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brfid / taskrc_dump.md
Last active Oct 12, 2020
My .taskrc (#taskwarrior #taskrc #timewarrior #cli #damnitstrue)
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.taskrc dump

Edit: taskwarrior is the best time management software I've used -- an opensource, command-line to-do list that can be modified to integrate with just about anything.

I've seen some people post helpfully their taskwarrior config, but not enough people. So here's mine, with a few privacy-related things taken out. Most of my customization has been in different report formats, and i6) n the date format. For the latter I'm working on sensible ways to incorporate the ordinal (1-366) date; you can see those defined below.

A few things to note: I track my readings in taskwarrior with user-defined attributes for page number, author, pubtype -- enough to let me export this to a fully-formed list.

As of now I sync with symlinks and dropbox across five devices and two operating systems.

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brfid / subscribe.md
Created Aug 20, 2020
Commit to Great Emails
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Commit to Receiving Great Emails

My great emails

I've attached this blog to a mailchimp newsletter accessible at https://brfid.github.io/subscribe/. I assume there'll be about one update a month, about Internet architecture and related. I don't know what mailchimp does with your email but I assume they already have them. There's also a validated ATOM feed for RSS at https://gist.github.com/brfid.atom.

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brfid / mdo.md
Created Jul 24, 2020
Mission Engineering and Multi-Domain Operations
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New Research: Mission Engineering and Multi-Domain Operations

I'm serving as Co-PI for a Lockheed Martin grant on Multi-Domain Operations (MDO). That's a warfighting concept described by the US Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) as the "rapid and continuous integration of all domains of warfare." At its core, it integrates the disparate technologies, strategies, and command structures that characterize the varied warfighting domains (subsea, sea, land, air, space, cyberspace). Its conceptual origins date to TRADOC's founding in 1973, which gave rise to predecessor concepts such as AirLand Battle and Full-Spectrum Operations.

MDO requires seamless and actionable communications in contested warfighting domains. As such it poses fascinating technological challenges. Indeed, linking tactical and strategic forces with com

View _independence_assumption.md

the independence assumption in 1957

I was about to write this post and forgot the file was live.

The Assumption of Statistical Independence is all kinds of important; in networking we can see it in the wild as stochastic processes, and more specifically as things like Poisson arrival. Kleinrock (1961+) referred to it as the Independence Assumption in his early modelling of nodes in a digital switched network. There's a fascinating history of queueing theory that may wait for another day. TLDR one of Kleinrock's insights was to apply an independence assumption to the traffic reaching network nodes in order to model their behavior.

Anyway, I noticed a 1957 article that fits nicely into the intellectual history network modelling: "Digital Simulation of Complex Traffic Problems in Communications Systems" by Lewis Brotman and Jack Minker, in _Operations

View against_crypto.md

Talk: Against the Encrypted Network Society

In a couple of weeks I'm giving a Zoom talk for the Information Security Group, Royal Holloway, University of London. It is entitled Against the Encrypted Network Society: Rethinking the Social Basis of Cryptography. If I end up developing particularly good slides I'll post them to this gist.

Here is the abstract; below (in this gist) is the cover of On Distributed Communications XII, a report by Paul Baran that I declassifed a few years back.

Since the 1960s we have been told that new computing technologies are ushering in a new era: the Computer Revolution and Knowledge Economy (1962), Global Village and One-Dimensional Man (1964), the Third (1975) and the Fourth (2015) Industrial Revolutions(s). There was never a consensus on which kind of computational techniques were behind the change. Then in the 1990

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brfid / _packets.md
Last active Jul 1, 2020
Why Do We Call Them Packets?
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Why Do We Call Them Packets?

Alan Turing used the term packet to refer to a fixed length (but not necessarily uniform) data structure used to order a larger body of information in order to facilitate computation in a digital computer. It is in his Computing Machinery and Intelligence paper (Mind 59/236):

Turing's Packet

He wrote the paper before he left the National Physical Laboratory in 1948, where he worked alongside Donald Davies. It was Davies, in turn, who introduced packet in computer networking to denote, well, what we call packets (but not datagrams) today. (And this is where, in computer networking lore, the story begins.) Davies recalls that "after disc

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brfid / _ccc.md
Last active Jul 1, 2020
Capitalism, Computation, and Causality: An Alliteration Nightmare
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Capitalism, Computation, and Causality: A Slide From A Talk

There's a lot of water-cooler buzz about the relationship between capitalism and computation. Did early computation make capitalism possible? Did capitalism lead to the elaboration of computation? And/or, should capitalism be understood as a form of distributed computation? Is capitalism an algorithm? Am I a computer? Is the solar system is one big atom? Are pre-enlightenment forms of similitude still the basis of most humanistic reasoning?

The major problem is that neither concept is well-specified. Or rather, some academic communities don't bother specifying it at all, while others specify it quite clearly but are at odds with each other over the best specification. In a talk I gave earlier this year, I mapped out some popular definitions for each, with very rough dates for each definition's emergence:

![Defining capitalism and computation](https://gist.githubusercontent.com/brfid/f

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brfid / f5_blog.md
Last active Jul 1, 2020
Create a Major Shift in the Security Landscape with One Weird Trick and Six Figures of Research Funding (which isn't a lot but it's enough)
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Our Major Shift in the Security Landscape

f5 Networks is a F500 firm that does application delivery networking. They've put up a lovely blog post on my NSF network security research project:

By treating networks, security components, and operations staff as part of an interdependent system, the metrics will be able to account for factors such as outstanding security vulnerabilities, strategic and long-term planning, and constituency interests, and will provide on-the-ground SOC analysts with ways to input local knowledge into higher-up decisions. This could have the potential to ignite a major shift in the security landscape by providing a powerful new framework for real-world security assessments.

Thus far their research team has embedded an academic researcher in a separate security operations center and is analyzing

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brfid / _vid.md
Last active Jul 1, 2020
Political Values in Technical Systems, or, the AES/AR15 Freedom Initiative
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Political Values in Technical Systems: Human Rights Protocol Considerations

Can you create political change by building politicized technologies? Should you try? Farzaneh Badiei and I are wrapping up an initial paper on how this issue is being debated in the IETF, the major Internet standards body. We ask that it not be cited until the completed version is out (soon). Here is the draft abstract:

Values in Design’ (ViD) is a framework that advocates for Internet protocols which, by themselves, further human rights. Recent work in this area draws heavily on thinkers such as Lessig ​(2006) and DeNardis ​(2009)​, and is pursued in RFCs ​(ten Oever and Cath 2017)​, Internet-Drafts, and the Human Rights Protocol Considerations (HRPC) Research Group of the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF).

This draft revisits the relationship between Internet protocols and human rights. It does so by investigating i) the historical and logical basis of the idea, ii) cases derived f

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