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Tom Igoe's initial graphing code for processing
/*
Serial Graphing Sketch
by Tom Igoe
Language: Processing
This sketch takes ASCII values from the serial port
at 9600 bps and graphs them.
The values should be comma-delimited, with a newline
at the end of every set of values.
The expected range of the values is between 0 and 1023.
Created 20 April 2005
Updated 27 June 2008
*/
import processing.serial.*;
int maxNumberOfSensors = 6; // Arduino has 6 analog inputs, so I chose 6
boolean fontInitialized = false; // whether the font's been initialized
Serial myPort; // The serial port
float[] previousValue = new float[maxNumberOfSensors]; // array of previous values
int xpos = 0; // x position of the graph
PFont myFont; // font for writing text to the window
void setup () {
// set up the window to whatever size you want:
size(800, 600);
// List all the available serial ports:
println(Serial.list());
// I know that the first port in the serial list on my mac
// is always my Arduino or Wiring module, so I open Serial.list()[0].
// Open whatever port is the one you're using.
String portName = Serial.list()[0];
myPort = new Serial(this, portName, 9600);
myPort.clear();
// don't generate a serialEvent() until you get a newline (\n) byte:
myPort.bufferUntil('\n');
// create a font with the fourth font available to the system:
myFont = createFont(PFont.list()[3], 14);
textFont(myFont);
fontInitialized = true;
// set inital background:
background(0);
// turn on antialiasing:
smooth();
}
void draw () {
// nothing happens in the draw loop,
// but it's needed to keep the program running
}
void serialEvent (Serial myPort) {
// get the ASCII string:
String inString = myPort.readStringUntil('\n');
// if it's not empty:
if (inString != null) {
// trim off any whitespace:
inString = trim(inString);
// convert to an array of ints:
int incomingValues[] = int(split(inString, ","));
// print out the values
// print("length: " + incomingValues.length + " values.\t");
if (incomingValues.length <= maxNumberOfSensors && incomingValues.length > 0) {
for (int i = 0; i < incomingValues.length; i++) {
// map the incoming values (0 to 1023) to an appropriate
// graphing range (0 to window height/number of values):
float ypos = map(incomingValues[i], 0, 1023, 0, height/incomingValues.length);
// figure out the y position for this particular graph:
float graphBottom = i * height/incomingValues.length;
ypos = ypos + graphBottom;
// make a black block to erase the previous text:
noStroke();
fill(0);
rect(10, graphBottom+1, 110, 20);
// print the sensor numbers to the screen:
fill(255);
int textPos = int(graphBottom) + 14;
// sometimes serialEvent() can happen before setup() is done.
// so you need to make sure the font is initialized before
// you text():
if (fontInitialized) {
text("Sensor " + i + ":" + incomingValues[i], 10, textPos);
}
// draw a line at the bottom of each graph:
stroke(127);
line(0, graphBottom, width, graphBottom);
// change colors to draw the graph line:
stroke(64*i, 32*i, 255);
line(xpos, previousValue[i], xpos+1, ypos);
// save the current value to be the next time's previous value:
previousValue[i] = ypos;
}
}
// if you've drawn to the edge of the window, start at the beginning again:
if (xpos >= width) {
xpos = 0;
background(0);
}
else {
xpos++;
}
}
}
@madeintaiwan

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@madeintaiwan madeintaiwan commented Sep 2, 2013

http://www.tigoe.com/pcomp/code/Processing/122/

There's a sketch to do what I'd like but I'm trying to figure out how to display the five at once (if possible)

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@madeintaiwan madeintaiwan commented Sep 2, 2013

https://forum.processing.org/topic/graph-inside-circle-ellipse

Ideally I think this would be a very good way of displaying the inputs, polar graph with a 3rd dimension possibly

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@lpetre lpetre commented Sep 2, 2013

This processing sketch just takes numbers and draws lines. It is pretty well commented, but I'd have a hard time imagining what the graph looks like without running it.

If the code read five lines of text at once instead of just one, and drew five different colored lines before doing the "// make a black block to erase the previous text:" bit, then you would have five displaying.

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@lpetre lpetre commented Sep 2, 2013

Or if one single line was assumed to be five equal length sets of values, then you could graph five lines, which is easier given how the serial interface works.

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@lpetre lpetre commented Sep 2, 2013

The graph inside a circle is nice, I agree.

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@madeintaiwan madeintaiwan commented Sep 2, 2013

Strangely what happens on my laptop is if I run both the arduino and processing sketch as is, it will double up some of the "Sensors" so on the processing side I'll get double "Sensor 1" areas with one being blank and the other having data graphing but with immense lag.

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