: gated communities and the discourse of urban fear",
"title-short": "The edge and the center",
"volume": "103",
"author": [
{
"family": "Low",
"given": "Setha M."
}
],
"accessed": {
"date-parts": [
[
"2016",
2,
18
]
]
},
"issued": {
"date-parts": [
[
"2001",
3,
1
]
]
}
},
{
"id": "mcneill2011",
"type": "article-journal",
"abstract": "There is growing awareness among many city councils that their downtowns or central business districts have become bland or devoid of sufficient cultural activity to attract the highly skilled, creative workforce that is seen as a prerequisite for competitive success. This paper examines a recent set of policy initiatives to have emerged from the City of Sydney Council that has explicitly sought to mitigate the negative design outcomes of earlier phases of modernist office development through the promotion of a 'finer grain' urbanism, based around support for small shops and services, civic spaces oriented towards pedestrians and the reinvigoration of intra-block laneways enlivened by small bars and cafes. The noted Danish urban designer Jan Gehl was an important agent in the development of these strategies, along with the success of similar policies in Melbourne, illustrating the significance of globally operative design professionals and inter-city learning. However, these policies have not gone uncontested, and the paper examines the political context that surrounds their implementation in central Sydney.",
"container-title": "Journal of Urban Design",
"DOI": "10.1080/13574809.2011.548977",
"url": "http://foo.org/bar",
"ISSN": "13574809",
"issue": "2",
"journalAbbreviation": "Journal of Urban Design",
"page": "161-178",
"title": "Fine grain, global city: jan gehl, public space and commercial culture in central sydney",
"title-short": "Fine grain, global city",
"volume": "16",
"author": [
{
"family": "McNeill",
"given": "Donald"
}
],
"issued": {
"date-parts": [
[
"2011",
5
]
]
}
},
{
"id": "dupont2011",
"type": "article-journal",
"abstract": "The ambition to develop Delhi as a global city is rooted in the liberalization reforms of the 1990s. Parts of the city region were integrated with the global economy, providing international firms with investment opportunities and outsourced services, while the metropolitan area emerged as a significant agglomeration of Export Processing Zones. The development of modern infrastructure, high-end residential complexes and exclusive shopping malls, in line with the rise of consumerism and middle-class ideology, has spectacularly transformed the urban landscape. This drive for global competitiveness involving image-building has had negative consequences, especially for the poor, through ‘cleansing’ the city of slums and other alleged undesirable elements, and has exacerbated socio-spatial polarization. Delhi’s experience thus exemplifies the problematic implementation of a Western construct — the global-city model — in a metropolis of the South characterized by strong socio-economic inequalities as well as the ascent of urban entrepreneurialism and its translation into a ‘revanchist city’. Although Delhi’s trajectory is not unique in this respect, the magnitude of the informal sector combined with the increasing assertiveness of the social groups who have benefited most from the economic reforms provides a context in which the imposition of a new economic model and urban aesthetics generates particularly tangible tensions. What also makes the case of the Indian capital remarkable is the conjunction of structural factors—the overriding power of the state and the decisive intervention of the courts in urban affairs — with an international event — the 2010 Commonwealth Games.",
"container-title": "International Journal of Urban & Regional Research",
"DOI": "10.1111/j.1468-2427.2010.01027.x",
"ISSN": "03091317",
"issue": "3",
"journalAbbreviation": "International Journal of Urban & Regional Research",
"page": "533-554",
"source": "EBSCOhost",
"title": "The dream of Delhi as a global city",
"volume": "35",
"author": [
{
"family": "Dupont",
"given": "Véronique D.n."
}
],
"issued": {
"date-parts": [
[
"2011",
5
]
]
}
},
{
"id": "chang2003",
"type": "article-journal",
"abstract": "The study of ‘arts spaces’ has generally focused on physical spaces for the arts in the form of arts districts, cultural infrastructure and museum spaces. Apart from the provision of such physical spaces, we argue that the study of the arts should also focus on such aspects as the social environments and the creative spaces in which artists operate. Such a holistic approach not only facilitates an understanding of the myriad challenges artists face in society, but also opens greater research opportunities to geographers interested in the arts. Our case study of Singapore as a ‘Global City for the Arts’ provides insights into physical spaces of the arts as well as the social and creative environments in which the arts operate.",
"container-title": "Area",
"DOI": "10.1111/1475-4762.00155",
"ISSN": "00040894",
"issue": "2",
"journalAbbreviation": "Area",
"page": "128-141",
"source": "EBSCOhost",
"title": "Renaissance city Singapore: a study of arts spaces",
"title-short": "Renaissance city singapore",
"volume": "35",
"author": [
{
"family": "Chang",
"given": "T C"
},
{
"family": "Lee",
"given": "W K"
}
],
"issued": {
"date-parts": [
[
"2003",
6
]
]
}
}
]
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