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Basic Magento Redis Configuration
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!--
/**
* Magento Enterprise Edition
*
* NOTICE OF LICENSE
*
* This source file is subject to the Magento Enterprise Edition End User License Agreement
* that is bundled with this package in the file LICENSE_EE.txt.
* It is also available through the world-wide-web at this URL:
* http://www.magento.com/license/enterprise-edition
* If you did not receive a copy of the license and are unable to
* obtain it through the world-wide-web, please send an email
* to license@magento.com so we can send you a copy immediately.
*
* DISCLAIMER
*
* Do not edit or add to this file if you wish to upgrade Magento to newer
* versions in the future. If you wish to customize Magento for your
* needs please refer to http://www.magento.com for more information.
*
* @category Mage
* @package Mage_Core
* @copyright Copyright (c) 2006-2015 X.commerce, Inc. (http://www.magento.com)
* @license http://www.magento.com/license/enterprise-edition
*/
-->
<config>
<global>
<install>
<date><![CDATA[Thu, 1 Jan 2015 12:00:00 +0000]]></date>
</install>
<crypt>
<key><![CDATA[12345678900987654321]]></key>
</crypt>
<disable_local_modules>false</disable_local_modules>
<resources>
<db>
<table_prefix><![CDATA[]]></table_prefix>
</db>
<default_setup>
<connection>
<host><![CDATA[127.0.0.1]]></host>
<username><![CDATA[production_user]]></username>
<password><![CDATA[$eCR3t]]></password>
<dbname><![CDATA[magento_production]]></dbname>
<initStatements><![CDATA[SET NAMES utf8]]></initStatements>
<model><![CDATA[mysql4]]></model>
<type><![CDATA[pdo_mysql]]></type>
<pdoType><![CDATA[]]></pdoType>
<active>1</active>
</connection>
</default_setup>
</resources>
<session_save>db</session_save>
<redis_session>
<host>127.0.0.1</host>
<port>6379</port>
<password></password>
<timeout>2.5</timeout>
<persistent></persistent>
<db>0</db>
<compression_threshold>2048</compression_threshold>
<compression_lib>gzip</compression_lib>
<log_level>1</log_level>
<max_concurrency>6</max_concurrency>
<break_after_frontend>5</break_after_frontend>
<break_after_adminhtml>30</break_after_adminhtml>
<first_lifetime>600</first_lifetime>
<bot_first_lifetime>60</bot_first_lifetime>
<bot_lifetime>7200</bot_lifetime>
<disable_locking>0</disable_locking>
<min_lifetime>60</min_lifetime>
<max_lifetime>2592000</max_lifetime>
</redis_session>
<cache>
<backend>Cm_Cache_Backend_Redis</backend>
<backend_options>
<server>127.0.0.1</server>
<port>6380</port>
<persistent></persistent>
<database>0</database>
<password></password>
<force_standalone>0</force_standalone>
<connect_retries>2</connect_retries>
<read_timeout>10</read_timeout>
<automatic_cleaning_factor>0</automatic_cleaning_factor>
<compress_data>1</compress_data>
<compress_tags>1</compress_tags>
<compress_threshold>20480</compress_threshold>
<compression_lib>gzip</compression_lib>
<use_lua>0</use_lua>
</backend_options>
</cache>
<full_page_cache>
<backend>Cm_Cache_Backend_Redis</backend>
<backend_options>
<server>127.0.0.1</server>
<port>6381</port>
<persistent></persistent>
<database>0</database>
<password></password>
<force_standalone>0</force_standalone>
<connect_retries>2</connect_retries>
<lifetimelimit>57600</lifetimelimit>
<compress_data>0</compress_data>
</backend_options>
</full_page_cache>
</global>
<admin>
<routers>
<adminhtml>
<args>
<frontName><![CDATA[manage]]></frontName>
</args>
</adminhtml>
</routers>
</admin>
<!-- Disable the logging observers from running -->
<frontend>
<events>
<controller_action_predispatch>
<observers><log><type>disabled</type></log></observers>
</controller_action_predispatch>
<controller_action_postdispatch>
<observers><log><type>disabled</type></log></observers>
</controller_action_postdispatch>
<sales_quote_save_after>
<observers><log><type>disabled</type></log></observers>
</sales_quote_save_after>
<checkout_quote_destroy>
<observers><log><type>disabled</type></log></observers>
</checkout_quote_destroy>
</events>
</frontend>
</config>
# Redis Magento cache configuration file
################################## INCLUDES ###################################
# Include one or more other config files here. This is useful if you
# have a standard template that goes to all Redis servers but also need
# to customize a few per-server settings. Include files can include
# other files, so use this wisely.
#
# include /path/to/local.conf
# include /path/to/other.conf
################################ GENERAL #####################################
# By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
# Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
daemonize yes
# When running daemonized, Redis writes a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by
# default. You can specify a custom pid file location here.
pidfile /var/run/redis/redis-cache.pid
# Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379.
# If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
port 6380
# TCP listen() backlog.
tcp-backlog 511
# By default Redis listens for connections from all the network interfaces
# available on the server. It is possible to listen to just one or multiple
# interfaces using the "bind" configuration directive, followed by one or
# more IP addresses.
bind 127.0.0.1
# Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
timeout 0
# TCP keepalive.
tcp-keepalive 25
# Specify the server verbosity level.
loglevel notice
# Specify the log file name. Also the empty string can be used to force
# Redis to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard
# output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
logfile /var/log/redis/redis-cache.log
# Set the number of databases.
databases 16
################################ SNAPSHOTTING ################################
# Disabled write to disk for cache data
# save 900 1
# save 300 10
# save 60 10000
# By default Redis will stop accepting writes if RDB snapshots are enabled
# (at least one save point) and the latest background save failed.
# This will make the user aware (in a hard way) that data is not persisting
# on disk properly, otherwise chances are that no one will notice and some
# disaster will happen.
stop-writes-on-bgsave-error yes
# Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases?
# For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win.
# If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but
# the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
rdbcompression yes
# Since version 5 of RDB a CRC64 checksum is placed at the end of the file.
# This makes the format more resistant to corruption but there is a performance
# hit to pay (around 10%) when saving and loading RDB files, so you can disable it
# for maximum performances.
rdbchecksum yes
# The filename where to dump the DB
dbfilename dump-cache.rdb
# The working directory.
dir /var/lib/redis/
################################# REPLICATION #################################
# When a slave loses its connection with the master, or when the replication
# is still in progress, the slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'yes' (the default)
# the slave will still reply to client requests, possibly with out of date data,
# or the data set may just be empty if this is the first synchronization.
slave-serve-stale-data yes
# You can configure a slave instance to accept writes or not. Writing against
# a slave instance may be useful to store some ephemeral data (because data
# written on a slave will be easily deleted after resync with the master) but
# may also cause problems if clients are writing to it because of a
# misconfiguration.
slave-read-only yes
# Replication SYNC strategy: disk or socket.
repl-diskless-sync no
# When diskless replication is enabled, it is possible to configure the delay
# the server waits in order to spawn the child that trnasfers the RDB via socket
# to the slaves.
repl-diskless-sync-delay 5
# Disable TCP_NODELAY on the slave socket after SYNC?
repl-disable-tcp-nodelay no
# The slave priority is an integer number published by Redis in the INFO output.
# It is used by Redis Sentinel in order to select a slave to promote into a
# master if the master is no longer working correctly.
slave-priority 100
################################### LIMITS ####################################
# Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes.
# When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys
# according to the eviction policy selected (see maxmemory-policy).
maxmemory 1gb
############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################
# By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. This mode is
# good enough in many applications, but an issue with the Redis process or
# a power outage may result into a few minutes of writes lost (depending on
# the configured save points).
#
# The Append Only File is an alternative persistence mode that provides
# much better durability. For instance using the default data fsync policy
# (see later in the config file) Redis can lose just one second of writes in a
# dramatic event like a server power outage, or a single write if something
# wrong with the Redis process itself happens, but the operating system is
# still running correctly.
appendonly no
# The name of the append only file.
appendfilename "appendonly-cache.aof"
# The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
# instead of waiting for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush
# data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
appendfsync everysec
# When the AOF fsync policy is set to always or everysec, and a background
# saving process (a background save or AOF log background rewriting) is
# performing a lot of I/O against the disk, in some Linux configurations
# Redis may block too long on the fsync() call. Note that there is no fix for
# this currently, as even performing fsync in a different thread will block
# our synchronous write(2) call.
no-appendfsync-on-rewrite no
# Automatic rewrite of the append only file.
# Redis is able to automatically rewrite the log file implicitly calling
# BGREWRITEAOF when the AOF log size grows by the specified percentage.
auto-aof-rewrite-percentage 100
auto-aof-rewrite-min-size 64mb
# An AOF file may be found to be truncated at the end during the Redis
# startup process, when the AOF data gets loaded back into memory.
# This may happen when the system where Redis is running
# crashes, especially when an ext4 filesystem is mounted without the
# data=ordered option (however this can't happen when Redis itself
# crashes or aborts but the operating system still works correctly).
aof-load-truncated yes
################################ LUA SCRIPTING ###############################
# Max execution time of a Lua script in milliseconds.
#
# If the maximum execution time is reached Redis will log that a script is
# still in execution after the maximum allowed time and will start to
# reply to queries with an error.
lua-time-limit 5000
################################## SLOW LOG ###################################
# The Redis Slow Log is a system to log queries that exceeded a specified
# execution time. The execution time does not include the I/O operations
# like talking with the client, sending the reply and so forth,
# but just the time needed to actually execute the command (this is the only
# stage of command execution where the thread is blocked and can not serve
# other requests in the meantime).
# The following time is expressed in microseconds, so 1000000 is equivalent
# to one second. Note that a negative number disables the slow log, while
# a value of zero forces the logging of every command.
slowlog-log-slower-than 10000
# There is no limit to this length. Just be aware that it will consume memory.
# You can reclaim memory used by the slow log with SLOWLOG RESET.
slowlog-max-len 128
################################ LATENCY MONITOR ##############################
# The Redis latency monitoring subsystem samples different operations
# at runtime in order to collect data related to possible sources of
# latency of a Redis instance.
latency-monitor-threshold 0
############################# Event notification ##############################
# Redis can notify Pub/Sub clients about events happening in the key space.
# This feature is documented at http://redis.io/topics/notifications
notify-keyspace-events ""
############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################
# Hashes are encoded using a memory efficient data structure when they have a
# small number of entries, and the biggest entry does not exceed a given
# threshold. These thresholds can be configured using the following directives.
hash-max-ziplist-entries 512
hash-max-ziplist-value 64
# Similarly to hashes, small lists are also encoded in a special way in order
# to save a lot of space. The special representation is only used when
# you are under the following limits:
list-max-ziplist-entries 512
list-max-ziplist-value 64
# Sets have a special encoding in just one case: when a set is composed
# of just strings that happen to be integers in radix 10 in the range
# of 64 bit signed integers.
# The following configuration setting sets the limit in the size of the
# set in order to use this special memory saving encoding.
set-max-intset-entries 512
# Similarly to hashes and lists, sorted sets are also specially encoded in
# order to save a lot of space. This encoding is only used when the length and
# elements of a sorted set are below the following limits:
zset-max-ziplist-entries 128
zset-max-ziplist-value 64
# HyperLogLog sparse representation bytes limit. The limit includes the
# 16 bytes header. When an HyperLogLog using the sparse representation crosses
# this limit, it is converted into the dense representation.
hll-sparse-max-bytes 3000
# Active rehashing uses 1 millisecond every 100 milliseconds of CPU time in
# order to help rehashing the main Redis hash table (the one mapping top-level
# keys to values). The hash table implementation Redis uses (see dict.c)
# performs a lazy rehashing: the more operation you run into a hash table
# that is rehashing, the more rehashing "steps" are performed, so if the
# server is idle the rehashing is never complete and some more memory is used
# by the hash table.
activerehashing yes
# The client output buffer limits can be used to force disconnection of clients
# that are not reading data from the server fast enough for some reason (a
# common reason is that a Pub/Sub client can't consume messages as fast as the
# publisher can produce them).
client-output-buffer-limit normal 0 0 0
client-output-buffer-limit slave 256mb 64mb 60
client-output-buffer-limit pubsub 32mb 8mb 60
# Redis calls an internal function to perform many background tasks, like
# closing connections of clients in timeout, purging expired keys that are
# never requested, and so forth.
hz 50
# When a child rewrites the AOF file, if the following option is enabled
# the file will be fsync-ed every 32 MB of data generated. This is useful
# in order to commit the file to the disk more incrementally and avoid
# big latency spikes.
aof-rewrite-incremental-fsync yes
# Redis Magento full page cache configuration file
################################## INCLUDES ###################################
# Include one or more other config files here. This is useful if you
# have a standard template that goes to all Redis servers but also need
# to customize a few per-server settings. Include files can include
# other files, so use this wisely.
#
# include /path/to/local.conf
# include /path/to/other.conf
################################ GENERAL #####################################
# By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
# Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
daemonize yes
# When running daemonized, Redis writes a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by
# default. You can specify a custom pid file location here.
pidfile /var/run/redis/redis-fpc.pid
# Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379.
# If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
port 6381
# TCP listen() backlog.
tcp-backlog 511
# By default Redis listens for connections from all the network interfaces
# available on the server. It is possible to listen to just one or multiple
# interfaces using the "bind" configuration directive, followed by one or
# more IP addresses.
bind 127.0.0.1
# Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
timeout 0
# TCP keepalive.
tcp-keepalive 25
# Specify the server verbosity level.
loglevel notice
# Specify the log file name. Also the empty string can be used to force
# Redis to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard
# output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
logfile /var/log/redis/redis-fpc.log
# Set the number of databases.
databases 16
################################ SNAPSHOTTING ################################
# Disabled write to disk for cache data
# save 900 1
# save 300 10
# save 60 10000
# By default Redis will stop accepting writes if RDB snapshots are enabled
# (at least one save point) and the latest background save failed.
# This will make the user aware (in a hard way) that data is not persisting
# on disk properly, otherwise chances are that no one will notice and some
# disaster will happen.
stop-writes-on-bgsave-error yes
# Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases?
# For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win.
# If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but
# the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
rdbcompression yes
# Since version 5 of RDB a CRC64 checksum is placed at the end of the file.
# This makes the format more resistant to corruption but there is a performance
# hit to pay (around 10%) when saving and loading RDB files, so you can disable it
# for maximum performances.
rdbchecksum yes
# The filename where to dump the DB
dbfilename dump-fpc.rdb
# The working directory.
dir /var/lib/redis/
################################# REPLICATION #################################
# When a slave loses its connection with the master, or when the replication
# is still in progress, the slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'yes' (the default)
# the slave will still reply to client requests, possibly with out of date data,
# or the data set may just be empty if this is the first synchronization.
slave-serve-stale-data yes
# You can configure a slave instance to accept writes or not. Writing against
# a slave instance may be useful to store some ephemeral data (because data
# written on a slave will be easily deleted after resync with the master) but
# may also cause problems if clients are writing to it because of a
# misconfiguration.
slave-read-only yes
# Replication SYNC strategy: disk or socket.
repl-diskless-sync no
# When diskless replication is enabled, it is possible to configure the delay
# the server waits in order to spawn the child that trnasfers the RDB via socket
# to the slaves.
repl-diskless-sync-delay 5
# Disable TCP_NODELAY on the slave socket after SYNC?
repl-disable-tcp-nodelay no
# The slave priority is an integer number published by Redis in the INFO output.
# It is used by Redis Sentinel in order to select a slave to promote into a
# master if the master is no longer working correctly.
slave-priority 100
################################### LIMITS ####################################
# Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes.
# When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys
# according to the eviction policy selected (see maxmemory-policy).
maxmemory 1gb
############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################
# By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. This mode is
# good enough in many applications, but an issue with the Redis process or
# a power outage may result into a few minutes of writes lost (depending on
# the configured save points).
#
# The Append Only File is an alternative persistence mode that provides
# much better durability. For instance using the default data fsync policy
# (see later in the config file) Redis can lose just one second of writes in a
# dramatic event like a server power outage, or a single write if something
# wrong with the Redis process itself happens, but the operating system is
# still running correctly.
appendonly no
# The name of the append only file.
appendfilename "appendonly-fpc.aof"
# The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
# instead of waiting for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush
# data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
appendfsync everysec
# When the AOF fsync policy is set to always or everysec, and a background
# saving process (a background save or AOF log background rewriting) is
# performing a lot of I/O against the disk, in some Linux configurations
# Redis may block too long on the fsync() call. Note that there is no fix for
# this currently, as even performing fsync in a different thread will block
# our synchronous write(2) call.
no-appendfsync-on-rewrite no
# Automatic rewrite of the append only file.
# Redis is able to automatically rewrite the log file implicitly calling
# BGREWRITEAOF when the AOF log size grows by the specified percentage.
auto-aof-rewrite-percentage 100
auto-aof-rewrite-min-size 64mb
# An AOF file may be found to be truncated at the end during the Redis
# startup process, when the AOF data gets loaded back into memory.
# This may happen when the system where Redis is running
# crashes, especially when an ext4 filesystem is mounted without the
# data=ordered option (however this can't happen when Redis itself
# crashes or aborts but the operating system still works correctly).
aof-load-truncated yes
################################ LUA SCRIPTING ###############################
# Max execution time of a Lua script in milliseconds.
#
# If the maximum execution time is reached Redis will log that a script is
# still in execution after the maximum allowed time and will start to
# reply to queries with an error.
lua-time-limit 5000
################################## SLOW LOG ###################################
# The Redis Slow Log is a system to log queries that exceeded a specified
# execution time. The execution time does not include the I/O operations
# like talking with the client, sending the reply and so forth,
# but just the time needed to actually execute the command (this is the only
# stage of command execution where the thread is blocked and can not serve
# other requests in the meantime).
# The following time is expressed in microseconds, so 1000000 is equivalent
# to one second. Note that a negative number disables the slow log, while
# a value of zero forces the logging of every command.
slowlog-log-slower-than 10000
# There is no limit to this length. Just be aware that it will consume memory.
# You can reclaim memory used by the slow log with SLOWLOG RESET.
slowlog-max-len 128
################################ LATENCY MONITOR ##############################
# The Redis latency monitoring subsystem samples different operations
# at runtime in order to collect data related to possible sources of
# latency of a Redis instance.
latency-monitor-threshold 0
############################# Event notification ##############################
# Redis can notify Pub/Sub clients about events happening in the key space.
# This feature is documented at http://redis.io/topics/notifications
notify-keyspace-events ""
############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################
# Hashes are encoded using a memory efficient data structure when they have a
# small number of entries, and the biggest entry does not exceed a given
# threshold. These thresholds can be configured using the following directives.
hash-max-ziplist-entries 512
hash-max-ziplist-value 64
# Similarly to hashes, small lists are also encoded in a special way in order
# to save a lot of space. The special representation is only used when
# you are under the following limits:
list-max-ziplist-entries 512
list-max-ziplist-value 64
# Sets have a special encoding in just one case: when a set is composed
# of just strings that happen to be integers in radix 10 in the range
# of 64 bit signed integers.
# The following configuration setting sets the limit in the size of the
# set in order to use this special memory saving encoding.
set-max-intset-entries 512
# Similarly to hashes and lists, sorted sets are also specially encoded in
# order to save a lot of space. This encoding is only used when the length and
# elements of a sorted set are below the following limits:
zset-max-ziplist-entries 128
zset-max-ziplist-value 64
# HyperLogLog sparse representation bytes limit. The limit includes the
# 16 bytes header. When an HyperLogLog using the sparse representation crosses
# this limit, it is converted into the dense representation.
hll-sparse-max-bytes 3000
# Active rehashing uses 1 millisecond every 100 milliseconds of CPU time in
# order to help rehashing the main Redis hash table (the one mapping top-level
# keys to values). The hash table implementation Redis uses (see dict.c)
# performs a lazy rehashing: the more operation you run into a hash table
# that is rehashing, the more rehashing "steps" are performed, so if the
# server is idle the rehashing is never complete and some more memory is used
# by the hash table.
activerehashing yes
# The client output buffer limits can be used to force disconnection of clients
# that are not reading data from the server fast enough for some reason (a
# common reason is that a Pub/Sub client can't consume messages as fast as the
# publisher can produce them).
client-output-buffer-limit normal 0 0 0
client-output-buffer-limit slave 256mb 64mb 60
client-output-buffer-limit pubsub 32mb 8mb 60
# Redis calls an internal function to perform many background tasks, like
# closing connections of clients in timeout, purging expired keys that are
# never requested, and so forth.
hz 50
# When a child rewrites the AOF file, if the following option is enabled
# the file will be fsync-ed every 32 MB of data generated. This is useful
# in order to commit the file to the disk more incrementally and avoid
# big latency spikes.
aof-rewrite-incremental-fsync yes
# Redis Magento session configuration file
################################## INCLUDES ###################################
# Include one or more other config files here. This is useful if you
# have a standard template that goes to all Redis servers but also need
# to customize a few per-server settings. Include files can include
# other files, so use this wisely.
#
# include /path/to/local.conf
# include /path/to/other.conf
################################ GENERAL #####################################
# By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
# Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
daemonize yes
# When running daemonized, Redis writes a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by
# default. You can specify a custom pid file location here.
pidfile /var/run/redis/redis.pid
# Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379.
# If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
port 6379
# TCP listen() backlog.
tcp-backlog 511
# By default Redis listens for connections from all the network interfaces
# available on the server. It is possible to listen to just one or multiple
# interfaces using the "bind" configuration directive, followed by one or
# more IP addresses.
bind 127.0.0.1
# Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
timeout 0
# TCP keepalive.
tcp-keepalive 25
# Specify the server verbosity level.
loglevel notice
# Specify the log file name. Also the empty string can be used to force
# Redis to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard
# output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
logfile /var/log/redis/redis.log
# Set the number of databases.
databases 16
################################ SNAPSHOTTING ################################
save 900 1
save 300 10
save 60 10000
# By default Redis will stop accepting writes if RDB snapshots are enabled
# (at least one save point) and the latest background save failed.
# This will make the user aware (in a hard way) that data is not persisting
# on disk properly, otherwise chances are that no one will notice and some
# disaster will happen.
stop-writes-on-bgsave-error yes
# Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases?
# For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win.
# If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but
# the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
rdbcompression yes
# Since version 5 of RDB a CRC64 checksum is placed at the end of the file.
# This makes the format more resistant to corruption but there is a performance
# hit to pay (around 10%) when saving and loading RDB files, so you can disable it
# for maximum performances.
rdbchecksum yes
# The filename where to dump the DB
dbfilename dump.rdb
# The working directory.
dir /var/lib/redis/
################################# REPLICATION #################################
# When a slave loses its connection with the master, or when the replication
# is still in progress, the slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'yes' (the default)
# the slave will still reply to client requests, possibly with out of date data,
# or the data set may just be empty if this is the first synchronization.
slave-serve-stale-data yes
# You can configure a slave instance to accept writes or not. Writing against
# a slave instance may be useful to store some ephemeral data (because data
# written on a slave will be easily deleted after resync with the master) but
# may also cause problems if clients are writing to it because of a
# misconfiguration.
slave-read-only yes
# Replication SYNC strategy: disk or socket.
repl-diskless-sync no
# When diskless replication is enabled, it is possible to configure the delay
# the server waits in order to spawn the child that trnasfers the RDB via socket
# to the slaves.
repl-diskless-sync-delay 5
# Disable TCP_NODELAY on the slave socket after SYNC?
repl-disable-tcp-nodelay no
# The slave priority is an integer number published by Redis in the INFO output.
# It is used by Redis Sentinel in order to select a slave to promote into a
# master if the master is no longer working correctly.
slave-priority 100
################################### LIMITS ####################################
# Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes.
# When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys
# according to the eviction policy selected (see maxmemory-policy).
maxmemory 1gb
############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################
# By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. This mode is
# good enough in many applications, but an issue with the Redis process or
# a power outage may result into a few minutes of writes lost (depending on
# the configured save points).
#
# The Append Only File is an alternative persistence mode that provides
# much better durability. For instance using the default data fsync policy
# (see later in the config file) Redis can lose just one second of writes in a
# dramatic event like a server power outage, or a single write if something
# wrong with the Redis process itself happens, but the operating system is
# still running correctly.
appendonly yes
# The name of the append only file.
appendfilename "appendonly.aof"
# The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
# instead of waiting for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush
# data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
appendfsync everysec
# When the AOF fsync policy is set to always or everysec, and a background
# saving process (a background save or AOF log background rewriting) is
# performing a lot of I/O against the disk, in some Linux configurations
# Redis may block too long on the fsync() call. Note that there is no fix for
# this currently, as even performing fsync in a different thread will block
# our synchronous write(2) call.
no-appendfsync-on-rewrite no
# Automatic rewrite of the append only file.
# Redis is able to automatically rewrite the log file implicitly calling
# BGREWRITEAOF when the AOF log size grows by the specified percentage.
auto-aof-rewrite-percentage 100
auto-aof-rewrite-min-size 64mb
# An AOF file may be found to be truncated at the end during the Redis
# startup process, when the AOF data gets loaded back into memory.
# This may happen when the system where Redis is running
# crashes, especially when an ext4 filesystem is mounted without the
# data=ordered option (however this can't happen when Redis itself
# crashes or aborts but the operating system still works correctly).
aof-load-truncated yes
################################ LUA SCRIPTING ###############################
# Max execution time of a Lua script in milliseconds.
#
# If the maximum execution time is reached Redis will log that a script is
# still in execution after the maximum allowed time and will start to
# reply to queries with an error.
lua-time-limit 5000
################################## SLOW LOG ###################################
# The Redis Slow Log is a system to log queries that exceeded a specified
# execution time. The execution time does not include the I/O operations
# like talking with the client, sending the reply and so forth,
# but just the time needed to actually execute the command (this is the only
# stage of command execution where the thread is blocked and can not serve
# other requests in the meantime).
# The following time is expressed in microseconds, so 1000000 is equivalent
# to one second. Note that a negative number disables the slow log, while
# a value of zero forces the logging of every command.
slowlog-log-slower-than 10000
# There is no limit to this length. Just be aware that it will consume memory.
# You can reclaim memory used by the slow log with SLOWLOG RESET.
slowlog-max-len 128
################################ LATENCY MONITOR ##############################
# The Redis latency monitoring subsystem samples different operations
# at runtime in order to collect data related to possible sources of
# latency of a Redis instance.
latency-monitor-threshold 0
############################# Event notification ##############################
# Redis can notify Pub/Sub clients about events happening in the key space.
# This feature is documented at http://redis.io/topics/notifications
notify-keyspace-events ""
############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################
# Hashes are encoded using a memory efficient data structure when they have a
# small number of entries, and the biggest entry does not exceed a given
# threshold. These thresholds can be configured using the following directives.
hash-max-ziplist-entries 512
hash-max-ziplist-value 64
# Similarly to hashes, small lists are also encoded in a special way in order
# to save a lot of space. The special representation is only used when
# you are under the following limits:
list-max-ziplist-entries 512
list-max-ziplist-value 64
# Sets have a special encoding in just one case: when a set is composed
# of just strings that happen to be integers in radix 10 in the range
# of 64 bit signed integers.
# The following configuration setting sets the limit in the size of the
# set in order to use this special memory saving encoding.
set-max-intset-entries 512
# Similarly to hashes and lists, sorted sets are also specially encoded in
# order to save a lot of space. This encoding is only used when the length and
# elements of a sorted set are below the following limits:
zset-max-ziplist-entries 128
zset-max-ziplist-value 64
# HyperLogLog sparse representation bytes limit. The limit includes the
# 16 bytes header. When an HyperLogLog using the sparse representation crosses
# this limit, it is converted into the dense representation.
hll-sparse-max-bytes 3000
# Active rehashing uses 1 millisecond every 100 milliseconds of CPU time in
# order to help rehashing the main Redis hash table (the one mapping top-level
# keys to values). The hash table implementation Redis uses (see dict.c)
# performs a lazy rehashing: the more operation you run into a hash table
# that is rehashing, the more rehashing "steps" are performed, so if the
# server is idle the rehashing is never complete and some more memory is used
# by the hash table.
activerehashing yes
# The client output buffer limits can be used to force disconnection of clients
# that are not reading data from the server fast enough for some reason (a
# common reason is that a Pub/Sub client can't consume messages as fast as the
# publisher can produce them).
client-output-buffer-limit normal 0 0 0
client-output-buffer-limit slave 256mb 64mb 60
client-output-buffer-limit pubsub 32mb 8mb 60
# Redis calls an internal function to perform many background tasks, like
# closing connections of clients in timeout, purging expired keys that are
# never requested, and so forth.
hz 50
# When a child rewrites the AOF file, if the following option is enabled
# the file will be fsync-ed every 32 MB of data generated. This is useful
# in order to commit the file to the disk more incrementally and avoid
# big latency spikes.
aof-rewrite-incremental-fsync yes
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