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Keybase proof

I hereby claim:

  • I am christophermanning on github.
  • I am c10manning (https://keybase.io/c10manning) on keybase.
  • I have a public key whose fingerprint is 0D9B F520 8135 D8F2 779E 7440 CE2C C3D8 0F67 3B63

To claim this, I am signing this object:

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View README.md
~  ruby habtm.rb
Active Record 4.1.1
-- create_table(:articles, {:force=>true})
   -> 0.3158s
-- create_table(:publisher_magazines, {:force=>true})
   -> 0.0005s
-- create_table(:articles_publisher_magazines, {:force=>true})
   -> 0.0005s
#<ActiveRecord::Associations::CollectionProxy [#<Article id: 1>]>
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Created by Christopher Manning

Summary

This is an experiment using a random walk to draw shapes. Adjusting theta results in a very organic or procedural drawing. The random walk stays in the geometry by using a point in polygon test.

Controls

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Created by Christopher Manning

Summary

Kaprekar's constant is 6174. The Kaprekar Routine arranges four digits (zeros are appended to the number if it's less than 4 digits) in descending and ascending order, subtracts those two numbers, and repeats the process until the difference is 0 (degenrate case) or 6174 (Kaprekar's constant). The color is HSL with a scale of 0 to 300 in the

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Created by Christopher Manning

Summary

I created this to experiment with SVG rotate, chained transitions, and arc generated paths. I picked my company's logo since it has an interesting design and I had an idea of animating it.

My first attempt had me just using the d3.svg.arc() startAngle and endAngle to create the arcs, but that left the arcs with angled edges when they were rotated to line up. Instead, the arcs are full circles and white rectangles rotate around each arc to give the illusion

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Created by Christopher Manning

Summary

Draws a random walk onto a sphere using canvas and geo projections.

Controls

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Forked from: https://gist.github.com/gtb104/3667340

Here's a d3 plugin that allows you to create a polygon selection. You instantiate it just like d3.svg.brush.

var brush = d3.svg.polybrush();

It has an extra public method that 'brush' does not, and that's 'isWithinExtent(x, y)'. You can use this method to test if a given point falls within the drawn extent.

if (brush.isWithinExtent(x, y)) {
  console.log("I'm inside!");
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