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Parse Lexis Nexis html into rectangular form
library(XML) ## for html parsing
library(stringr) ## for easier string manipulation
library(plyr) ## for easier data manipulation
options(stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
## We want to parse the html output from Lexis Nexis, such as this one:
fname <- "The_New_York_Times2013-06-19_16-25.HTML"
## Inspecting the html suggests the following structure:
## Date: <DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1">
## Title: <DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">
## ETC.
## However, there is not a lot of structure to this html, and we will have to do a lot of work to parse it.
## Do a little re-structuring, so that each article is in it's own section
text <- gsub('</A>', '', readChar(fname, file.info(fname)$size), fixed=TRUE)
text <- gsub('<BR CLASS="c10"/>', '</A>', text, fixed=TRUE)
text <- gsub('</BODY>', '</A>\n</BODY>', text, fixed=TRUE)
## tell R that this text is html
doc <- htmlTreeParse(text, useInternalNodes=TRUE)
## split it up into a list, each element of which is a single article
docList <- getNodeSet(doc, "/html/body/a")
## write convenience fuction for extracting xml
getText <- function(x, xpath) {
unlist(xpathApply(x, xpath, xmlValue))
}
## loop over the articles and extract text and meta data
ArticleList <- lapply(docList, function(doc) { ## for each article...
## get the text and paste the paragraphs into a single string, separating them with two line breaks
Text <- paste0(getText(doc, ".//div[@class='c5']/p[@class='c9']"),
collapse="\n\n")
## get the date
Date <- getText(doc, ".//div[@class='c3']/p[@class='c1']")
## get the title
Title <- getText(doc, ".//div[@class='c5']/p[@class='c6']/span[@class='c7']")
## get all the meta data in a single string, omiting the first one (title, already got it above)
Meta <- getText(doc,".//div[@class='c5']/p[@class='c6']")[-1]
## split out the labels and values
Meta <- str_split_fixed(Meta, pattern=":", n=2)
## put the labels and values in a data.frame (1 row of values, colnames = labels)
MetaD <-as.data.frame(matrix(Meta[, 2],
ncol=nrow(Meta),
dimnames=list(1, Meta[ , 1])))
## return the combined title, date, meta data, and text
return(cbind(data.frame(Title = Title,Date=Date),
MetaD,
data.frame(Text=Text)))
})
## flatten the list of text and meta data into a single data.frame
ArticlesAndInfo <- rbind.fill(ArticleList)
## DONE! if you want you can write it out so you can look at it in a spreadsheet:
write.csv(ArticlesAndInfo, file = "ArticlesAndInfo.csv", row.names=FALSE)
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<STYLE TYPE="text/css"><!--
.c0 { text-align: center; }
.c1 { text-align: center; margin-top: 0em; margin-bottom: 0em; }
.c2 { font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; color: #000000; text-decoration: none; }
.c3 { text-align: center; margin-left: 13%; margin-right: 13%; }
.c4 { font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; color: #CC0033; text-decoration: none; }
.c5 { text-align: left; }
.c6 { text-align: left; margin-top: 0em; margin-bottom: 0em; }
.c7 { font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 14pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; color: #000000; text-decoration: none; }
.c8 { font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-weight: bold; color: #000000; text-decoration: none; }
.c9 { text-align: left; margin-top: 1em; margin-bottom: 0em; }
.c10 { page-break-before: always; }
--></STYLE>
<!-- LXNComment 2825:414855601 -->
<TITLE>&nbsp;</TITLE>
<META TOPIC="null" DOCUMENTS="10" UPDATED="Wednesday, June 19, 2013 16:25:02 EST" /></HEAD>
<BODY>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">1 of 2846 DOCUMENTS</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Reception For Obama Is More Sober Than in 2008</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By ALISON SMALE</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; Foreign Desk; Pg. 4</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">901 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">BERLIN -- The last time President Obama paid a visit here, as a candidate in 2008, he was cheered on by 200,000 Germans eager to see the back of George W. Bush and, as one member of that crowd recalled Tuesday, ''full of wholly unrealistic expectations of what kind of miracles Obama could work.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">When he arrived here on Tuesday evening ahead of a full day of talks -- capped by a speech at the Brandenburg Gate -- the reception was far more restrained. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Almost five years later, Germans have undergone ''a brutal sobering up'' with regard to Mr. Obama, said Ralf F&uuml;cks, who heads the board of the Heinrich B&ouml;ll Foundation, a nonprofit political organization in Berlin. It is, he said, as overdone as the euphoria of 2008, but also a bit alarming.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Mr. F&uuml;cks and other Germans say there are several reasons for the change in attitude. The most commonly cited: the president's inability to close the prison at Guant&aacute;namo Bay, continued killings by American drones and, most recently, the disclosure of an extensive surveillance program of foreigners.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Experts also point to the limitations on the power of an American president and on a country like Germany, which is the dominant European power but whose 20th-century history makes it awkward for it to take a leadership role or guide the Continent out of its economic doldrums.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''The American president would like to remind the Germans of the crisis, and what the consequences are if we keep sitting on our hands,'' said Henning Riecke of the German Council on Foreign Relations.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Mr. F&uuml;cks noted the ''permanent state of crisis'' in the world economy and politics since Mr. Obama took office in January 2009. When there is ''constant pressure to act,'' he said, it is harder for a president -- or, for that matter, his host, Chancellor Angela Merkel -- to shape events and lay down guidelines for sweeping action.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The conservative newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung was less charitable to the arriving president and his German fans. In an article from Washington by Matthias R&uuml;b, headlined ''The Return of the Feted One,'' the newspaper likened Germans' relationship with Mr. Obama to a lopsided love affair in which the American politician had always reacted coolly and rationally to ''the irrational inclinations of a people in Central Europe.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Daniel Hamilton, director of the Center for Transatlantic Relations at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins, said Americans and Europeans tended these days to roll their eyes at each other and lament the paralysis of the other side. Dr. Hamilton, who has spent the past seven weeks in Europe, echoed other commentators in noting that the agreement to open talks on a far-reaching trade deal -- one that would create a huge market operating on the same rules -- represents the best way for Americans and Europeans to put their closeness on a new footing.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">To judge from interviews with Berliners, though, there is little interest in or understanding of the complex trade talks, which are just starting. Rather, the data surveillance scandal has fired the popular imagination here, guaranteeing that Ms. Merkel, up for re-election in September, will raise the matter with Mr. Obama.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">It is not as if Internet users outside the United States did not know that their digital movements might be watched, said Patrick Conley, 47, a media historian who lives in Berlin. ''But you know it more exactly now,'' he said. ''In foreign policy terms, it is a catastrophe.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">That is particularly so in Germany, where state snooping was a dominant feature of the Nazi and Communist regimes. News that Facebook, which attracted 51 percent of German Internet users last year, according to the industry group Bitkom, had given up data to Washington's surveillance program was a special shock here.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Mr. Conley was in the crowd for Mr. Obama in 2008. While he remembers the jubilation close to the speaker's podium at the Victory Column, security forced him and his friends to sit in the surrounding park, far from the candidate, whom they watched on video screens.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The speech might have been electrifying close up, Mr. Conley said, but people near him drifted away before it finished. ''We noticed that it was written not so much for Germans as for voters back home in Ohio,'' he said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Nonetheless, he and the same friends discussed going to hear Mr. Obama again on Wednesday, and were disappointed to discover that this time it was an invitation-only affair for about 5,000 people. ''That is a shame,'' Mr. Conley said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Walther St&uuml;tzle, a former editor of the newspaper Der Tagesspiegel, recalled the June day 50 years ago when tens of thousands thronged the Sch&ouml;neberg district of West Berlin to hear President John F. Kennedy speak. There ''was no security madness like today,'' he said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Onlookers, who idolized the young president, moved freely, Mr. St&uuml;tzle said. And, he stressed, it was not just the Sch&ouml;neberg speech -- in which Mr. Kennedy famously uttered, ''Ich bin ein Berliner'' -- that impressed people. His second speech at the Free University of Berlin persuaded Berliners that he was a shrewd judge of what the Soviets were willing to risk in the city where communism and capitalism directly confronted each other.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">That cold war context makes a comparison between the Kennedy and Obama visits impossible, Mr. St&uuml;tzle said. ''The threat of war today is in the Middle East,'' he noted, ''not in Berlin.''</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/world/europe/reception-for-obama-is-more-sober-than-in-2008.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">US PRESIDENTS (91%); TALKS &amp; MEETINGS (89%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (89%); OBAMA'S FIRST 100 DAYS (78%); POLITICAL PARTIES (78%); ECONOMIC CONDITIONS (75%); NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (74%); POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS (69%); TRADE TREATIES &amp; AGREEMENTS (67%); INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (65%); FOREIGN RELATIONS (63%); CONSERVATIVE MEDIA (61%); TREATIES &amp; AGREEMENTS (60%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">BARACK OBAMA (91%); GEORGE W BUSH (69%); ANGELA MERKEL (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">BERLIN, GERMANY (93%) UNITED STATES (95%); GERMANY (95%); EUROPE (93%); CENTRAL EUROPE (59%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">2 of 2846 DOCUMENTS</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Protests Grow As Brazilians Blame Leaders</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By SIMON ROMERO; Paula Ramon contributed reporting from S&atilde;o Paulo, and Taylor Barnes from Rio de Janeiro.</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; Foreign Desk; Pg. 1</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">1109 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">S&Atilde;O PAULO, Brazil -- Shaken by the biggest challenge to their authority in years, Brazil's leaders made conciliatory gestures on Tuesday to try to defuse the protests engulfing the nation's cities. But the demonstrators remained defiant, pouring into the streets by the thousands and venting their anger over political corruption, the high cost of living and huge public spending for the World Cup and the Olympics.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In a convulsion that has caught many in Brazil and beyond by surprise, waves of protesters denounced their leaders for dedicating so many resources to cultivating Brazil's global image by building stadiums for international events, when basic services like education and health care remain woefully inadequate. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''I love soccer, but we need schools,'' said Evaldir Cardoso, 48, a fireman at a protest here with his 7-month-old son.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The demonstrations initially began with a fury over a hike in bus fares, but as with many other protest movements in recent years -- in Tunisia, Egypt or, most recently, Turkey -- they quickly evolved into a much broader condemnation of the government.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">By the time politicians in several cities backed down on Tuesday and announced that they would cut or consider reducing fares, the demonstrations had already morphed into a more sweeping social protest, with marchers waving banners carrying slogans like ''The people have awakened.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''It all seemed so wonderful in the Brazil oasis, and suddenly we are reliving the demonstrations of Tahrir Square in Cairo, so suddenly, without warning, without a crescendo,'' said Eliane Cantanh&ecirc;de, a columnist for the newspaper Folha de S&atilde;o Paulo. ''We were all caught by surprise. From paradise, we have slipped at least into limbo. What is happening in Brazil?''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Thousands gathered at S&atilde;o Paulo's main cathedral and made their way to the mayor's office, where a small group smashed windows and tried to break in, forcing guards to withdraw.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In Juazeiro do Norte, demonstrators cornered the mayor inside a bank for hours and called for his impeachment, while thousands of others protested teachers' salaries. In Rio de Janeiro, thousands protested in a gritty area far from the city's upscale seaside districts. In other cities, demonstrators blocked roads, barged into City Council meetings or interrupted sessions of local lawmakers, clapping loudly and sometimes taking over the microphone.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The protests rank among the largest outpourings of dissent since the nation's military dictatorship ended in 1985. After a harsh police crackdown last week fueled anger and swelled protests, President Dilma Rousseff, a former guerrilla who was imprisoned under the dictatorship and has now become the target of pointed criticism herself, tried to appease dissenters by embracing their cause on Tuesday.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''These voices, which go beyond traditional mechanisms, political parties and the media itself, need to be heard,'' Ms. Rousseff said. ''The greatness of yesterday's demonstrations were proof of the energy of our democracy.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Her tone stood in sharp contrast to the approach adopted by Turkey, where similar demonstrations over what might also have seemed an isolated issue -- the fate of a city park in Istanbul -- quickly escalated into a broad rejection of the government's legitimacy from a vocal section of the population.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">But while Turkey's prime minister has dismissed the protesters as terrorists, vandals and ''bums,'' Ms. Rousseff seemed acutely aware of the breadth of frustration in Brazil over the gap between the nation's global aspirations and the reality for many millions of its people.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The protests in Brazil are unfolding just as its long and heralded economic boom may be coming to an end. The economy has slowed to a pale shadow of its growth in recent years; inflation is high, the currency is declining sharply against the dollar -- but the expectations of Brazilians have rarely been higher, feeding broad intolerance with corruption, bad schools and other government failings.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''These protests are in favor of common sense,'' said Roberto da Matta, a leading cultural commentator. ''We pay an absurd amount of taxes in Brazil, and now more people are questioning what they get in return.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">One of Ms. Rousseff's senior aides said Tuesday that tax measures already adopted by the authorities would allow S&atilde;o Paulo to lower bus fares considerably, though it was unclear whether the concession was too late and too limited to derail the protest movement.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">One of the major complaints among demonstrators is government corruption, as evidenced by the trial involving senior figures in the governing Workers Party in one of Brazil's largest political scandals in recent memory.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">None of the officials sentenced in the trials has yet gone to prison, despite the prosecution's contention that they should have begun serving their sentences immediately after the high court announced them in November.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''We're furious about what our political leaders do, their corruption,'' said Enderson dos Santos, 35, an office worker protesting in S&atilde;o Paulo. ''I'm here to show my children that Brazil has woken up.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Some of the stadiums being built for the World Cup soccer tournament, scheduled for next year, have also been criticized for delays and cost overruns, and have become subjects of derision as protesters question whether they will become white elephants. One in Manaus, the largest city in the Amazon, will have capacity for 43,000, but it is in a city where average attendance at professional soccer games stands at fewer than 600 fans.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Government institutions seem prepared to continue plowing public funds into the projects. A Brazilian newspaper reported Tuesday that the national development bank had approved a new loan of about $200 million for Itaquer&atilde;o, a new stadium in S&atilde;o Paulo that is expected to host the opening match of the World Cup.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''When you see the investments in health and education and then you compare that to the massive investments to carry out the World Cup, it is clear that this provokes a certain indignation,'' said Ad&atilde;o Cl&oacute;vis Martins dos Santos, a sociologist at Catholic University in Porto Alegre.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">But near Avenida Paulista, S&atilde;o Paulo's most prominent thoroughfare, the scene was festive. Some protesters sipped cans of beer. Marijuana smoke emanated from parts of the crowd. Many painted stripes on their faces with green and yellow paint, the colors of the Brazilian flag.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''People are going hungry and the government builds stadiums,'' said Eleuntina Scuilgaro, an 83-year-old pensioner at the protests here in S&atilde;o Paulo. ''I'm here for my granddaughters. If you're tired, go home, take a shower and return. That's what I'm doing.''</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/world/americas/brazilian-leaders-brace-for-more-protests.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">PROTESTS &amp; DEMONSTRATIONS (90%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (89%); HEADS OF STATE &amp; GOVERNMENT (89%); CITY GOVERNMENT (89%); TALKS &amp; MEETINGS (78%); CITIES (77%); POLITICAL PROTESTS (77%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (77%); REGIONAL &amp; LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (77%); SPORTS &amp; RECREATION EVENTS (76%); STADIUMS &amp; ARENAS (76%); POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS (76%); EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION EMPLOYEES (74%); CORRUPTION (72%); SOCCER (71%); SPORTS &amp; RECREATION (71%); POLITICAL PARTIES (71%); POLITICAL CORRUPTION (71%); COST OF LIVING (71%); MAYORS (67%); WRITERS (64%); TEACHER COMPENSATION (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">DILMA ROUSSEFF (79%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL (91%); CAIRO, EGYPT (79%) BRAZIL (98%); EGYPT (79%); TUNISIA (79%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">PHOTOS: A military police officer doused a protester with pepper spray in Rio de Janeiro on Monday. The unrest continued on Tuesday. (PHOTOGRAPH BY VICTOR R. CAIVANO/ASSOCIATED PRESS) (A1)<BR> Protesters in S&atilde;o Paulo on Tuesday during a rally organized by the Free Fare Movement. A rise in bus fares set off the protests, but now they have morphed into a more sweeping movement. (PHOTOGRAPH BY MAURICIO LIMA FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (A8) CHARTS: The Rising Cost of Living in Brazil: Brazilians have seen the cost of many components of urban life rise at rates that surpass inflation generally. Expenses like private education and health care are common for many who are concerned with the quality of the public services. (Source: Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) (A8) </SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">3 of 2846 DOCUMENTS</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">A Political Stalemate Ends in Washington, With Food Truck Rules</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By ANNIE LOWREY</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; National Desk; Pg. 14</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">739 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">WASHINGTON -- A protracted legislative battle that has consumed this city -- one that has pitted established businesses against start-ups, energized politicians on both sides of the aisle and prompted a grass-roots online campaign -- has finally come to an end.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Washington has agreed on regulations for its food trucks. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">On Tuesday, the City Council passed new rules for the popular trucks, which have proliferated in the past few years, offering fare like Brazilian hot dogs and Laotian noodles. The regulations still need to be signed by Mayor Vincent C. Gray, but the gist is that the operators of the trucks need to apply to a monthly lottery to win the right to park in particularly in-demand downtown zones. Other trucks need to maintain a specified distance.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''It's a fair compromise,'' said Ch&eacute; Ruddell-Tabisola, the political director of the Food Truck Association of Metropolitan Washington and a co-owner of the BBQ Bus. ''Consumers will continue to have choices.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">But the long fight over the rules has enthralled this city, particularly among those who have delighted over the exotic new lunch options, and among conservatives and libertarians who saw it as a parable about the malign influence of entrenched interests and the overreach of the state.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''From a constitutional standpoint, the government has a perfectly legitimate role in regulating on the basis of public health and safety,'' said Bert Gall of the Institute of Justice, a public interest law firm that has lobbied on behalf of the food trucks. ''But the 14th Amendment is supposed to stop the kind of overreach that inevitably occurs when people, in this case the restaurant association, or an entrenched interest use their political might to install or create regulations that have a negative impact on their competitors.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In the past few years, the city's food trucks have thrived, their numbers growing to well over 100. The city decided to revamp its out-of-date mobile vending regulations, setting off a heated four-year back-and-forth. Some restaurateurs pushed for strict new rules, arguing that the food trucks did not pay their share of taxes, and that they remained unfairly free of regulations. The truck owners, in some cases, argued that the restaurants were merely trying to quash their competition.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Early proposals were flung up, fiercely debated and slapped down. One proposal, for instance, would have levied a $2,000 fine against truck operators who let their parking meter expire. ''Most of these food vendors aren't capitalized to the point'' that they could bear those costs, Marion S. Barry, the former mayor and current council member, said on Tuesday. ''They're struggling, hardworking citizens of the district.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The proposals kicked off a protracted political process and a furious lobbying campaign on both sides, with the food trucks forming their own association, campaigning on Twitter and even buying advertising space on buses.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The fight also caught the attention of conservatives and libertarians opposed to what they see as government overregulation. Scholars at the Cato Institute, a libertarian research group, howled at proposed legislation. The Institute of Justice, which has aided food trucks in other cities, got involved. Even Grover Norquist, the small-government warrior, put in his two cents, telling the National Journal that the proposed food truck regulations were a perfect example of big government harming small businesses.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">After all the wrangling, the City Council compromised.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Not all the food truck operators were entirely pleased with the results.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''Few businesses hand over so much operational control to the customers,'' Mr. Ruddell-Tabisola said. ''That's what's really special about food trucks. People can Facebook BBQ Bus, and say we'd love barbecue here on Thursday.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The new regulations tie the truck operators' hands, and depending on how they are carried out, they might make business harder, he said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Perhaps as is inevitable in the legislative process, all sides seemed relieved if unsatisfied. ''We're not completely happy. I don't think anybody's completely happy,'' said Andrew J. Kline, legislative consultant for the Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington, adding that restaurateurs wanted to ensure that food trucks had to comply with regulations just as sidewalk cafes and other brick-and-mortar businesses did. ''There are still a lot of issues to be worked out, and after four years.''</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/us/a-political-stalemate-ends-in-washington-with-food-truck-rules.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (91%); MOBILE FOOD SERVICES (90%); CITIES (90%); CITY GOVERNMENT (90%); MAYORS (89%); AGENCY RULEMAKING (89%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (78%); REGIONAL &amp; LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (78%); LOBBYING (78%); PUBLIC HEALTH &amp; WELFARE LAW (77%); RESTAURANTS (77%); CONSERVATISM (73%); BUSINESS &amp; PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS (73%); FINES &amp; PENALTIES (72%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">UNITED STATES (94%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">PHOTO: Food trucks at lunchtime in Farragut Square, near the White House. (PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHEN CROWLEY/THE NEW YORK TIMES) </SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">4 of 2846 DOCUMENTS</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Postcard From Turkey</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; Editorial Desk; OP-ED COLUMNIST; Pg. 27</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">868 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">ISTANBUL -- Having witnessed the Egyptian uprising in Tahrir Square in Cairo in 2011, I was eager to compare it with the protests by Turkish youths here in Taksim Square in 2013. They are very different. The Egyptians wanted to oust President Hosni Mubarak. Theirs was an act of ''revolution.'' The Turks are engaged in an act of ''revulsion.'' They aren't (yet) trying to throw out their democratically elected Islamist prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan. What they're doing is calling him out. Their message is simple: ''Get out of our faces, stop choking our democracy and stop acting like such a pompous, overbearing, modern-day Sultan.'' </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The Turks took to the streets, initially, to protect one of Istanbul's few green spaces, Gezi Park, from being bulldozed for an Erdogan project. They took to the streets because the prime minister -- who has dominated Turkish politics for the last 11 years and still has strong support with the more religious half of Turkey -- has stifled dissent. Erdogan has used tax laws and other means to intimidate the press and opponents into silence -- CNN Turk, at first, refused to cover the protests, opting instead to air a show on penguins -- and the formal parliamentary opposition is feckless. So in a move that has intriguing implications, Turkish youths used Twitter as their own news and communications network and Gezi Park and Taksim Square as their own parliament to become the real opposition.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In doing so, they sent a message to Erdogan: In today's flat world, nobody gets to have one-way conversations anymore. Leaders are now in a two-way conversation with their citizens. Erdogan, who is surrounded by yes-men, got this lesson the hard way. On June 7, he declared that those who try to ''lecture us'' about the Taksim crackdown, ''what did they do about the Wall Street incidents? Tear gas, the death of 17 people happened there. What was the reaction?'' In an hour, the American Embassy in Turkey issued a statement in English and Turkish via Twitter rebutting Erdogan: ''No U.S. deaths resulted from police actions in #OWS,'' a reference to Occupy Wall Street. No wonder Erdogan denounced Twitter as society's ''worst menace.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Three Turks in America responded to the events in Istanbul by starting a funding campaign on Indiegogo.com that bought a full-page ad in The New York Times supporting the protests. According to Forbes, they received donations ''from 50 countries at a clip of over $2,500 per hour over its first day, crossing its $53,800 goal in about 21 hours.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">What's sad is that Erdogan's arrogance, autocratic impulses and, lately, use of anti-Semitic tropes, are soiling what has been an outstanding record of leadership. His Islamist party has greatly improved health care, raised incomes, built roads and bridges, improved governance and pushed the Army out of politics. But success has gone to his head. He has been lecturing, or trying to restrict, Turks on where and when they can drink alcohol, how many children each woman should have (3), the need to ban abortions, the need to ban Caesarean sections and even what docudramas they should watch. The Turkish daily Zaman on Monday published a poll showing that 54.4 percent of Turks ''thought the government was interfering in their lifestyle.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">While the parents were cowed, the kids lost their fear. I walked with protesters on the streets of Istanbul on Saturday when the police, armed with fire hoses and tear gas, cleared Gezi Park. The pavement literally shook with the energy of young people telling Erdogan to back off. Or as Ilke, 30, an aerospace engineer standing next to me remarked -- before we were scattered by tear gas -- ''They are trying to make rules about religion and to force them on everyone. Democracy is not just about what the majority wants. It's also what the minority wants. Democracy is not just about elections.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Erdogan (like Russia's Vladimir Putin) confuses ''being in power with having power,'' argued Dov Seidman, whose company, LRN, advises C.E.O.'s on governance and who is the author of the book ''How.'' ''There are essentially just two kinds of authority: formal authority and moral authority,'' he added. ''And moral authority is now so much more important than formal authority'' in today's interconnected world, ''where power is shifting to individuals who can easily connect and combine their power exponentially for good or ill.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">You don't get moral authority just from being elected or born, said Seidman: ''Moral authority is something you have to continue to earn by how you behave, by how you build trust with your people. ... Every time you exercise formal authority -- by calling out the police -- you deplete it. Every time you exercise moral authority, leading by example, treating people with respect, you strengthen it.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Any leader who wants to lead just ''by commanding power over people should think again,'' he added. ''In this age, the only way to effectively lead is to generate power through people,'' said Seidman, because you have connected with them ''in a way that earned their trust and enlisted them in a shared vision.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Can Erdogan learn these lessons? Turkey's near-term stability and his legacy hang on the answer.</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/opinion/friedman-postcard-from-turkey.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">PROTESTS &amp; DEMONSTRATIONS (90%); HEADS OF STATE &amp; GOVERNMENT (90%); EDITORIALS &amp; OPINIONS (90%); 2011 EGYPTIAN PROTESTS (90%); PRIME MINISTERS (89%); MUSLIMS &amp; ISLAM (78%); OCCUPY WALL STREET (78%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (77%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (77%); MUBARAK RESIGNATION (73%); FREEDOM OF PRESS (66%); TAX LAW (66%); EMBASSIES &amp; CONSULATES (62%); TAXES &amp; TAXATION (54%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN (79%); HOSNI MUBARAK (58%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ISTANBUL, TURKEY (91%); CAIRO, EGYPT (90%) TURKEY (96%); EGYPT (95%); UNITED STATES (79%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">DOCUMENT-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Op-Ed</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">5 of 2846 DOCUMENTS</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>The New York Times on the Web</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Group of 8 Leaders Press Russia on Syria</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By STEPHEN CASTLE</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section ; Column 0; Foreign Desk; Pg. </SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">1011 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENNISKILLEN, Northern Ireland -- Senior officials at a meeting of the Group of 8 industrialized countries here struggled on Tuesday to draft a statement on the war in Syria acceptable to both Russia -- the main international backer of President Bashar al-Assad -- and to countries that want to see a rapid transition of power in Damascus.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Tensions over how to deal with the widening conflict and growing humanitarian crisis in Syria have dominated the two-day meeting in Northern Ireland that ends Tuesday. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The summit meeting's host, Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain, had indicated that he was hoping the gathering would yield a joint declaration as the basis for talks expected to take place in Geneva under the auspices of the United States and Russia.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">British officials hope that Mr. Assad could be persuaded to send a representative to those discussions, paving the way for him to relinquish power.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">But Western hopes that the peace conference in Geneva could take place in July were also receding because this might prove ''too early'' for President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, said a Western diplomat who spoke on condition of anonymity because the summit statement had yet to be finalized.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Mr. Putin has supported Mr. Assad both diplomatically and with weapons. He has warned against American plans to begin sending some arms to rebels there and he has said he does not believe the rebels fighting to overthrow the Syrian leader in a bloody civil war that has claimed an estimated 93,000 lives have the capacity to form an alternative government.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">As the line-by-line discussion of the summit declaration continued on Tuesday, there was a growing likelihood that Russia would sign up to a communiqu&eacute; with the other seven nations but only in return for softer language about a political transition.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The summit statement was also expected to announce initiatives on tackling global tax avoidance and on clamping down on the legal ruses used by multinational companies to reduce their tax liabilities. Britain is also seeking an agreement on preventing ransom payments in kidnappings, which it believes is now a major source of terrorist funding.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Late Monday, leaders gathered for talks over dinner to press Russia to overcome its deep differences with other industrialized nations and agree to a series of principles governing a transition of power in Syria.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Ahead of the dinner, President Barack Obama met Mr. Putin to try to persuade him to put pressure on Mr. Assad to negotiate a transition.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The five principles discussed over dinner were the provision of humanitarian assistance; moves to combat extremist elements; a declaration that the use of chemical weapons is unacceptable; preparations for stabilization after a change of government; and discussion over a transition to a new executive authority in Syria.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''Our objective remains progress toward a political solution which results in a transitional government,'' said a spokesman for Mr. Cameron on Tuesday, describing the talks between the G-8 leaders on Syria as a ''real discussion.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''It wasn't people reading out pre-prepared position papers. It was a real engagement on these difficult subjects,'' said the spokesman, who was not identified by name, in line with British government policy. ''There was an acknowledgment on all sides of the importance of putting in place the conditions that could lead to'' successful talks in Geneva.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">All eight leaders spoke during the talks on Syria, which took up more than one hour of the two-hour dinner, but Mr. Obama, Mr. Putin, Mr. Cameron and President Fran&ccedil;ois Hollande of France contributed the most to the discussion. During the talks, Mr. Putin argued forcefully that the Syrian opposition was not ready to form an alternative government, the Western diplomat said, adding that the discussion was frank but calm, with no raised voices.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The talks Monday night took place in a lakeside lodge with few officials present, over a meal of crab, prawn and avocado salad, roast beef and apple crumble.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Well before the start on Monday of the G-8 summit meeting, divisions were on display over Syria. Mr. Cameron conceded that he found some elements of the Syrian opposition worrying but sought to keep open the option of arming those who want a democratic future.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Speaking on Monday in Northern Ireland, Mr. Cameron, who faces internal opposition within his coalition government to arming the rebels, said he had made no decision on the issue.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''I am as worried as anyone else about elements of the Syrian opposition who are extremists, who support terrorism, who are a great danger to our world,'' Mr. Cameron said. ''The question is what do we do about that?''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''My argument is that we shouldn't accept that the only alternative to Assad is terrorism and violence,'' Mr. Cameron said. ''We should be on the side of Syrians who want a democratic and peaceful future for their country and one without the man who is currently using chemical weapons against them.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">After a meeting in London on Sunday with the prime minister, Mr. Putin responded in combative style after being asked if he had blood on his hands for providing military support to the Assad government.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''One hardly should back those who kill their enemies and, you know, eat their organs,'' he said, referring to a widely publicized video in which a member of an anti-Assad militia appears to bite an internal organ from a dead government soldier.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''Do we want to support these people?'' Mr. Putin asked. ''Do we want to supply arms to these people?''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The United States has said that it would supply some rebels with direct military aid, and Britain and France succeeded in getting the European Union to allow its ban on supplying arms to the country to expire, despite the reservations of many countries within the 27-member bloc.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">On Monday, Britain's foreign secretary, William Hague, told the BBC that there was no ''palatable option'' for dealing with the crisis in Syria and that ''extremists'' were supporting both Mr. Assad's government and the rebel forces. The help would go to ''moderates,'' he said.</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/world/europe/group-of-eight.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">TALKS &amp; MEETINGS (91%); WAR &amp; CONFLICT (90%); KIDNAPPING &amp; ABDUCTION (85%); CONFERENCES &amp; CONVENTIONS (78%); US PRESIDENTS (77%); CIVIL WAR (77%); INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE (77%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (77%); HEADS OF STATE &amp; GOVERNMENT (77%); MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS (77%); PRIME MINISTERS (75%); PEACE PROCESS (73%); INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (72%); CHEMICAL &amp; BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS (72%); TAXES &amp; TAXATION (70%); TAX CONSULTING (67%); TAX ENFORCEMENT (67%); MILITARY WEAPONS (65%); TERRORISM (60%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">ORGANIZATION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">GROUP OF EIGHT (G8) (93%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">DAVID CAMERON (79%); BASHAR AL-ASSAD (79%); VLADIMIR PUTIN (77%); BARACK OBAMA (57%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">DAMASCUS, SYRIA (92%) RUSSIAN FEDERATION (95%); SYRIA (94%); NORTHERN IRELAND (93%); SWITZERLAND (92%); UNITED STATES (92%); UNITED KINGDOM (92%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Vandals Hit Mixed Suburb Of Jerusalem</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By MYRA NOVECK and JODI RUDOREN</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; Foreign Desk; Pg. 12</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">605 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">JERUSALEM -- The tires of 28 cars were slashed and anti-Arab graffiti was sprayed early Tuesday in Abu Ghosh, a quiet Arab-Israeli suburb of Jerusalem whose famous hummus makes it a popular destination for Jews and tourists.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The episode was the first ''price tag'' attack in Abu Ghosh, a Muslim-majority town with a number of Christian holy sites and some Jewish residents that many see as a symbol of coexistence. It came two days after Israel's security cabinet expanded the legal tools available for investigating and prosecuting the racist, nationalistic vandalism that its perpetrators say they are exacting as a price for actions that they oppose by Palestinians or the Israeli government. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The security cabinet declared the vandals a ''forbidden'' group but refused to deem them a terrorist organization, as law enforcement officials had requested. Micky Rosenfeld, a spokesman for the Israeli police, said that since the beginning of the year, there had been at least a dozen such episodes of vandalism in the Jerusalem area, focused on Muslim residential areas or Christian institutions. Over all, Mr. Rosenfeld said, the police logged more than 165 complaints of racially motivated crimes against both Arabs and Jews in the first four months of the year.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">It was unclear what in particular might have prompted the attack in Abu Ghosh, a village of 6,000 about six miles west of Jerusalem where the words ''assimilation'' and ''Arabs out'' were spray-painted near the slashed tires.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">One of the oldest inhabited areas in Israel, Abu Ghosh was the rare Arab village to remain neutral during the fighting that led up to Israel's establishment in 1948. In 2010, it made the Guinness Book of World Records for creating the largest vat of hummus (about 9,000 pounds, served in a 20-foot-wide satellite dish).</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''I saw this in the West Bank, I saw this in Samaria, but I never dreamed the extreme right wing would get to my home in Abu Ghosh,'' Khatem Ibrihim, whose tires were slashed, said Tuesday on Israel Radio. ''Why? Because we teach everyone what coexistence is,'' Mr. Ibrihim added. ''My neighbor here is Jewish, and his tires were also slashed.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Condemnation was quick from both sides of the political spectrum. Shelly Yacimovich, the Labor Party leader who leads the opposition in Parliament, said such acts were hate crimes that hurt Israel's image in the world as well as relations between its Jews and Arabs. Naftali Bennett, the head of the conservative Jewish Home Party, who on Monday reiterated his opposition to the establishment of a Palestinian state, called the vandalism ''non-Jewish'' and ''immoral.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''There is a group of people who seek evil who want to create a chain of hatred and violence between Jews and Arabs in our country,'' Mr. Bennett wrote on his Facebook wall. ''A group that puts tools in the hands of our enemies in the world to blacken our name. We will not let them succeed.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu also said in a statement that the episode ''contravenes the precepts of Judaism and the values of our people and our state.'' The move by the security cabinet, he added, will enable the government ''to take strong action against those who perpetrate such crimes.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">But Jawad Ibrahim, who sits on the Abu Ghosh Council, said he was not confident that the strong statements would be followed up with serious investigation or punishment.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''In truth, we know that the security establishment handles these people with kid gloves,'' Mr. Ibrahim said in a radio interview. ''If the situation were the other way around, it would treat the matter completely differently. We don't delude ourselves.''</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/world/middleeast/vandals-strike-in-quiet-jerusalem-suburb.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">VANDALISM (94%); JEWS &amp; JUDAISM (90%); MUSLIMS &amp; ISLAM (90%); GRAFFITI (90%); CONSERVATISM (77%); HATE CRIME (77%); ETHNIC CONFLICTS (77%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (76%); POLITICAL PARTIES (76%); LAW ENFORCEMENT (75%); INVESTIGATIONS (75%); DESTINATIONS &amp; ATTRACTIONS (72%); TERRORISM (71%); TERRORIST ORGANIZATIONS (71%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">JERUSALEM, ISRAEL (94%) ISRAEL (98%); PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED (92%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">7 of 2846 DOCUMENTS</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">A-List Celebration Traces Leader's Trajectory, and Israel's</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By JODI RUDOREN and ISABEL KERSHNER</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; Foreign Desk; JERUSALEM JOURNAL; Pg. 12</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">965 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">JERUSALEM -- Barbra Streisand did not, as many here had been hoping or openly joking about, don a white fur coat and purr, ''Happy birthday, Mr. President.'' Instead, Ms. Streisand offered a pleading rendition of ''Avinu Malkeinu,'' a hymn from the Yom Kippur liturgy requested by the president in question, Shimon Peres, who said he cannot hear her sing it without crying.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">There was no cake or candles, only scant canap&eacute;s, at this gala in honor of Mr. Peres, who is already the world's oldest leader and turns 90 in August. There were former statesmen (Bill Clinton, Mikhail Gorbachev), celebrities (Robert DeNiro, Sharon Stone), scholars and scions (five Nobel laureates and authors of 1,412 books, all with a collective net worth topping $24 billion, according to organizers), gathered here at Jerusalem's convention center to fete Mr. Peres, whose public life has paralleled that of the modern state of Israel. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''We, in Britain, have our queen, and you have your Shimon,'' declared Tony Blair, the Middle East envoy and former British prime minister. Mr. Clinton cracked that Mr. Peres was ''the last living Israeli who knew King David,'' and had promised to attend Mr. Clinton's 90th birthday (he would be 113) and speak at his funeral.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">They came from across the globe -- or sent in glowing video tributes -- for a grandfatherly figure whose post is largely ceremonial, with little ability to forge peace with the Palestinians. Long derided across Israel's political spectrum as a schemer and serial election loser, Mr. Peres has grown in popularity as he has become a symbol of a distant peace. So Tuesday's two-hour tribute was a hot ticket for the local crowd, and a way for mostly left-leaning international figures to gain the benefits of supporting Israel without wading deeply into its divisive politics.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''We have buried people we loved together, we have celebrated great hopes, we have endured great disappointments,'' Mr. Clinton said. ''I have watched you in sunshine and storm,'' he continued. ''And the thing that I love most about you is a remarkable combination of mind and heart.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In this relentlessly informal nation where people wear flip-flops to Parliament, women were decked out in little black dresses, strappy six-inch sandals and sparkly baubles, though many men stubbornly stuck to shirt-sleeves. (''Why would I wear a tie?'' asked Mayor Rahm Emanuel of Chicago, though he included his favorite expletive. ''I didn't even bring one.'') There were ministers and moguls, rabbis and raconteurs, a tall blonde model with a plunging neckline, a religious soldier with sidecurls and an Intel executive inexplicably donning a black beret.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The 2,800 guests -- including a who's who of American Jewish leaders -- were asked to arrive as early as 4:30 p.m. to get through security for a show that started at 9, so the tiny mushroom tarts and eggplant puffs at the V.I.P. reception went fast. ''Where'd you find that?'' Dr. Ruth Westheimer, the 85-year-old psychosexual therapist, asked in Hebrew to a young man holding a finger sandwich. She followed him to the small buffet of potato chips, guacamole and salsa, and emerged with three barren rolls, one already bitten into.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''I hate stand-ups,'' lamented Abraham Foxman, the director of the Anti-Defamation League, as the celebration entered its third hour. ''See and be seen,'' he added. ''It's like you can't afford not to be here.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In a career spanning 66 years, the Polish-born Mr. Peres stumbled into two short stints as prime minister of Israel, played a major role in arms procurement and is credited with creating Israel's nuclear program. After helping establish early Jewish settlements in the heart of the West Bank, he shared the Nobel Peace Prize for the Oslo accords with the Palestinians. A prot&eacute;g&eacute; of David Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime minister, Mr. Peres is the last of the state's founding fathers still in office, and in recent months has strained the largely ceremonial contours of his role by speaking out on the urgency of resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and against a unilateral Israeli attack on Iran's nuclear program.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In an interview last week, Mr. Peres said that he had no regrets, ''because the past for sure is unchangeable,'' and that he would not retire when his term expires next year because it is ''better to die than to live as a bored person.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Tuesday's party kicked off a $3 million conference, financed by 40 individuals and foundations, and expected to draw some 5,000 people for two days of brainstorming and networking around the broad theme of ''Facing Tomorrow.'' It came after a public brouhaha over a separate speech Monday night at the Peres Academic Center, a private college, for which Mr. Clinton was originally scheduled to be paid $500,000 and guests charged $800. The British physicist and cosmologist Stephen W. Hawking also pulled out of the conference to protest Israel's policies toward the Palestinians.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Mr. Peres, in a dark suit and crimson tie, sat between his onetime rival Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Mr. Clinton, and gamely joined in for the chorus of ''Jerusalem of Gold.'' Throughout, he looked somewhat overwhelmed.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Virtually everyone who took the stage -- including Mr. Netanyahu -- spoke about peace. There was even a ''Give Peace a Chance'' singalong. Video greetings poured in from world leaders, Peres descendants, Facebook users and children translating ''Happy Birthday'' to Turkish, Arabic, Latvian, Ukrainian and Mongolian. Also: Bono.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">At one point, Yusef Jarajeh, a Palestinian from Hebron, took the stage after a video showing the lifesaving surgery he had in an Israeli hospital shortly after his birth. It was arranged by the Peres Center for Peace.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''Thank you, Shimon Peres,'' Yusef said, ''and I wish we would have peace.''</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/world/middleeast/a-list-celebration-traces-leaders-trajectory-and-israels.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (77%); HEADS OF STATE &amp; GOVERNMENT (77%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (77%); AWARDS &amp; PRIZES (75%); PRIME MINISTERS (75%); CELEBRITIES (74%); YOM KIPPUR (72%); BRITISH PRIME MINISTERS (72%); WRITERS (69%); NOBEL PRIZES (69%); CLERGY &amp; RELIGIOUS (66%); RELIGION (60%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">COMPANY: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">SPECTRUM ASA (66%); INTEL CORP (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">TICKER: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">SPU (OSL) (66%); INTC (NASDAQ) (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">INDUSTRY: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">NAICS541360 GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYING &amp; MAPPING SERVICES (66%); NAICS541330 ENGINEERING SERVICES (66%); SIC7373 COMPUTER INTEGRATED SYSTEMS DESIGN (66%); SIC1382 OIL &amp; GAS FIELD EXPLORATION SERVICES (66%); NAICS334413 SEMICONDUCTOR &amp; RELATED DEVICE MANUFACTURING (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">SHIMON PERES (92%); BILL CLINTON (91%); BENJAMIN NETANYAHU (56%); ROBERT DE NIRO (54%); TONY BLAIR (51%); RAHM EMANUEL (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">JERUSALEM, ISRAEL (93%); TEL AVIV, ISRAEL (79%) ISRAEL (96%); PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED (92%); UNITED KINGDOM (92%); MIDDLE EAST (79%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">PHOTOS: President Shimon Peres turns 90 in August. He is the last of Israel's founding fathers still in office, and in recent months has strained his largely ceremonial role by speaking out on resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Above left, at his official residence<BR>and right, being briefed by members of his staff in a Tel Aviv hotel. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY LYNSEY ADDARIO FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)<BR> A gala on Tuesday for Mr. Peres, second from right, included Barbra Streisand, Bill Clinton and Benjamin Netanyahu. (POOL PHOTO BY JIM HOLLANDER) </SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>The New York Times on the Web</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Attack at Funeral in Pakistan Kills 28</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By ISMAIL KHAN</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section ; Column 0; Foreign Desk; Pg. </SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">350 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- A suicide bomber struck a funeral on Tuesday in the city of Mardan in northern Pakistan, killing 28 mourners, including a provincial legislator, and injuring more than 60, a senior police officer said. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''It was terrible,&quot; said Jafar Khan, the deputy police inspector general in Mardan, about 40 miles northeast of Peshawar, capital of the volatile Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province. ''We had to make our way through piles of human flesh.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The attack took place during the funeral of an influential businessman who had been killed just a day earlier in a feud, Mr. Khan said. The bomber detonated his suicide vest just after last rites had been performed, Mr. Khan said, sending shrapnel and ball bearings flying.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Among the dead was Imran Mohmand, a newly elected member of the provincial assembly who had been receiving threats, Mr. Khan said. ''We had provided him with escort and had cautioned him against traveling too much,'' Mr. Khan said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Although Mr. Mohmand was elected as an independent, he had previously been associated with the secular Awami National Party, which has governed Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa since 2008 and whose politicians have been frequent targets of Taliban attacks.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">No group claimed responsibility for the attack.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Some of the critically wounded were brought to Peshawar for treatment, Shaukat Yousafzai, the provincial information minister, said in an interview. ''We condemn the bombing, whosoever is behind it,'' Mr. Yousafzai said. ''The bombing reinforces the call for a national policy to deal with the situation.'' His party, Tehreek-e-Insaf, or the Movement for Justice, has called for negotiations with Pakistani militants.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan told Parliament on Monday that Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif would soon invite all political leaders to work out a national policy on terrorism.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">He was speaking two days after Pakistan's largest province, Baluchistan, was hit by the suicide bombing of a bus carrying female university students and an overnight attack on a hilltop residence once used by the founder of Pakistan, Muhammad Ali Jinnah.</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/world/asia/attack-at-funeral-in-pakistan.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">BOMBINGS (90%); TERRORIST ATTACKS (90%); SUICIDE BOMBINGS (90%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (90%); WAR &amp; CONFLICT (90%); TERRORISM (89%); PUBLIC POLICY (89%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (87%); TALIBAN (78%); HEADS OF STATE &amp; GOVERNMENT (73%); PRIME MINISTERS (73%); INTERVIEWS (70%); STUDENTS &amp; STUDENT LIFE (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">NAWAZ SHARIF (58%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">PAKISTAN (94%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">9 of 2846 DOCUMENTS</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The New York Times</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Small Shops Seek a Voice At City Hall</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By KATE TAYLOR</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; Pg. 24</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">381 words</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Concerned about fines, taxes and regulation in New York, a new coalition of small-business owners is organizing to try to influence legislation and city policy.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Brought together under the aegis of the Partnership for New York City, a group better known for supporting the city's major financial firms, the coalition, to be called GoBizNYC, will seek to amplify the voice of small businesses in the city's political process, said Stu Loeser, the group's spokesman and a former press secretary for Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The group, which will include the chambers of commerce for each borough, will push for the formation of a small-business caucus in the City Council and will seek to become a source for elected officials and candidates on small business concerns.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The formation of the group reflects a frustration among small-business owners that has become an issue in the mayoral campaign, where many candidates are pledging to address concerns about fines and regulation.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">One coalition member, John Park, a Korean immigrant who runs a business selling medical uniforms in Jackson Heights, Queens, said the number of fines issued by the city in recent years had skyrocketed. He said that the city was still the best place in the world to open a small business, but that there needed to be more dialogue between small-business owners and the city.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''I'm not crying, I'm happy, but still we need a voice,'' he said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Another coalition member, Carol DiMarco, whose firm, Blue Label Design, is based on Staten Island, said the city's policies had hurt more often than they helped. She said she was motivated to join the coalition because she had watched many small businesses in the borough close during the economic downturn, and then after Hurricane Sandy.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''I know a lot of my friends that are in the restaurant business have really been hit over the head with violations and little things,'' she said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Rosina Rubin, an owner of Attitude New York, a limousine service in Manhattan, said many small-business owners were concerned about a law passed recently by the Council that requires businesses over a certain size to provide paid sick leave. But she said she also had a more mundane concern: her drivers' getting traffic tickets when they were trying to pick up or drop off passengers.</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/nyregion/small-businesses-with-group-seek-greater-say-in-new-york-citys-policies.html</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">SMALL BUSINESS (94%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (90%); CITIES (90%); MAYORS (90%); CITY GOVERNMENT (90%); CITY LIFE (89%); LEGISLATION (78%); CAMPAIGNS &amp; ELECTIONS (78%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (78%); REGIONAL &amp; LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (78%); CAUCUSES (76%); TAXICABS &amp; LIMOUSINES (73%); BANKING &amp; FINANCE (73%); RESTAURANTS (73%); BUSINESS &amp; PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS (73%); SICK LEAVE (67%); VEHICULAR OFFENSES (66%); ECONOMIC DECLINE (62%); ECONOMIC CONDITIONS (62%); ECONOMIC NEWS (50%); HURRICANE SANDY (50%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">MICHAEL BLOOMBERG (58%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">NEW YORK, NY, USA (94%) NEW YORK, USA (94%) UNITED STATES (94%)</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
</DIV>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c3"><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c4">June</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> 19, 2013 Wednesday <BR>Late Edition - Final</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c7">Energized by Bloomberg's Exit, Labor Chiefs Try to Sway Race</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">BYLINE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">By JAVIER C. HERN&Aacute;NDEZ</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SECTION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Section A; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; Pg. 1</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LENGTH: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">1410 words</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">After more than a decade of sitting out the fiercest race in town, leaders of the United Federation of Teachers are plotting a comeback.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">They have so much polling data that they can pinpoint the views of Puerto Ricans and Chinese immigrants alike. They can tailor messages based on brands of toilet paper voters buy. Normally busy handling complaints from teachers, they are now scouring financial records and questioning candidates about $4,000 restaurant bills.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">And on Wednesday, the union will throw its sophisticated political machine behind a candidate for mayor of New York City.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Unions across the city, after years of low morale and stalled contract negotiations, are roaring back to life this election season, excited by the prospect of installing a friend of labor in City Hall when Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg leaves office at the end of the year. </SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Some groups, like the teachers' union, are expected to spend several million dollars on the race. Several labor leaders are weighing advertising blitzes aimed at the broader public. Political organizers are training callers, social media activists and door-to-door canvassers.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''Politics in the city are shifting,'' Michael Mulgrew, president of the teachers' union, said. ''It's not a pipe dream. We're going to be a force.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Labor leaders face several challenges as they seek to reassert themselves as political heavyweights in a city that has not elected a Democrat for mayor since 1989. In a crowded field, they are split over whom to endorse, causing concern that they might cancel one another out.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">At a time of declining union membership and lingering economic turmoil, the strength of organized labor is unclear. Public officials across the country, including Mr. Bloomberg, a political independent, have cast doubt on their motives, and pushed back against demands from municipal workers for retroactive raises and more generous health benefits. And a new pro-business group in New York is preparing to spend millions on City Council races.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Still, political experts say there is potential for organized labor to sway the mayoral election. Analysts expect only modest turnout -- around 650,000 voters, or about one-fifth of registered Democrats -- in the Democratic primary in September. A runoff election is widely expected, raising the stakes.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Each of the city's large unions can be valuable to different candidates. Unions representing lower-paid service workers might be able to deliver black and Latino voters for candidates who will rely more heavily on them, like William C. Thompson Jr., a former comptroller, and Bill de Blasio, the public advocate. The teachers' union, whose membership is more middle-class, says it has a database of 171,000 teachers, retirees and their relatives.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''Unions know their membership and can motivate them,'' said Edward F. Ott, a lecturer at the Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies at the City University of New York. ''The impact may be reduced and spread across a lot of candidates, but they'll definitely have an impact.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Exactly how much the unions will spend in the mayoral race depends on several factors, including whether they face competition from other unions or from political action groups seeking to dampen the influence of organized labor.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''It could be the wild, wild West,'' said Neal Kwatra, a Democratic strategist whose clients include unions, ''or it could be business as usual.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The teachers' union endorsement is considered a prize because of its politically engaged work force, a treasury of at least $2.5 million and a team that has refined its political operations after years of bitter feuds with Mr. Bloomberg.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The seven leading Democratic candidates for mayor are mostly in line with the union's ideology, backing its calls to reduce testing and offer more support to failing schools. In recent days, some have stepped up their efforts to court the union's leaders.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Mr. Thompson, a former president of the city's Board of Education, recently announced a plan to give each teacher a $200 budget for classroom supplies. On Tuesday, he picked up the support of the principals' union, the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Mr. de Blasio, another leading candidate for the teachers' union's endorsement, stood with Mr. Mulgrew last week to denounce high-stakes testing.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The union last made an endorsement for mayor in 2001, when it selected Mark Green, a Democrat, over Mr. Bloomberg, then a Republican. It did not enter the contests in 2005 and 2009, wary of Mr. Bloomberg's vast financial resources. Some union officials regretted the decision to skip the 2009 race, after Mr. Thompson, then the Democratic nominee, came within striking distance of Mr. Bloomberg, who spent more than $100 million of his fortune on that race alone.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">When Mr. Mulgrew became the union's president in 2009, he set out to modernize its political operations. In the past, he said, candidates were chosen based on personal relationships. Now union officials look to polls and focus groups, tossing around terms like ''burn rates'' and ''propensity models.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">The union has become adroit in scrutinizing public spending records to gauge which candidates are more efficient stewards of campaign money. It can examine, for instance, how much a candidate earns at a fund-raiser relative to how much he or she spends on catering, entertainment and facilities.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">With a trove of data on the table, conversations between the candidates and Mr. Mulgrew have turned into cross-examinations. He has set benchmarks for each of them, asking them to prove they could build support among crucial demographic groups, like Hispanic voters in Upper Manhattan.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''It's all about a path to victory,'' he said.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">On Wednesday, Mr. Mulgrew will recommend a candidate to union delegates, who are expected to approve the choice that day. He is said to be focusing on two candidates -- Mr. de Blasio and Mr. Thompson -- though he has also expressed admiration for Christine C. Quinn, the Council speaker. He faces pressure from Local 1199 of the Service Employees International Union, the city's largest union, which has lobbied him to create a broad labor coalition by following its lead and endorsing Mr. de Blasio. Another influential union, District Council 37, has endorsed John C. Liu, the city comptroller.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">A central part of the union's strategy for this election is to use tools more common in national campaigns. It has put together a database of its members, and bought access to information like the purchasing history of people who use chain-store rewards cards. For example, the union might focus calls and mailings on people who buy top-shelf brands of toilet paper or other products, which typically suggest that a person has a higher income and is more likely to vote. It could also use the information to tailor advertisements to certain groups of voters, like placing a container of Cherry Garcia in an ad directed at people who buy Ben &amp; Jerry's ice cream.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">This year, public sector unions are bolstering their political operations after several years of failed negotiations. More than 282,000 unionized workers are without a contract, representing 95 percent of the city's work force. Workers are seeking as much as $7.8 billion in retroactive raises for the time they have been without a contract. Mr. Bloomberg has said the city does not have the money.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">In response, union leaders representing those workers are letting the clock tick as they build political support. Several unions joined together to produce a $200,000 advertising campaign recently. A radio ad said in part: ''The people who keep this city running: hard-working, middle-class New Yorkers. They count. They vote.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Harry Nespoli, leader of a committee of unions representing municipal workers, said they wanted a mayor who would work with unions to find savings in the city budget to pay for wage increases.</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">''We don't expect the new mayor to give away the store,'' he said. ''We expect the new mayor to recognize the fact that we are the city and that we should have negotiations in good faith.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Even if the city's labor leaders do not coalesce around one candidate, Mr. Nespoli said, they are united in their frustration with Mr. Bloomberg, who on Monday compared the endorsement of the teachers' union to the ''kiss of death.''</SPAN></P>
<P CLASS="c9"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Union officials now have their own retort. They have taken to repeating three numbers, 12-31-13, a reference to the mayor's final day in office.</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">URL: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/nyregion/labor-seeks-influence-in-new-yorks-mayoral-race.html</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">SUBJECT: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">TEACHING &amp; TEACHERS (91%); TEACHER UNIONS (91%); </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c4">POLITICS</SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2"> (90%); CITIES (90%); MAYORS (90%); LABOR UNIONS (90%); CITY GOVERNMENT (90%); REGIONAL &amp; LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (90%); ELECTIONS (89%); CAMPAIGNS &amp; ELECTIONS (89%); VOTERS &amp; VOTING (89%); US DEMOCRATIC PARTY (89%); EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION EMPLOYEES (89%); COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (78%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (78%); PRIMARY ELECTIONS (77%); HISPANIC AMERICANS (77%); RUNOFF ELECTIONS (77%); POLITICAL CANDIDATES (76%); POLITICAL PARTIES (76%); POLITICAL ORGANIZING (75%); AFRICAN AMERICANS (75%); EMPLOYEE TRAINING (72%); RESTAURANTS (71%); ECONOMIC CRISIS (71%); CIVIL SERVICES (62%)</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">ORGANIZATION: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">UNITED FEDERATION OF TEACHERS (91%)</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PERSON: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">MICHAEL BLOOMBERG (79%)</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GEOGRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">NEW YORK, NY, USA (79%) NEW YORK, USA (92%) UNITED STATES (92%)</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LOAD-DATE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">June 19, 2013</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">LANGUAGE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">ENGLISH</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">GRAPHIC: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">PHOTO: ''It's not a pipe dream,'' said Michael Mulgrew, president of the United Federation of Teachers. ''We're going to be a force.'' (PHOTOGRAPH BY ERIC THAYER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (A25) </SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c5"><P CLASS="c6"><SPAN CLASS="c8">PUBLICATION-TYPE: </SPAN><SPAN CLASS="c2">Newspaper</SPAN></P>
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<BR><DIV CLASS="c0"><BR><P CLASS="c1"><SPAN CLASS="c2">Copyright 2013 The New York Times Company</SPAN></P>
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