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A Web of Rights, Digital Conversations, The British Library, 19 February 2015

###A Web of Rights, Digital Conversations, The British Library, 19 February 2015

Live notes, so an incomplete, partial record of what actually happened.

http://bldigicon7.eventbrite.co.uk/

https://gist.github.com/drjwbaker/fc453bad7a943a3a845c

Tags: bldigital

My asides in []


Panel Statements

John Naughton, CRASSH

The web is not the internet. Magna carta is a useful rhetorical device but no more.

Who would the Barons be for a Digital Magna Carta? @jjn1 suggests FaceBook, Amazon, Google & with GCHQ serving the drinks #BLdigital

— Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom) February 19, 2015
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Jim Killock, Open Rights Group

On the internet and not the web.

Digital world full of strange metaphors: email, documents as real things.

Do we agree that we should have the same rules on line and off line? #BLdigital

— Ernesto Priego (@ernestopriego) February 19, 2015
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Digital allows the collection of data. How do we deal with that.

Killer Q at #BLdigital: to what extent should non-digital laws govern parallelisms in the digital world? Rights, freedom, privacy.

— Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog) February 19, 2015
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Martin Eve, Lincoln

Freedom and rights to pursue enquiry. There is free as in beer and free as in speech. One is free cost, the other is free to act.

Talk about economics and freedom. Costs frequently situated at a different place - not reproduction but the realm of labour.

.@martin_eve: the Internet changes the overlaying economics of what we do every day #BLdigital

— Ernesto Priego (@ernestopriego) February 19, 2015
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Open Access: anyone should be able to access works produced in universities. It works because academics are paid to produce these works. They are actors that can give away their work to everyone, unlike publishers.

Our task remains to decide what we value and what it costs.

Key point from @martin_eve - we need to reconcile the fact that information 'wants' to be free, with real costs of generation #BLdigital

— Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog) February 19, 2015
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Joss Wright, Oxford Internet Institute

Internet isn't the only internet that could have happened. The one we have can only be changed at the edges, for example. How do the assumptions behind the internet impact on what we all do?

Freedom of speech saying. Freedom of expression access.

People tend to want privacy but drilling down to what that might be is complex.

Privacy is about autonomy and growth. To do without being judged. Privacy today often associated with anonymity, the ability to be anonymous.

We agree to Facebook, to Google terms. But we don't understand what we are giving away.

.@josswright explains the differences between freedom of speech & freedom of expression, also the benefits & rights of privacy #BLdigital

— Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom) February 19, 2015
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Privacy allows us to explore topics that our society may not deem to be acceptable.

.@josswright on censorship and how lack of access to information can impair societies/individuals to organise; protest #BLdigital

— Ernesto Priego (@ernestopriego) February 19, 2015
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Panel Discussion

Human rights are important because they allow us to define the outcomes of what we do, often things we didn't quite have a grasp of as we were making it.

Panel discussion: Are we in a self-induced, self-created nightmare of data, privacy, access, Internet assumptions, 'rights'? #bldigital

— Academic Book Future (@AcBookFuture) February 19, 2015
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Business model that emerges when selling some things (that need reproduction) goes away: what can we learn about people to work out how to sell them.

Unfortunate that politicians got the message too soon that the internet was about criminals making musicians starve.

Has technology combined with new social structures moved too fast for the law to catch up? Probably! #BLdigital

— Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog) February 19, 2015
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Naughton, 2015: "self-induced, self-created nightmare". Gibson, 1984: "a consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions" #BLdigital

— Ernesto Priego (@ernestopriego) February 19, 2015
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Most of the traffic is not people sitting back and watching rather than people making and creating.

.@josswright: "the Web is *not* Facebook" #BLdigital

— Ernesto Priego (@ernestopriego) February 19, 2015
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I'm happy to beta test software, I don't want to beta test laws.

@josswright: Law moves slowly, the Internet moves quickly. Huge niches to be filled, like free market approaches... #bldigital

— Academic Book Future (@AcBookFuture) February 19, 2015
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Or does it. Other areas of legislature moved very quickly to crack down on early utopian visions of the engineers.

There is an intersection between offline and online, we shouldn't think of them as separate worlds, zones, realms.

How does surveillance not contravene human rights? Well - as the argument goes - it is just a machine looking at it, labelling it, ranking it... Only humans can invade privacy.

Question then is where and at what point is your privacy violated?

Doesn't the Data Protection Act set out these principles? #bldigital

— Neil Fitzgerald (@N_Fitzgerald) February 19, 2015
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@martin_eve: Algorithms, systems, etc NEVER neutral. Humans create them. That's like trying to say that a spade does the digging. #bldigital

— Academic Book Future (@AcBookFuture) February 19, 2015
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Data Protection does not currently allow you to get your data back. In the future it may.

What about the market in you selling your own online profile data, eg http://t.co/L77IJbeXtj? #bldigital

— Neil Fitzgerald (@N_Fitzgerald) February 19, 2015
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Open Discussion

Sadly most folks aren't even aware that their search results etc. are personalised & not comprehensive @AcBookFuture @josswright #bldigital

— Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom) February 19, 2015
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Germany, UK, USA - all have different approaches to digital privacy management. Have to consider role of history. #BLdigital

— Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog) February 19, 2015
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The rights of the Web, our rights? #bldigital pic.twitter.com/ZScPoSiFUq

— Aquiles Brayner (@AquilesBrayner) February 19, 2015
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.@ernestopriego just asked about privacy on Twitter. Here's a public photo of him asking that question ;) #BLdigital pic.twitter.com/Ih1fknHGgP

— Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog) February 19, 2015
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Learning so much at #BLdigital about privacy, technology law etc. can see a real, important crossover with the 'open movement' - fascinating

— Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog) February 19, 2015
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'National Internet' won't work because of Patriot Act obligations #bldigital

— Neil Fitzgerald (@N_Fitzgerald) February 19, 2015
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Wonderful, thought-provoking evening courtesy of #BLDigital & @j_w_baker. A pleasure to meet James, @ernestopriego, & @martin_eve too!

— Academic Book Future (@AcBookFuture) February 19, 2015
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2nd day in a row doing sketchnotes! Really enjoyed #bldigital, ran out of space by the end. pic.twitter.com/FcqVVpniM2

— Melinda Seckington (@mseckington) February 19, 2015
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#BLDigital: mind BLOWN! Esp. Filter bubbles. Will we only ever see what we've already seen thanks to algorithms? World = smaller&smaller?

— Bex Lyons (@MedievalBex) February 19, 2015
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Had a great evening at #BLDigital. Thanks @j_w_baker, @ernestopriego, @Stephen_Curry, @Protohedgehog, @MedievalBex & many others.

— Martin Paul Eve (@martin_eve) February 19, 2015
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Thank you @Protohedgehog @martin_eve @miss_wisdom @j_w_baker @AquilesBrayner for #bldigital awesomeness

— Ernesto Priego (@ernestopriego) February 19, 2015
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