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ccannon94 / spaceinvaders.md
Last active May 14, 2018
Space Invaders Assignment
View spaceinvaders.md

javafx-space-invaders

JavaFX Space Invaders game developed as an assignment for high school students.

Created by Chris Cannon

Overview

This is a basic JavaFX space invaders game. The code is split into three primary areas. Datatypes holds the underlying data that is used to run the game, this is basic code that holds information and provides it to the program. Framework is the code that is used to interface between the program and the computer. GUI is the graphical user interface, the code that the user interacts with directly.

Getting Started

View A3CommandLineGit.md

When you use git from the command line, use the following steps:

Accessing the Repository

  • On Windows, launch Git Bash, on MacOS or Linux, launch a terminal.
  • If you have not done so on your machine, create a directory to hold all of your git repositories. For a project this parge, it may be wise to use a directoy just for this project's repositories. You can create a directory using mkdir ~/Documents/aggie-autonomous-auto (or whatever you want to call your directory).
  • NOTE: This command only needs to be run once on each machine, to create the directory.
  • Navigate to your directory using cd ~/Documents/aggies-autonomous-auto.
  • If your repository already exists locally, navigate to it using cd [your-repository-name], if you want to check the contents of your directory, use ls.
  • If your repository does not exist locally, get the clone link from the "Clone or Download" button on the GitHub Repository. Clone or Download Button on GitHub
@ccannon94
ccannon94 / InstallingGit.md
Last active Aug 18, 2017
Installation Instructions for Git on Windows, MacOS, or Ubuntu Linux
View InstallingGit.md

Installing Git

The first step to working with code on your personal computer is to install git for your operating system. Git is a command-line utility that is available for every major operating system. The steps vary greatly by operating system, so look for the instructions best fit for your machine.

Installing Git for Windows

@ccannon94
ccannon94 / CommandLineGit.md
Last active Aug 25, 2019
Using Git from the Command Line
View CommandLineGit.md

When you use git from the command line, use the following steps:

Accessing the Repository

  • On Windows, launch Git Bash, on MacOS or Linux, launch a terminal.
  • If you have not done so on your machine, create a COMP167 directory in your home directory using mkdir ~/COMP167
  • NOTE: This command only needs to be run once on each machine, to create the directory.
  • Navigate to your directory using cd ~/COMP167.
  • If your repository already exists locally, navigate to it using cd [your-repository-name], if you want to check the contents of your directory, use ls.
  • If your repository does not exist locally, get the clone link from the "Clone or Download" button on the GitHub Repository. Clone or Download Button on GitHub
@ccannon94
ccannon94 / Forking.md
Last active Feb 8, 2018
How to Fork your Repositories
View Forking.md

Forking a Repository

What is a "fork"?

  • Just like branches allow members of a development team to work on different features independently of each other, forks allow entirely different teams or individuals to work on projects in their own "silo", so to speak.
  • Imagine you find a great open source app that you'd like to use, but you really need it to do one thing differently. The easiest way to accomplish this is through a fork! You can fork the repository, make the change you need to make in the code, and build from your fork of the repository rather than the original developer's.
  • If you think your change can benefit the community as a whole, you can make a pull request to merge your fork back into the original project, just like branches!

Why use forks?

  • It may seem like forks are just more complicated branches, so why use them?
  • Branches work just fine for any developer who has push access to a repository. Push access means the ability to push commits to the repository. You are
@ccannon94
ccannon94 / MergeConflicts.md
Last active Aug 2, 2019
Resolving Merge Conflicts
View MergeConflicts.md

Resolving Merge Conflicts

Sometimes, especially if you work on your project from multiple computers, you will experience a merge conflict when you attempt to sync with your remote.

GitHub Desktop Merge Conflict

Merge conflicts are a totally normal part of source control management, and resolving them is quite simple.

  • Whether you are resolving the merge conflict on the GitHub desktop app or on the Remote (using the website), the process is quite simple.
  • First, examine the two versions of the file below. Notice that both have different changes on the same line. One was edited in Netbeans, and the other from the GitHub website.
@ccannon94
ccannon94 / HelpProcedure.md
Last active May 7, 2019
How to ask questions using GitHub
View HelpProcedure.md

NC A&T GEEN 165 Help Procedure

GitHub Issues

  • Sometimes, you will need to ask questions about a program you are working on. Whether this is requesting clarification from a senior engineer about a project you have been assigned at your first job, or about your first Major Programming Assignment in GEEN 165!
  • Repository hosting services like GitHub will often have tools to facilitate this discussion about the project.
  • Keeping this discussion close to the actual code is important, because it saves both the development process as well as the reason why certain decisions were made, which is vital institutional memory for new developer to learn from, and more senior developers to look back on. Emailing questions is undesirable because the organization as a whole does not have access to this information, even though everybody could benefit from it.
  • On GitHub, these discussions can take place in Issues.

Creating an Issue

@ccannon94
ccannon94 / MajorProgrammingGitFlow.md
Last active Feb 27, 2019
Major Programming Assignments on GitHub
View MajorProgrammingGitFlow.md

NC A&T COMP167 Gitflow

Creating the Repository

  • The first step to working on your assignment is to create the repository on GitHub. NO code should be written before an assignment has been accepted, and a repository automatically created for the student. Your instructor will provide you with a link to your assignment. When you click the provided link, you will be prompted to "Accept Assignment" and then will be provided a link to your repository. GitHub Classroom accept this assignment screenshot GitHub Classroom repository link screenshot
  • Next, clone the repository to your local machine using git. To clone a repository, click the clone or download button on the GitHub repository page, and copy the provided url to your clipboard. GitHub screenshot of clone button
  • Using the terminal on MacOS or Linux, or Git Bash on Windows, navigate to your COMP 167 directory and then clone the repository using ``
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