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How WCIJ made footnotes that expand to annotations upon clicking (Largo Project website)
/* Start by defining some CSS for the page. The links are fake (reflink, fauxlink). I started with xkcd tooltip, which pop up and are a defined width, but I realized full-width expanding text would be better for mobile users. */
<style type="text/css"> .ref {position: relative; vertical-align: baseline; } .reflink {color:#0065a4; cursor:pointer; font-size:.7em; font-family: 'ff-dagny-web-pro', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; } .fauxlink { color:#0065a4; cursor:pointer; font-family: 'ff-dagny-web-pro', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: .8em;} .refbody { color: #969696; font-size: .7em; font-family: 'ff-dagny-web-pro', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;}</style>
<h2>1. Frac sand mining is not fracking.</h2>
<img src="http://wisconsinwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/image-number-01.gif" alt="Frac sand mining is not fracking" width="500" height="500" />
A lot of people get this confused. Frac sand mining is not fracking. It is mining for the sand that gets injected into deep wells in the <a href="http://www.earthworksaction.org/issues/detail/hydraulic_fracturing_101#.VNU1zFXF_pA">hydraulic fracturing</a> process of extracting oil and natural gas. This process is happening in places like Texas and North Dakota, not Wisconsin.
<span class="ref"><span class="reflink">[Sand industry comments]</span><span class="refbody">
<span class="fauxlink">close annotation</span>
WISA: Absolutely true – Wisconsin doesn’t have the oil and natural gas deposits that fracking targets. But it’s also true that “frac sand mining” is a misnomer. Wisconsin-mined sand is used for a <a href="http://www.wisconsinsand.org/industrial-sand/">variety of end purposes</a> including glassmaking, foundry and metal casting, construction, production of paint and coatings, recreational materials and more, in addition to oil and gas exploration. It would be just as accurate to call Wisconsin sand “glass sand” or “playground sand.” The umbrella term that fits all uses is “industrial sand.”</span></span>
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kategolden commented Apr 7, 2015

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