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package main
import (
"strings"
"path/filepath"
)
func fileNameWithoutExtension(fileName string) string {
return strings.TrimSuffix(fileName, filepath.Ext(fileName))
}
@eslindsey
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eslindsey commented Sep 17, 2020

TrimSuffix performs a check to make sure the suffix matches before removal. Since this is a guarantee because you are using the source string's own extension, I think this could be more efficiently written using slice notation:

return fileName[:len(fileName) - len(filepath.Ext(fileName))]

One could argue that yours is more easy to read.

@chmike
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chmike commented May 6, 2021

This is probably more efficient and straightforward.

func fileNameWithoutExtension(fileName string) string {
    if pos := strings.LastIndexByte(fileName, '.'); pos != -1 {
        return fileName[:pos]
    }
    return fileName    
}

@missinglink
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missinglink commented Sep 22, 2021

@chmike what about filenames with multiple periods like 'foo.tar.gz'?
strings.LastIndexByte will return 'foo.tar' when you probably want 'foo'?

@chmike
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chmike commented Sep 22, 2021

@missinglink My understanding and assumption is that the file extension is the letter sequence after the last point. A file name may contain dots (.e.g start with a dot).

The file extension .tar.gz should be .tgz.

@eslindsey
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eslindsey commented Sep 22, 2021

@missinglink if I were writing software to handle gzipped files, then it should properly find the name to be foo.tar after removing its .gz extension, so yes the function should return foo.tar. Also, what about users that make files like Footage from 04.04.83.mp4? Presumably you don't want this function returning Footage from 04. Extension should always be logically construed to mean "the last extension."

@chmike I hate .tgz because tar and gzip are two different things. Bothers my OCD, and my ability to find all the gzipped files in a directory. 😂 Two extensions totally makes sense to me in this case.

@missinglink
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missinglink commented Sep 22, 2021

ok fair enough, filepath.Ext() agrees:

The extension is the suffix beginning at the final dot in the final element of path

Bash has a few different ways of getting the extension, depending on what you want:

~% FILE="example.tar.gz"

~% echo "${FILE%%.*}"
example

~% echo "${FILE%.*}"
example.tar

~% echo "${FILE#*.}"
tar.gz

~% echo "${FILE##*.}"
gz

@othell-sr
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othell-sr commented Oct 31, 2021

It may be a good safeguard to have filename go through filepath.Base() first

return strings.TrimSuffix(filepath.Base(fileName), filepath.Ext(fileName))

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