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working snmpd.conf with ucd snmp mibs enabled

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######################################################### #####################
#
# EXAMPLE.conf:
# An example configuration file for configuring the ucd-snmp snmpd agent.
#
########################################################## #####################
#
# This file is intended to only be an example. If, however, you want
# to use it, it should be placed in /usr/share/snmp/snmpd.conf.
# When the snmpd agent starts up, this is where it will look for it.
#
# Note: This file is automatically generated from EXAMPLE.conf.def.
# Do NOT read the EXAMPLE.conf.def file! Instead, after you have run
# configure & make, and then make sure you read the EXAMPLE.conf file
# instead, as it will tailor itself to your configuration.
 
# All lines beginning with a '#' are comments and are intended for you
# to read. All other lines are configuration commands for the agent.
 
#
# PLEASE: read the snmpd.conf(5) manual page as well!
#
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# Access Control
########################################################## #####################
 
# YOU SHOULD CHANGE THE "COMMUNITY" TOKEN BELOW TO A NEW KEYWORD ONLY
# KNOWN AT YOUR SITE. YOU *MUST* CHANGE THE NETWORK TOKEN BELOW TO
# SOMETHING REFLECTING YOUR LOCAL NETWORK ADDRESS SPACE.
 
# By far, the most common question I get about the agent is "why won't
# it work?", when really it should be "how do I configure the agent to
# allow me to access it?"
#
# By default, the agent responds to the "public" community for read
# only access, if run out of the box without any configuration file in
# place. The following examples show you other ways of configuring
# the agent so that you can change the community names, and give
# yourself write access as well.
#
# The following lines change the access permissions of the agent so
# that the COMMUNITY string provides read-only access to your entire
# NETWORK (EG: 10.10.10.0/24), and read/write access to only the
# localhost (127.0.0.1, not its real ipaddress).
#
# For more information, read the FAQ as well as the snmpd.conf(5)
# manual page.
 
####
# First, map the community name (COMMUNITY) into a security name
# (local and mynetwork, depending on where the request is coming
# from):
 
# sec.name source community
com2sec local localhost public
com2sec mynetwork 10.1.1.0/28 public
 
####
# Second, map the security names into group names:
 
# sec.model sec.name
group MyRWGroup v1 local
group MyRWGroup v2c local
group MyRWGroup usm local
group MyROGroup v1 mynetwork
group MyROGroup v2c mynetwork
group MyROGroup usm mynetwork
 
####
# Third, create a view for us to let the groups have rights to:
 
# incl/excl subtree mask
view all included .1 80
 
####
# Finally, grant the 2 groups access to the 1 view with different
# write permissions:
 
# context sec.model sec.level match read write notif
access MyROGroup "" any noauth exact all none none
access MyRWGroup "" any noauth exact all all none
 
# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# System contact information
#
 
# It is also possible to set the sysContact and sysLocation system
# variables through the snmpd.conf file:
 
syslocation Right here, right now.
syscontact Me <me@somewhere.org>
 
# Example output of snmpwalk:
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost public system
# system.sysDescr.0 = "SunOS name sun4c"
# system.sysObjectID.0 = OID: enterprises.ucdavis.ucdSnmpAgent.sunos4
# system.sysUpTime.0 = Timeticks: (595637548) 68 days, 22:32:55
# system.sysContact.0 = "Me <me@somewhere.org>"
# system.sysName.0 = "name"
# system.sysLocation.0 = "Right here, right now."
# system.sysServices.0 = 72
 
 
# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# Process checks.
#
# The following are examples of how to use the agent to check for
# processes running on the host. The syntax looks something like:
#
# proc NAME [MAX=0] [MIN=0]
#
# NAME: the name of the process to check for. It must match
# exactly (ie, http will not find httpd processes).
# MAX: the maximum number allowed to be running. Defaults to 0.
# MIN: the minimum number to be running. Defaults to 0.
 
#
# Examples:
#
 
# Make sure mountd is running
proc mountd
 
# Make sure there are no more than 4 ntalkds running, but 0 is ok too.
proc ntalkd 4
 
# Make sure at least one sendmail, but less than or equal to 10 are running.
proc sendmail 10 1
 
# A snmpwalk of the process mib tree would look something like this:
#
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.3 = 3
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.1 = "mountd"
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.2 = "ntalkd"
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.3 = "sendmail"
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.3 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.2 = 4
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.3 = 10
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.3 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.3 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.1 = "No mountd process running."
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.2 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.3 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.3 = 0
#
# Note that the errorFlag for mountd is set to 1 because one is not
# running (in this case an rpc.mountd is, but thats not good enough),
# and the ErrMessage tells you what's wrong. The configuration
# imposed in the snmpd.conf file is also shown.
#
# Special Case: When the min and max numbers are both 0, it assumes
# you want a max of infinity and a min of 1.
#
 
 
# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# Executables/scripts
#
 
#
# You can also have programs run by the agent that return a single
# line of output and an exit code. Here are two examples.
#
# exec NAME PROGRAM [ARGS ...]
#
# NAME: A generic name.
# PROGRAM: The program to run. Include the path!
# ARGS: optional arguments to be passed to the program
 
# a simple hello world
exec echotest /bin/echo hello world
 
# Run a shell script containing:
#
# #!/bin/sh
# echo hello world
# echo hi there
# exit 35
#
# Note: this has been specifically commented out to prevent
# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing
# a /tmp/shtest before you do. Uncomment to use it.
#
#exec shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest
 
# Then,
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.8
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.1 = "echotest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.2 = "shelltest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.1 = "/bin/echo hello world"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.2 = "/bin/sh /tmp/shtest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.2 = 35
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.1 = "hello world."
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.2 = "hello world."
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.2 = 0
 
# Note that the second line of the /tmp/shtest shell script is cut
# off. Also note that the exit status of 35 was returned.
 
# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# disk checks
#
 
# The agent can check the amount of available disk space, and make
# sure it is above a set limit.
 
# disk PATH [MIN=DEFDISKMINIMUMSPACE]
#
# PATH: mount path to the disk in question.
# MIN: Disks with space below this value will have the Mib's errorFlag set.
# Default value = DEFDISKMINIMUMSPACE.
 
# Check the / partition and make sure it contains at least 10 megs.
 
disk / 10000
 
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.9
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskIndex.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPath.1 = "/" Hex: 2F
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskDevice.1 = "/dev/dsk/c201d6s0"
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskMinimum.1 = 10000
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskTotal.1 = 837130
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskAvail.1 = 316325
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskUsed.1 = 437092
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPercent.1 = 58
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorFlag.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorMsg.1 = ""
 
# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# load average checks
#
 
# load [1MAX=DEFMAXLOADAVE] [5MAX=DEFMAXLOADAVE] [15MAX=DEFMAXLOADAVE]
#
# 1MAX: If the 1 minute load average is above this limit at query
# time, the errorFlag will be set.
# 5MAX: Similar, but for 5 min average.
# 15MAX: Similar, but for 15 min average.
 
# Check for loads:
load 12 14 14
 
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.10
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.3 = 3
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.1 = "Load-1"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.2 = "Load-5"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.3 = "Load-15"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.1 = "0.49" Hex: 30 2E 34 39
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.2 = "0.31" Hex: 30 2E 33 31
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.3 = "0.26" Hex: 30 2E 32 36
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.1 = "12.00"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.2 = "14.00"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.3 = "14.00"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.3 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.1 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.2 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.3 = ""
 
# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# Extensible sections.
#
 
# This alleviates the multiple line output problem found in the
# previous executable mib by placing each mib in its own mib table:
 
# Run a shell script containing:
#
# #!/bin/sh
# echo hello world
# echo hi there
# exit 35
#
# Note: this has been specifically commented out to prevent
# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing
# a /tmp/shtest before you do. Uncomment to use it.
#
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50 shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest
 
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.1.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.2.1 = "shelltest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.3.1 = "/bin/sh /tmp/shtest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.100.1 = 35
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.1 = "hello world."
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.2 = "hi there."
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.102.1 = 0
 
# Now the Output has grown to two lines, and we can see the 'hi
# there.' output as the second line from our shell script.
#
# Note that you must alter the mib.txt file to be correct if you want
# the .50.* outputs above to change to reasonable text descriptions.
 
# Other ideas:
#
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.51 ps /bin/ps
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.52 top /usr/local/bin/top
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.53 mailq /usr/bin/mailq
 
# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
########################################################## #####################
# Pass through control.
#
 
# Usage:
# pass MIBOID EXEC-COMMAND
#
# This will pass total control of the mib underneath the MIBOID
# portion of the mib to the EXEC-COMMAND.
#
# Note: You'll have to change the path of the passtest script to your
# source directory or install it in the given location.
#
# Example: (see the script for details)
# (commented out here since it requires that you place the
# script in the right location. (its not installed by default))
 
# pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255 /bin/sh /usr/local/passtest
 
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = "life the universe and everything"
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.1 = 42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.2 = OID: 42.42.42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.3 = Timeticks: (363136200) 42 days, 0:42:42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.4 = IpAddress: 127.0.0.1
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.6 = Gauge: 42
#
# % snmpget -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.5
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42
#
# % snmpset -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.1 s "New string"
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = "New string"
#
 
# For specific usage information, see the man/snmpd.conf.5 manual page
# as well as the local/passtest script used in the above example.
 
########################################################## #####################
# Further Information
#
# See the snmpd.conf manual page, and the output of "snmpd -H".
# MUCH more can be done with the snmpd.conf than is shown as an
# example here.s

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