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OpenWRT on x86_64

OpenWRT on x86_64

This is a very brief tutorial on getting OpenWRT installed on a regular computer, it assumes you know your way around Linux. If you find this and need additional details, please like, subscribe, and comm... oh wait this isn't youtube, just comment.

This is how I got OpenWRT going on a Mini ITX Intel DH67CF with an Intel G870 CPU with 4GB of RAM.

What You'll Need

  • 2 USB Sticks
  • Linux Live ISO
  • Latest OpenWRT combined-ext4 Image
    • As of this writing this version is 18.6.2

Use dd and create your live Linux ISO.

Format the second USB stick ext4, then gunzip the combined-ext4 image, then copy it to the USB stick.

Installation

Boot off your live Linux USB.

Insert your second USB once linux fully loads.

Use dd to write your combined-ext4 image to your hard drive.

Once dd completes, open gparted and resize the second partition to around 4GB.

Reboot removing the USB sticks.

First Boot

Grub should automatically boot to OpenWRT.

You may have to hit enter a couple of times if the boot seems to hang, it'll drop you to the command prompt and complain that there's no password.

Edit your /etc/config/network file with vi.

You'll want to modify your lan interface giving it a static IP within your network.

Here's mine for example:

config interface 'loopback'
	option ifname 'lo'
	option proto 'static'
	option ipaddr '127.0.0.1'
	option netmask '255.0.0.0'

config globals 'globals'
	option ula_prefix 'fdb0:9eff:bb07::/48'

config interface 'lan'
	option type 'bridge'
    option ifname 'eth0'
	option proto 'static'
	option ipaddr '10.10.10.222'
	option netmask '255.255.255.0'
	option gateway '10.10.10.1'
	option dns '10.10.10.1'
	option ip6assign '60'

Then do service network reload and you should be able to ping your gateway and outside the network.

You should now be able to get into the gui from any computer in the same subnet.

Configuration

Update Packages

opkg update

Packages I Use

opkg install vim-full nano usbutils pciutils

Use bash

opkg install bash

Edit /etc/passwd and change your shell to /bin/bash.

bash completion

opkg install ca-bundle ca-certificates libustream-openssl openssl-util
mkdir ~/bin
cd ~/bin
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/pjobson/bash-completion/master/bash_completion
chmod +x ~/bin/bash_completion
echo ". ~/bin/bash_completion" >> ~/.profile

Mounting

I like to have a larger /root partition and a swap.

opkg install fdisk kmod-fs-ext4 e2fsprogs swap-utils block-mount

Use fdisk -l to list your partitions.

Should show something like this:

Disk /dev/sda: 93.2 GiB, 100030242816 bytes, 195371568 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xc1e0f78c

Device     Boot    Start       End   Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1  *         512     33279     32768   16M 83 Linux
/dev/sda2          33792   8423423   8389632    4G 83 Linux

From here use fdisk /dev/sda. Create a new primary partition about the size of your RAM for your swap. Then create a secondary primary partition for your /root partition. Write the changes and do fdisk -l again. Should display something like this:

Disk /dev/sda: 93.2 GiB, 100030242816 bytes, 195371568 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xc1e0f78c

Device     Boot    Start       End   Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1  *         512     33279     32768   16M 83 Linux
/dev/sda2          33792   8423423   8389632    4G 83 Linux
/dev/sda3        8423424  16812031   8388608    4G 83 Linux
/dev/sda4       16812032 195371567 178559536 85.1G 83 Linux

Format your sda4 as ext4 with mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda4, then make your sda3 swap space with mkswap /dev/sda3 then swapon /dev/sda3.

View your memory and swap space with free -k.

Mount your sda4 to /root, mount /dev/sda4 /root.

Enable fstab with:

/etc/init.d/fstab enable

Create your fstab with

block detect > /etc/config/fstab

Edit your fstab with vi, make it look like this your UUIDs will not be all zeros.

config 'global'
  option  anon_swap '0'
  option  anon_mount  '0'
  option  auto_swap '1'
  option  auto_mount  '1'
  option  delay_root  '5'
  option  check_fs  '0'

config 'mount'
  option  target  '/mnt/sda1'
  option  uuid  '00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000'
  option  enabled '0'

config 'mount'
  option  target  '/mnt/sda2'
  option  uuid  '00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000'
  option  enabled '0'

config 'swap'
  option  uuid  '00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000'
  option  enabled '1'

config 'mount'
  option  target  '/root'
  option  uuid  '00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000'
  option  enabled '1'

Now reboot and your mount and swap should be good to go.

Adblocking

opkg install adblock luci-app-adblock

Reload luci and you should find Adblock under Services.

Setting Up Git

opkg install git git-http ca-bundle libustream-openssl wget

Generate your ssh keys.

mkdir -p ~/.ssh
dropbearkey -t rsa -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa
dropbearkey -y -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa | sed -n 2p > ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub

Add your ssh key to github.

cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub

Add to: https://github.com/settings/keys

Git will not work correctly with ssh from the server, this is the workaround.

mkdir ~/bin
cd ~/bin
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/pjobson/onion_omega2p_experiments/master/bin/ssh-git
chmod +x ssh-git

Edit your .profile and add:

export GIT_SSH=~/bin/ssh-git
export GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="USER NAME"
export GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="user@email.address"
export GIT_COMMITTER_NAME=$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME
export GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL=$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL
export PATH=~/bin:$PATH

Then source your .profile.

Now you should be able to connect to github.

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