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Insanely complete Ansible playbook, showing off all the options
---
# ^^^ YAML documents must begin with the document separator "---"
#
#### Example docblock, I like to put a descriptive comment at the top of my
#### playbooks.
#
# Overview: Playbook to bootstrap a new host for configuration management.
# Applies to: production
# Description:
# Ensures that a host is configured for management with Ansible.
#
###########
#
#
# Note:
# YAML, like Python, cares about whitespace. Indent consistently throughout.
# Be aware! Unlike Python, YAML refuses to allow the tab character for
# indentation, so always use spaces.
#
# Two-space indents feel comfortable to me, but do whatever you like.
# vim:ff=unix ts=2 sw=2 ai expandtab
#
# If you're new to YAML, keep in mind that YAML documents, like XML
# documents, represent a tree-like structure of nodes and text. More
# familiar with JSON? Think of YAML as a strict and more flexible JSON
# with fewer significant characters (e.g., :, "", {}, [])
#
# The curious may read more about YAML at:
# http://www.yaml.org/spec/1.2/spec.html
#
###
# Notice the minus on the line below -- this starts the playbook's record
# in the YAML document. Only one playbook is allowed per YAML file. Indent
# the body of the playbook.
-
hosts: all
###########
# Playbook attribute: hosts
# Required: yes
# Description:
# The name of a host or group of hosts that this playbook should apply to.
#
## Example values:
# hosts: all -- applies to all hosts
# hosts: hostname -- apply ONLY to the host 'hostname'
# hosts: groupname -- apply to all hosts in groupname
# hosts: group1,group2 -- apply to hosts in group1 & group2
# hosts: group1,host1 -- mix and match hosts
# hosts: *.mars.nasa.gov wildcard matches work as expected
#
## Using a variable value for 'hosts'
#
# You can, in fact, set hosts to a variable, for example:
#
# hosts: “{{ groups }}”-- apply to all hosts specified in the variable groups
#
# This is handy for testing playbooks, running the same playbook against a
# staging environment before running it against production, occasional
# maintenance tasks, and other cases where you want to run the playbook
# against just a few systems rather than a whole group.
#
# If you set hosts as shown above, then you can specify which hosts to
# apply the playbook to on each run as so:
#
# ansible-playbook playbook.yml --extra-vars="groups=staging"
#
# Use --extra-vars to set variable groups to any combination of groups, hostnames,
# or wildcards just like the examples in the previous section.
#
become: True
###########
# Playbook attribute: become
# Default: False
# Required: no
# Description:
# If True, use sudo as default to run this playbook, just like passing the
# -b flag to ansible or ansible-playbook.
user: remoteuser
###########
# Playbook attribute: user
# Default: "root'
# Required: no
# Description
# Remote user to execute the playbook as
###########
# Playbook attribute: vars
# Default: none
# Required: no
# Description:
# Set configuration variables passed to templates & included playbooks
# and handlers. See below for examples.
# Tree-like structures work as expected, but be careful to surround
# the variable name with {{ }} when using. Additionally if the variable is the first thing that is called
# as an argument for an ansible module parameter. Then you need to surround the curly braces with
# double quotes.
# For example:
vars:
resource_group: dev-ops-one
session: testuser
tasks:
- name: Azure deployment with variables
Azure_rm_deployment:
state: present
resource_group_name: “{{ resource_group }}”
template_link: https://github.com/{{ session }}/
#
# For this example, “{{ resource_group }}” and {{ session }} are both usable
# variables.
########
# The following works in Ansible 0.5 and later, and will set $config_path
# "/etc/ntpd.conf" as expected.
#
# In older versions, $config_path will be set to the string "/etc/$config"
#
config: ntpd.conf
config_path: /etc/$config
########
# Variables can be set conditionally. This is actually a tiny snippet
# of Python that will get filled in and evaluated during playbook execution.
# This expressioun should always evaluate to True or False.
#
# In this playbook, this will always evaluate to False, because variable 'color'
# is set to 'brown' .
#
# When ansible interprets the following, it will first expand {{ color }} to
# 'brown' and then evaluate 'brown' == 'blue' as a Python expression.
when: color == "blue"
#####
# Builtin Variables
#
# Everything that the 'setup' module provides can be used in the
# vars section. Ansible native, Facter, and Ohai facts can all be
# used.
#
# Run the setup module to see what else you can use:
# ansible -m setup -i /path/to/hosts.ini host1
main_vhost: "{{ ansible_fqdn }}"
public_ip: "{{ ansible_eth0.ipv4.address }}"
##########
# Playbook attribute: vars_files
# Required: no
# Description:
# Specifies a list of YAML files to load variables from.
#
# Always evaluated after the 'vars' section, no matter which section
# occurs first in the playbook. Examples are below.
#
# Example YAML for a file to be included by vars_files:
#---
monitored_by: phobos.mars.nasa.gov
fish_sticks: "good with custard"
# # (END OF DOCUMENT)
#
# A 'vars' YAML file represents a list of variables. Don't use playbook
# YAML for a 'vars' file.
#
# Remove the indentation & comments of course, the '---' should be at
# the left margin in the variables file.
#
vars_files:
# Include a file from this absolute path
- /srv/ansible/vars/vars_file.yml
# Include a file from a path relative to this playbook
- vars/vars_file.yml
# By the way, variables set in 'vars' are available here.
- vars/$hostname.yml
# It's also possible to pass an array of files, in which case
# Ansible will loop over the array and include the first file that
# exists. If none exist, ansible-playbook will halt with an error.
#
# An excellent way to handle platform-specific differences.
- [ vars/$platform.yml, vars/default.yml ]
# Files in vars_files process in order, so later files can
# provide more specific configuration:
- [ vars/$host.yml ]
# Hey, but if you're doing host-specific variable files, you might
# consider setting the variable for a group in your hosts.ini and
# adding your host to that group. Just a thought.
##########
# Playbook attribute: vars_prompt
# Required: no
# Description:
# A list of variables that must be manually input each time this playbook
# runs. Used for sensitive data and also things like release numbers that
# vary on each deployment. Ansible always prompts for this value, even
# if it's passed in through the inventory or --extra-vars.
#
# Ansible will always prompt for the variables in vars_prompt, even if they're passed in via
# --extra-vars or group variables.
#
vars_prompt:
passphrase: "Please enter the passphrase for the SSL certificate"
#
# Data should not be sensitive, but something that should vary on each playbook run
# for passphrases and certificates use ansible vault or Tower database for encryption
release_version: "Please enter a release tag"
##########
# Playbook attribute: tasks
# Required: yes
# Description:
# A list of tasks to perform in this playbook.
# tasks:
##########
# The simplest task
# Each task must have a name & module name you will be using
- name: Check that the server's alive
ping:
# Ansible modules do the work!
- name: Enforce permissions on /tmp/secret
file:
path: /tmp/secret
mode: 0600
owner: root
group: root
#
# Test your parameters using:
# ansible -m <module> -a "<module parameters>"
#
# Documentation for the stock modules:
# http://ansible.github.com/modules.html
##########
# Use variables in the task!
#
# Variables expand in both name and action
- name: Paint the server {{ color }}
module: command echo {{ color }}
##########
# Trigger handlers when things change!
#
# Ansible detects when an action changes something. For example, the
# file permissions change, a file's content changed, a package was
# just installed (or removed), a user was created (or removed). When
# a change is detected, Ansible can optionally notify one or more
# Handlers. Handlers can take any action that a Task can. Most
# commonly they are used to restart a service when its configuration
# changes. See "Handlers" below for more about handlers.
#
# Handlers are called by their name, which is very human friendly.
# This will call the "Restart Apache" handler whenever 'copy' alters
# the remote httpd.conf.
- name: Update the Apache config
copy:
src: httpd.conf
dest: /etc/httpd/httpd.conf
notify: Restart Apache
# Here's how to specify more than one handler
- name: Update our app's configuration
copy:
src: myapp.conf
dest: /etc/myapp/production.conf
notify:
- Restart Apache
- Restart Redis
##########
# Include tasks from another file!
#
# Ansible can include a list of tasks from another file.
# In this example varaible user will be 'mosh'
# and variable color will be 'mauve' inside new_user.yml
- include: tasks/new_user.yml user=mosh color=mauve
# Variables expand before the include is evaluated:
- include: tasks/new_user.yml user=chris color={{ color }}
##########
# Run a task on each thing in a list!
#
# Ansible provides a simple loop facility. If 'loop' is provided for
# a task, then the task will be run once for each item in the 'loop'
# list. {{ item }} changes each time through the loop.
# if loop_control is specified you are able to change the the varaible name for {{ item }} to anything
- name: Create a file named in /tmp
yum:
name: "{{ yum_package }}"
state: latest
loop:
- httpd
- python3
loop_control:
loop_var: yum_package
##########
# Choose between files or templates!
#
# Sometimes you want to choose between local files depending on the
# value of the variable. first_found plugin checks for each file
# and, if the file exists calls the action with item={{filename}}.
#
# Mostly useful for 'template' and 'copy' actions. Only examines local
# files.
#
- name: Template a file
template:
src: "{{ lookup('first_found', findme)}}"
dest: /etc/myapp/foo.conf
vars:
findme:
- templates/myapp/${ansible_distribution}.conf
- templates/myapp/default.conf
##########
# Conditionally execute tasks!
#
# Sometimes you only want to run an action when a under certain conditions.
# In Ansible use 'when' as a Python expression and will only run the
# action when the expression evaluates to True.
# For conditional statements(e.g. failed_when, when, that, assert) like the one below, you do not need to
# add brackets around the variables
#
#
# If you're trying to run an task only when a value changes,
# consider rewriting the task as a handler and using 'notify'
- name: "shutdown all ubuntu"
action: command /sbin/shutdown -t now
when: ansible_distribution == 'CentOS'
##########
# Notify handlers when things change!
#
# Each task can optionally have one or more handlers that get called
# when the task changes something -- creates a user, updates a file,
# etc.
#
# Handlers have human-readable names and are defined in the 'handlers'
# section of a playbook. See below for the definitions of 'Restart apache'
# when Ansible sees that a play changes something on the node it is managing and
# a handler is defined. It will run the handler once after all tasks complete in a play
tasks:
- name: update apache config
file:
src: apache.conf
dest: /etc/apache/apache.conf
notify: restart apache
handlers:
- name: restart apache
service:
name: httpd
state: restarted
##########
# Run things as other users!
#
# Each task has an optional 'become', 'become_user', and 'become_method' flag to indicate which
# user a task should run as and whether or not to escalate privileges
- name: checkout repo
git:
repo: https://github.com/some/repo.git
version: master
dest: some_destination
become: yes
become_user: some_user
become_method: sudo
##########
# Run things locally!
#
# Each task also has a 'connection' setting to control whether a local
# or remote connection is used. 'paramiko' is assumed by the command line tools.
#
# This can also be set at the top level of the playbook.
- name: create tempfile
file:
src: /myfile/location
dest: /new/file/location
connection: local
@JasonSFuller

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@JasonSFuller JasonSFuller commented Apr 23, 2020

The red is from tabs, which are not allowed in YAML.

@ogratwicklcs

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@ogratwicklcs ogratwicklcs commented Apr 23, 2020

Adjusted the spacing to get rid of the red.

@niloriver

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@niloriver niloriver commented Sep 2, 2020

Thank you so much!

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