View Flexible Dockerized Phoenix Deployments.md

Prelude

I. Preface and Motivation

This guide was written because I don't particularly enjoy deploying Phoenix (or Elixir for that matter) applications. It's not easy. Primarily, I don't have a lot of money to spend on a nice, fancy VPS so compiling my Phoenix apps on my VPS often isn't an option. For that, we have Distillery releases. However, that requires me to either have a separate server for staging to use as a build server, or to keep a particular version of Erlang installed on my VPS, neither of which sound like great options to me and they all have the possibilities of version mismatches with ERTS. In addition to all this, theres a whole lot of configuration which needs to be done to setup a Phoenix app for deployment, and it's hard to remember.

For that reason, I wanted to use Docker so that all of my deployments would be automated and reproducable. In addition, Docker would allow me to have reproducable builds for my releases. I could build my releases on any machine that I wanted in a contai

View upgrade.md

If you want a run-down of the 1.3 changes and the design decisions behidn those changes, check out the LonestarElixir Phoenix 1.3 keynote: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMO28ar0lW8

To use the new phx.new project generator, you can install the archive with the following command:

$ mix archive.install https://github.com/phoenixframework/archives/raw/master/phx_new.ez

Bump your phoenix dep

Phoenix v1.3.0 is a backwards compatible release with v1.2.x. To upgrade your existing 1.2.x project, simply bump your phoenix dependency in mix.exs:

View zram.sh
#!/bin/bash
# Raspberry Pi ZRAM script
# Tuned for quad core, 1 GB RAM models
# put me in /etc/init.d/zram.sh and make me executable
# then run "sudo update-rc.d zram.sh defaults"
modprobe zram
echo 3 >/sys/devices/virtual/block/zram0/max_comp_streams
echo lz4 >/sys/devices/virtual/block/zram0/comp_algorithm
View HOWTO.md

Instructions

CloudFlare is an awesome reverse cache proxy and CDN that provides DNS, free HTTPS (TLS) support, best-in-class performance settings (gzip, SDCH, HTTP/2, sane Cache-Control and E-Tag headers, etc.), minification, etc.

  1. Make sure you have registered a domain name.
  2. Sign up for CloudFlare and create an account for your domain.
  3. In your domain registrar's admin panel, point the nameservers to CloudFlare's (refer to this awesome list of links for instructions for various registrars).
  4. From the CloudFlare settings for that domain, enable HTTPS/SSL and set up a Page Rule to force HTTPS redirects. (If you want to get fancy, you can also enable automatic minification for text-based assets [HTML/CSS/JS/SVG/etc.], which is a pretty cool feature if you don't want already have a build step for minification.)
  5. If you
View chat.go
package main
import (
"bufio"
"net"
)
type Client struct {
incoming chan string
outgoing chan string
View my_server.rb
require 'socket'
require 'rack'
require 'sinatra'
# Simple, rack-compliant web server
class MyServer
STATUS_CODES = {
200 => 'OK',
500 => 'Internal Server Error'
}
View WhyILikeGo.md

A slightly updated version of this doc is here on my website.

Why I Like Go

I visited with PagerDuty yesterday for a little Friday beer and pizza. While there I got started talking about Go. I was asked by Alex, their CEO, why I liked it. Several other people have asked me the same question recently, so I figured it was worth posting.

Goroutines

The first 1/2 of Go's concurrency story. Lightweight, concurrent function execution. You can spawn tons of these if needed and the Go runtime multiplexes them onto the configured number of CPUs/Threads as needed. They start with a super small stack that can grow (and shrink) via dynamic allocation (and freeing). They are as simple as go f(x), where f() is a function.

View ipcalc.go
package main
import (
"net"
"os/exec"
"github.com/k0kubun/pp"
)
func Hosts(cidr string) ([]string, error) {
View 0-readme.md

ruby-1.9.3-p327 cumulative performance patch for rbenv

This installs a patched ruby 1.9.3-p327 with various performance improvements and a backported COW-friendly GC, all courtesy of funny-falcon.

Requirements

You will also need a C Compiler. If you're on Linux, you probably already have one or know how to install one. On OS X, you should install XCode, and brew install autoconf using homebrew.

View import.rb
# coding: utf-8
require 'rubygems'
require 'hpricot'
require 'fileutils'
require 'safe_yaml'
require 'time'
module JekyllImport
# This importer takes a wordpress.xml file, which can be exported from your