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@davbo davbo/gist:5670378
Created May 29, 2013

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Museums app JSON snippet
"slug":"history-of-science",
"website":"http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/",
"lng":-1.255504,
"opening_hours":"Tuesday to Friday: 12-5pm; Saturday: 10am-5pm; Sunday: 2-5pm; Monday: Closed",
"_links":{
"items":{
"href":"/museums/history-of-science/items/"
},
"self":{
"href":"/museums/history-of-science/"
}
},
"_embedded":{
"featured_item":{
"date":"1559",
"origin":"London",
"slug":"queen-elizabeth-astrolabe",
"description_long":"<p>Astrolabes are the most admired and coveted of scientific instruments, but are also among the least understood. They are elaborate calculators, which were used by astronomers, navigators and astrologers to capture the movement of sun and stars, to determine local time, latitude, for surveying and to cast horoscopes. They are complex and challenging as well as mysterious, elegant and distant.</p>\n\n<p>This astrolabe was made by Thomas Gemini for Queen Elizabeth I, and was probably a gift from her favourite Sir Robert Dudley. That such an object should be considered an acceptable gift to a monarch shows the significance of Astrolabes to astronomical and navigational observation in the 16th century, as well as the intelligence and education of the Queen. </p>\n",
"cropped_image":"https://uom.s3.amazonaws.com/item_pictures/Astrolabe_cropped_7.jpg",
"_links":{
"self":{
"href":"/museums/history-of-science/items/queen-elizabeth-astrolabe/"
},
"museum":{
"href":"/museums/history-of-science/"
}
},
"floorplan_location":"535,547",
"cropped_image_resize":"https://uom.s3.amazonaws.com/item_resized/Astrolabe_cropped_7.jpg",
"subtitle":"An astronomical calculator fit for a queen",
"name":"Queen Elizabeth I's Astrolabe",
"link":"",
"description_short":"Astrolabes are the most admired and coveted of scientific instruments, but are also among the least understood.",
"original_image":"https://uom.s3.amazonaws.com/item_pictures/Elizabeth_I_Astrolabe_1300x1955.jpg"
},
"floorplan":{
"default_location":"379,1110",
"name":"Museum of History of Science",
"slug":"museum-history-science",
"image":"https://uom.s3.amazonaws.com/museum_floorplans/floorplan-mhs_2.jpg"
},
"admission_fee":"Free Admission",
"front_page_image_url":"https://uom.s3.amazonaws.com/museum_image/front-screen-mhs.jpg",
"name":"History of Science",
"index":3,
"description":"<p>The Museum of the History of Science houses an unrivalled collection of early scientific instruments from Europe, India, the East and Islamic World in the world\u2019s oldest purpose-built Museum building. </p>\n\n<p>See globes, sundials, clocks, early electrical, chemical and medical apparatus, Marconi\u2019s early wireless technology, Einstein\u2019s blackboard, Queen Elizabeth I\u2019s astrolabe, and Cardinal Wolsey\u2019s sundial.</p>\n\n<p>The objects selected for this app are all significant because of their owner, as well as their scientific uses. </p>\n\n<p>The Museum shows a series of temporary exhibitions, and has a lively programme of events and activities for all ages. </p>\n",
"lat":51.754322
}
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