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How to Bootcamp / Dual Boot Windows 10 on a mid-2011 iMac using USB

How to Install / Bootcamp Windows 10 on a mid-2011 iMac using USB

Apple has released support for bootcamping Windows 10, but only on 2012 Macs and later. Despite not being supported. it is possible to install Windows 10 on earlier iMacs and it seems to run quite well.

IMPORTANT: Unplug all external and physical hard drives (where possible) that you won't be installing to to avoid accidentally erasing them. Also make note of which drives and partitions remain (e.g. System and Storage hard drives), and be super careful to not erase the wrong one.

RECOVERY: If you nuke your machine, restore your time machine backup. Instructions here.

Requirements

  • A mid-2011 iMac or similar running OSX El Capitan
  • An 8GB or larger USB drive
  • An ISO containing Windows 10 (I used Windows 10 Enterprise)
  • 50GB free disk space, 100GB recommended

Step 1: Disable El Capitan's System Integrity Protection

El Capitan ships with a new OS X feature: System Integrity Protection (SIP), also known as "rootless" mode. This reduces the attack surface for malware that relies on modifying system files by preventing any user, whether with system administrator ("root") privileges or not from modifying a number of operating system directories and files.

It is necessary to disable OSX's System Integrity Protection so you can modify the Bootcamp Utility in the next step.

  1. Restart your Mac.
  2. Before OS X starts up, hold down Command-R and keep it held down until you see an Apple icon and a progress bar. Release. This boots you into Recovery.
  3. From the Utilities menu, select Terminal.
  4. At the prompt type exactly the following and then press Return: csrutil disable
  5. Terminal should display a message that SIP was disabled.
  6. From the  menu, select Restart.

Once you have finished installing Windows you should enable SIP again by following the same steps but run csrutil enable instead.

Step 2: Modify Bootcamp to allow creation of a bootable USB

For some reason Apple decided that if your Mac has an optical drive, there could be no reason you need to Bootcamp off a USB. If you're like me, you haven't touched an optical disk in a few years and prefer the ease and speed of using a USB flash drive instead.

  1. Find out your Macs Model Identifier and Boot ROM Version:
  • Open Terminal and run system_profiler SPHardwareDataType. Note down the values.
  • My mid-2011's Model Identifier was "iMac12,2" and the Boot ROM Version was "IM121.0047.B23".
  1. Open terminal and navigate to /Applications/Utilities/Boot Camp Assistant.app/Contents
  • Change directory: cd /Applications/Utilities/Boot Camp Assistant.app/Contents
  • Show files in directory: ls
  1. The file we are going to edit is the Info.plist file.
  • Make a backup of this file by running: sudo cp Info.plist Info.plist.bak
  • You will need to enter your OSX user account password.
  • If you get the error saying cp: Info.plist.bak: Operation not permitted, SIP is still enabled, please refer to step 1.
  1. Open the Info.plist in your favorite text editor, to keep this guide simple, I'll use nano.
  • sudo nano Info.plist
  1. You want to edit FOUR things:
  2. Add your Boot ROM Version to DARequiredROMVersions
  3. Delete the word "Pre" from UEFIModels and add your Model Identifier
  4. Delete the word "Pre" from USBBootSupportedModels and add your Model Identifier
  5. Remove your model from Win7OnlyModels (if it's there)
  6. Close and save the file by pressing Ctrl+x followed by y on your keyboard.
  7. The last step is to do a code sign. Boot Camp Assitant will not run if it's been edited. You need to resign it. Open Terminal (use spotlight to find it) and type this:
  • sudo codesign -fs - /Applications/Utilities/Boot\ Camp\ Assistant.app
  • It will probably ask for your password. Then it will say you need to download a developer tool from Apple. Agree to download it. (You don't need to install the whole X-Code, if it asks.) Once its been installed (it's automatic), you need to go BACK to Terminal and run that command again. This time it will work.

Step 3: Download the Bootcamp Windows Support Software

This download will contain the Windows drivers you will need to run Windows on your Mac. Windows 10 will install and run without them but not very well and a lot of hardware either won't work, or won't work very well until you install the drivers.

  1. Open Boot Camp Assistant from Applications -> Utilities
  2. Click continue at the introduction, if you completed step 2 correctly, you should see three options.
  • Create a Windows 7 or later version install disk
  • Download the latest Windows support software from Apple
  • Install Windows 7 or later version
  1. Choose none of three options, instead:
  2. From the Actions menu select Download Windows Support Software
  3. Select your Macs Desktop or Downloads folder as the destination for the download
  4. The download is 1.35GB so may take a few minutes

Step 4: Create the bootable Windows 10 USB

  1. Open Boot Camp Assistant from Applications -> Utilities
  2. Click continue at the introduction, and check the box in Create a Windows 7 or later version install disk. Ensure no other boxes are checked and click continue.
  3. If you have not already done so, insert the USB flash drive you want to burn the Windows 10 image to. Remember that any data on the USB drive you select will be erased.
  4. Continue the wizard, selecting the Windows 10 ISO file when prompted.
  5. After completing the wizard you will have your bootable Windows 10 installer USB.
  6. Copy the folder you downloaded in in Step 3 containing the Bootcamp Windows Support Software to root of USB flash drive.

Step 5: Create the bootcamp partition

You can do this using the Bootcamp Assistant, but it does reboot and attempt to boot from the optical drive as soon as it completes. I prefer to use the OSX Disk Utility instead.

  1. Open Disk Utility from Applications -> Utilities
  2. Choose your internal hard drive and select the Partition button along the top.
  3. Click the + button and create a new partition by shrinking the existing one.
  4. Create the new disk with at least 40GB disk space, I would recommend 60GB or higher.
  5. Name the partition BOOTCAMP and format using MS-DOS (FAT).
  6. Click Apply, this will take a few minutes, be patient.

Step 6: Delete the Hybrid MBR

During step 5, OSX tried to be helpful by converting our legal GPT disk partition into a hybrid MBR partition, which makes OSX see the disk as GPT and Windows it as MBR. Windows 10 requires a GPT disk when using EFI boot, so we need to revert this change using a tool called GPT fdisk (gdisk).

If this step is not completed you will get this error when installing Windows 10:

Windows cannot be installed to this disk. The selected disk is not of the GPT partition style

To avoid this:

  1. Download GPT fdisk from its Sourceforge page and install it. You will probably get a warning that it's not a signed application, if you do open OSX System Preferences -> Security and Privacy -> General and you should see a note down the bottom about the application you just tried to open with an offer to open it again.
  2. Find the device number for the internal hard disk:
  3. Open Disk Utility from Applications -> Utilities
  4. Choose your internal hard drive (not one of the partitions) and note down the Device, it's probably disk0.
  5. Open Terminal from Applications -> Utilities
  6. Launch gdisk on your internal hard disk by running sudo gdisk /dev/disk0, if your internal hard disk was not disk0 in the previous step, replace disk0 with what it was here.
  7. Type p to view the partition table to verify you're working on the correct disk. You should see the BOOTCAMP partition we created in Step 5. If not, type q to quit without saving your changes and double check the device number.
  8. Type x to enter the experts' menu.
  9. Type n to create a fresh protective MBR. Note that gdisk won't confirm a change; it'll just show you a new experts' prompt.
  10. Type w to save your changes. You'll be asked to confirm this action. Do so.

Note this action also requires OSX SIP to be disabled, if you get permission errors, make sure you have completed Step 1.

Step 7: Install Windows

  1. Reboot your Mac with the bootable Windows 10 Installer USB plugged in.
  2. Before OS X starts up, just after you hear the startup sound, repeatedly press and hold down the Option (or Alt key if your using a Windows keyboard) for a second or two until you see the boot selection options.
  3. You should see an option to boot from a USB device labelled "EFI Boot", choose this one.
  4. The Windows 10 installation will now start, follow the steps, selecting Custom Installation.
  5. On the screen where you select your partition be careful, ensure you select the "BOOTCAMP" partition you created earlier before proceeding with installation.
  6. Windows will restart 4 or so times during installation. Be ready to hold down the Options / Alt key after each reboot, but instead of selecting the USB device named "EFI Boot" select the newly created hard disk labelled the "EFI Boot" instead to ensure the installation continues smoothly. This is the same method you will use to choose between booting into OSX or booting into Windows once setup is complete.
  7. Finish installing Windows until you get to the desktop.

Step 8: Install the Bootcamp Windows Support Software

The Bootcamp Windows Support Software should be on the Windows 10 installer USB you created earlier.

  1. Open Windows Explorer and go to the USB drive
  2. Unless you renamed the folder, open WindowsSupport -> Bootcamp -> setup.exe.
  3. This will install all the required drivers and the bootcamp utility for Windows.

Step 9: Re-Enable El Capitan's System Integrity Protection

See Step 1.

Issues

The drivers installed as part of the Bootcamp Windows Support Software work well, WiFi, Graphics, External Monitors, Webcams and Bluetooth are all working. Audio was the only immediately noticable issue, though strangely the audio provided through my 2008 Apple Cinema display works without issue.

Mid-2011 iMac Audio Does Not Work

I could not get the iMac built in sound to work on Windows 10, despite the webcam working. I tried a few things that did not work:

As my external Apple Cinema display's audio was working it was not to much of an issue for me to deal with, but if anyone finds a solution please let me know.

Sources & Acknowledgements

@SONIC3D
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SONIC3D commented Apr 13, 2020

Hello, I just installed Catalina on my mac mini 2011 model. I think I can install Windows10 with out a problem via Bootcamp since Catalina will permit the compatibility. I might give it a shot. For the installation of Catalina, I used Dosdude1's patcher. Was very easy and straight forward. mit freundlichen Grüßen/ best regards/ meilleures salutations Daniel Wood Project Quality Manager/ISO 9001 auditor Handy-Nr. 0041762966360 N° portable : 0033767093273 E-Mail: Danielwoodaustralian@gmail.com

On Sun, 12 Apr 2020, 23:06 SONIC3D, @.***> wrote: @SONIC3D commented on this gist. ------------------------------ After creating install disk with rufus, it doesn't appear as a boot device. Rufus only created it in NTFS format. Have you hold Option/Alt key on boot. Your USB disk should be displayed as a bootable device named "Windows". Check my post above again. I have edited the steps for detailed operation and added images as reference. =) — You are receiving this because you commented. Reply to this email directly, view it on GitHub https://gist.github.com/8796d08d73315483c3b26e79a8e3d350#gistcomment-3251593, or unsubscribe https://github.com/notifications/unsubscribe-auth/AOF4LTC6JTVSU6MWFUM6DFDRMIUM5ANCNFSM4ISI4GWQ .

Yes. Install Mojave or Catalina is another easy way to enable install Win10 in BOOTCAMP assistant. It seems there's no additional check in it.

But based on my last attempt(install Mojave), dosdude1's patch can only patch the main OS and make it work properly. The local recovery mode(Cmd+R during boot-up) will be unable to use(A big stop sign will display if you hold Cmd+R). And the online recovery mode is still based on 10.13 High Sierra. Consider I may need to do check disk in recovery mode, using previous version of disk utility to check filesystem created by future version may cause unknown risk and I don't have TB2 cable to enable using target disk mode with another Catalina computer, I finally decide to keep using High Sierra. (And I installed Mojave/Catalina in Parallel Desktop for those Mojave only app.)

=)

@brunejer
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brunejer commented May 1, 2020

After creating install disk with rufus, it doesn't appear as a boot device. Rufus only created it in NTFS format.

Have you hold the Option/Alt key on boot? Your USB disk should be displayed as a bootable device named "Windows".
Check my post above again. I have edited the steps for detailed operation and added images as reference.
However, my installation is based on Win10 x64, not Win7 x64 as you mentioned in your above post.(Win10 is not officially supported by installing on my MacMini, either. Bootcamp Assistant has been modified followed the Step 2. But I think it's not necessary as you can use Win7 ISO to create Bootcamp partition and install USB, and after its auto restart, hold Option/Alt key on boot, when boot-up device list show on screen substitute your Win7 USB installation media by the rufus Win10 USB disk and continue the steps.)

I'm still not 100% sure if my steps are applicable to mid-2011 iMac. I just write the steps here as reference for I assuming the hardware may be similar in Boot ROM and Bootcamp processing logic, as these two models are released in the same year.

=)

Hi,
I have the same problem, I followed your steps (step 4 using rufus, step 5 using Bootacamp Assistant). But at step 7 the usb key doesn't appear on the boot menu. Neither the Windows disk as shown on your image. There are only Macintosh and Recovery disks appearing.

Any ideas ?
Thanks !

My config : Imac12,1 with High Sierra OS. Only 1 physical internal disk with two equal partitions (1 Mac, 1 Windows)

@UksusoFF
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UksusoFF commented May 26, 2020

I have the same problem, I followed your steps (step 4 using rufus, step 5 using Bootacamp Assistant). But at step 7 the usb key doesn't appear on the boot menu. Neither the Windows disk as shown on your image. There are only Macintosh and Recovery disks appearing.

Same problem. MacBook Air Late 2010.

@UksusoFF
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UksusoFF commented May 26, 2020

Success install Win 10 and video driver with @SONIC3D and Rufus.
But after plug bootable USB it's not shown in boot menu. For solve this go to macOS or boot from macOS Installation USB and type it:

diskutil list | grep Windows
sudo bless --device /dev/disk1s1 --setBoot --legacy --nextonly

It's reboot mac and try to boot from /dev/disk1s1 (your usb flash shown in diskutil list command). After you can see Windows logo and wait more time (ten minutes or more). After that it's success install video drivers from Windows Update.

Sound and other drivers can be installed via SDI. You need checkbox "Better match" and install Cirrus Logic driver instead of Realtek Sound.

@gcndubuisi
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gcndubuisi commented Jun 7, 2020

Thank you so oznu for your detailed steps to get windows 10 on an unsupported imac. I have been trying to install windows 10 on my mid 2010 mbp running Catalina Patcher in the EFI mode, without success. I stumbled onto your post while searching for answers, and like the solution you present. I would appreciate it if you could tell me if I can directly apply your solution to my MBP.

@GeoffIX
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GeoffIX commented Jun 12, 2020

Ran into the continual problem of Boot Camp Assistant (with the windows 10 mods) on Mid-2011 27" iMac running MacOS Sierra 10.12.6 failing to write the USB installer after copying exactly 4.7GB (Single layer DVD size) when using the Win10_2004_EnglishInternational_x64.iso, which is 5.27GB. Original thought was that the 16GB USB wasn't big enough, but same problem with a 32GB USB.

This seems to be a hard-wired limitation of BCA. MS advises using a Dual Layer DVD for that image. Got around the restriction with UNetBootIn.

@GeoffIX
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GeoffIX commented Jun 12, 2020

I've just found info on the issue with Boot Camp Assistant. Formatting the USB as FAT32 is the problem, as it has a filesize limit of 4GB which is not large enough for the install.wim file. Use ExFat in DiskUtility instead to overcome that issue.

@gcndubuisi
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gcndubuisi commented Jun 13, 2020

@SONIC3D
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SONIC3D commented Jun 13, 2020

Success install Win 10 and video driver with @SONIC3D and Rufus.
But after plug bootable USB it's not shown in boot menu. For solve this go to macOS or boot from macOS Installation USB and type it:

diskutil list | grep Windows
sudo bless --device /dev/disk1s1 --setBoot --legacy --nextonly

It's reboot mac and try to boot from /dev/disk1s1 (your usb flash shown in diskutil list command). After you can see Windows logo and wait more time (ten minutes or more). After that it's success install video drivers from Windows Update.

Sound and other drivers can be installed via SDI. You need checkbox "Better match" and install Cirrus Logic driver instead of Realtek Sound.

Congratulations....Glad it's working on another model.

@gcndubuisi
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gcndubuisi commented Jun 14, 2020

@PyramidUSR
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PyramidUSR commented Jul 21, 2020

thank you

@marcosrocha85
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marcosrocha85 commented Oct 15, 2020

With my disks what would be the command for gdisk? I tried on /dev/disk2 with no success. disk0 is a SSD Disk and disk1 is a default HD which comes with iMac and last disk is my Fusion Drive. Should I install Windows on disk0? I want to keep free space from my SSD.

/dev/disk0 (internal, physical):
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:      GUID_partition_scheme                        *480.1 GB   disk0
   1:                        EFI EFI                     209.7 MB   disk0s1
   2:          Apple_CoreStorage MyDisk                  479.8 GB   disk0s2
   3:                 Apple_Boot Boot OS X               134.2 MB   disk0s3

/dev/disk1 (internal, physical):
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:      GUID_partition_scheme                        *500.1 GB   disk1
   1:                        EFI EFI                     209.7 MB   disk1s1
   2:          Apple_CoreStorage MyDisk                  499.2 GB   disk1s2
   3:                 Apple_Boot Recovery HD             650.0 MB   disk1s3

/dev/disk2 (internal, virtual):
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:                  Apple_HFS Macintosh HD           +971.2 GB   disk2
                                 Logical Volume on disk1s2, disk0s2
                                 04AF1421-08E8-4E39-A91E-F446E0DF12B2
                                 Unencrypted Fusion Drive

@mrmacman65
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mrmacman65 commented Nov 13, 2020

After a long and painful experience trying to install Windows 10 on my 2011 iMac, the easiest way was the following:

  1. Install Windows 7 through the normal bootcamp process
  2. Go to the website: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 and follow the steps to create windows 10 media on usb
  3. Upgrade to windows 10 from the usb you just created.

That allowed me to upgrade in place without changing the format of the drive or partition.

@gquach
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gquach commented Dec 4, 2020

  1. You don't have DARequiredROMVersions : Remove your model from SupporedNonWin10Model

I spent an hour trying to get this to work and this comment saved me, thank you @silici0!

For anyone else who's struggling to edit the plist file and continually running into permissions problems despite having Admin privileges -- try copying the Boot Camp Assistant app to your desktop folder and then doing the edits there, then running that instance of the app. That finally worked for me on my iMac11,3 (aka iMac (27-inch, Mid 2010)), running macOS High Sierra 10.13.6.

@madmacuser
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madmacuser commented Dec 18, 2020

Thank you very much for your details how-to. I followed the information and tried to install Win 10 on my mid-2011 Mac mini but I was stuck at cd /Applications/Utilities/Boot Camp Assistant.app/Contents. I was prompted no such directory exist.

@pistoleta
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pistoleta commented Dec 23, 2020

Didn't you guys have to format BOOTCAMP partition to NTFS in the windows install menu?

@mrmacman65
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mrmacman65 commented Dec 23, 2020

I did format my BOOTCAMP partition to NTFS as part of installing Windows 7.

@madmacuser
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madmacuser commented Dec 24, 2020

Eventually, I successfully installed Windows 10 by following:-
OZNU: steps 1, 2, 3 and 9
SONIC3D: all the steps mentioned

My Windows 10 and Microsoft 365 have been running for 4 days and everything is fine. No crash at all.

@madmacuser
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madmacuser commented Dec 24, 2020

the command mentioned in Step 2 should be cd /Applications/Utilities/Boot\ Camp\ Assistant.app/Contents

@DanielWood886
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DanielWood886 commented Dec 24, 2020

@madmacuser
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madmacuser commented Dec 24, 2020

I am using Mac mini mid-2011, the exact model of SONIC3D's.

@johnhyde
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johnhyde commented Dec 25, 2020

@ibaib Thank you so much for sharing how you got it working. Following in your footsteps I was able to install Windows 10 on the main disk of my 2011 iMac, and the sound actually works! I don't think I could have done it without your help.

@scottannan
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scottannan commented Jan 30, 2021

I spent a long time working on this... my issue was that the bootable drive wasn't large enough to handle windows 10 files. This article helped: https://alexlubbock.com/bootable-windows-usb-on-mac

@tnrese
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tnrese commented Mar 29, 2021

I couldn’t find the DArequiredROMVersions in the terminal so the rest didn’t work help!

@v6668468
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v6668468 commented Sep 30, 2021

Hi guys.

Windows 10 (21H1 release) was successfully installed on a Macmini Mid-2011 under High Sierra 10.13.6 thanks for this manual. But with some difference.

Step 1. no difference

Step 2. no difference

Step 2. No "DARequiredROMVersions" settings needed in Info.plist.
Also removed my Macmini5,1 model from SupporedNonWin10Models key.

Step 3. no difference

Step 4. Described way doesn't work since the latest iso's of Windows 10 contain install.wim file larger than 4Gb, so Bootcamp can't write it on FAT32 FS with "No enough space on startup disk" error. People says that Apple has already fixed the problem and use exFAT in the latest versions of Bootcamp, but in my case with High Sierra it still uses FAT32. So I had to use this manual https://twocanoes.com/using-larger-windows-10-isos-with-boot-camp-assistant/ and Boot Camp ISO converter utility to repack the original M$ iso file splitting install.wim file.
https://twocanoes-software-updates.s3.amazonaws.com/Boot%20Camp%20ISO%20Converter1_6.dmg
The utility is claimed as paid, but now it's discontinued and costs $0, so you can go through "buying" procedure and get an activation key for free. Evaluation way works as well (if you prefer) :)
Now this step works perfectly.
Alternatively you can install older Windows 10 releases and then upgrade Windows to the lates release using its own update system. I tested with 2004 release without repack. It works, but Windows doesn't upgrade itself to the latest 21H1 release so I had to get back to the "iso splitting way".

Step 5. Created bootcamp partition using the native way. Run Bootcamp and chosen the only option: "Install Windows 7 or later version". It has initiated partition creation and then rebooted Mac to windows installation process. No additional actions were needed.
Note: if you reboot to installation process manually (holding "Option" button after Mac is turned on), then you'll see 3 boot options

  1. Macintosh HD (regular macos)
  2. Windows (from your USB device)
  3. EFI boot (from your USB device)
    You must choose option 2 - Windows. EFI boot didn't work in my case and gets stuck on windows logo. Option 2 shows a message "Booting from Bootcamp created disk" (or somehow so, can't see the original message any more), then blinking cursor for about a minute (keep calm and be patient) and then installation process starts.

Step 6. skipped.

Step 7. During Installation process there was no necessity to catch reboot moments and choose Windows boot. It always reboots in Windows.

Step 8. After drivers installation all the devices work out of the box. Even my Monitor audio via HDMI cable. No issues, no additional troubleshooting.

Faced an issue with Bootcamp helper utility under Windows. The feature "reboot to macos" doesn't work. It always boots back to Windows. You have to use hold "Option" button during boot to get to boot manager menu and choose Macintosh HD way manually.

Have fun!

@Ibraadin10
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Ibraadin10 commented Oct 3, 2021

Guys I have a quick question, I followed all steps but is it normal after I installed windows on the windows Menu in the first Settings my iMac mid 2011 restarts and I get only the windows screen, nothing is loading or giving me a sign that it works. I’ll post a pictures underneath pls help :)!
Uploading image.jpg…

@koller18
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koller18 commented Oct 5, 2021

The problem with sound and other devices is solved here!

@mwasking
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mwasking commented Nov 27, 2021

best and easiest guide

I got stuck at the last step. When I reboot and try to select the Bootcamp disk for windows, the screen freezes and doesn't proceed.

@Padremedia
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Padremedia commented Dec 27, 2021

Hi guys.

Windows 10 Professional was successfully installed on a iMac Mid-2011 under High Sierra 10.13.6.
All drives works including graphics and audio like normal win10..

this is how i did it: (you must have a original windows 10 product key to complete. thats all)

  1. Install Windows 7 through the normal bootcamp process
  2. Install the bootcam files too and connect to the internet
  3. Go to the website: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 and follow the steps to create windows 10
  4. When prompted choose: upgrade this computer
  5. When prompted give your windows 10 key
  6. the computer will restart atleast four times, hold your Cmd/Alt key according to your keyboard and choose 'windows'
  7. it will take maximum of an hour ...you will see the noram windows 10 desktop.
  8. after that , windows will automattically downlaod drivers required for windows like audio and vga...

100% success...no coding nothing...just sit back and relax.....(frshanadu@gmail.com)

That allowed me to upgrade in place without changing the format of the drive or partition.

@macamir
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macamir commented Feb 12, 2022

Hi, I downloaded iso file from MS website for installing on my iMac mid 2011(12,1) but when I am trying to create bootable drive bootcamp keeps giving error message "There is not enough space available on the disk."... tried with different usb drives still the same... can someone help here please?
Also I have 2 hard drives in my mac so installing it on seperate hard drive than my macOS High Sierra so do I need to still format to create GUID partition? thanks

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