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Range function for Decimals and floats and any other objects which supports addition
import operator
def arange(start, stop=None, step=None):
"""
Implement range function not only for integers as Python's builtin
function, but for Decimals and floats as well.
Returns generator with arithmetic progession, not list.
>>> from decimal import Decimal
>>> list(arange(10))
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> list(arange(10.))
[0., 1., 2., 3., 4., 5., 6., 7., 8., 9.]
>>> list(arange(Decimal(10)))
[Decimal(0), Decimal(1), ..., Decimal(8), Decimal(9)]
>>> list(arange(1, 11))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> list(arange(1., 11.))
[1., 2., 3., 4., 5., 6., 7., 8., 9., 10.]
>>> list(arange(Decimal(1), Decimal(11)))
[Decimal(1), Decimal(2), ..., Decimal(9), Decimal(10)]
>>> list(arange(0, 30, 5))
[0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30]
>>> list(arange(0., 3., .5))
[0, .5, 1., 1.5, 2., 2.5, 3.]
>>> list(arange(Decimal(0), Decimal(3), Decimal('0.5')))
[Decimal(0), Decimal('0.5'), ..., Decimal('2.5'), Decimal(3)]
>>> list(arange(0, 10, 3))
[0, 3, 6, 9]
>>> list(arange(0., 1., .3))
[0., .3, .6., .9]
>>> list(arange(Decimal(0), Decimal(1), Decimal('0.3')))
[Decimal(0), Decimal('0.3'), Decimal('0.6'), Decimal('0.9')]
>>> list(arange(0, -10, -1))
[0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9]
>>> list(arange(0, -10., -1.))
[0, -1., -2., -3., -4., -5., -6., -7., -8., -9.]
>>> list(arange(Decimal(0), -Decimal(10), -Decimal(1)))
[Decimal(0), -Decimal(1), ..., -Decimal(8), -Decimal(9)]
>>> list(arange(0))
[]
>>> list(arange(0.))
[]
>>> list(arange(Decimal()))
[]
>>> list(arange(1, 0))
[]
>>> list(arange(1., 0.))
[]
>>> list(arange(Decimal(1), Decimal(0)))
[]
"""
klass = type(start)
lt_func = operator.lt
stop = start if stop is None else stop
start = klass(0) if start == stop else start
step = klass(1 if step is None else step)
assert isinstance(stop, klass), (
'Start and stop limits have different types, {0!r} != {1!r}.'.
format(type(start).__name__, type(stop).__name__)
)
assert step, "Step shouldn't be a zero: {0!r}.".format(step)
if start < stop and step < 0 or start > stop and step > 0:
raise StopIteration
elif start > stop and step < 0:
lt_func = operator.gt
while lt_func(start, stop):
yield start
start += step
from decimal import Decimal
from unittest import TestCase
from arange import arange
class TestArange(TestCase):
def test_arange(self):
self.assertRaises(AssertionError, list, arange(1, 2.))
self.assertRaises(AssertionError, list, arange(1, 2, 0))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(10)), range(10))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(10.)), map(float, range(10)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(Decimal(10))), map(Decimal, range(10)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(1, 11)), range(1, 11))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(1., 11.)), map(float, range(1, 11)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(Decimal(1), Decimal(11))),
map(Decimal, range(1, 11)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(0, 30, 5)), range(0, 30, 5))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(0., 3., .5)),
map(lambda item: float(item) / 10., range(0, 30, 5)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(Decimal(), Decimal(3), Decimal('.5'))),
map(lambda item: Decimal(item) / 10, range(0, 30, 5)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(0, 10, 3)), range(0, 10, 3))
int_range = range(0, 10, 3)
for i, item in enumerate(arange(0., 1., .3)):
self.assertAlmostEqual(item, float(int_range[i]) / 10.)
self.assertEqual(list(arange(Decimal(), Decimal(1), Decimal('.3'))),
map(lambda item: Decimal(item) / 10, range(0, 10, 3)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(0, -10, -1)), range(0, -10, -1))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(0., -10., -1)),
map(float, range(0, -10, -1)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(Decimal(), -Decimal(10), -1)),
map(Decimal, range(0, -10, -1)))
self.assertEqual(list(arange(0)), [])
self.assertEqual(list(arange(0.)), [])
self.assertEqual(list(arange(Decimal())), [])
self.assertEqual(list(arange(1, 0)), [])
self.assertEqual(list(arange(1., 0.)), [])
self.assertEqual(list(arange(Decimal(1), Decimal())), [])
self.assertEqual(list(arange(1, 2, -1)), [])
self.assertEqual(list(arange(1, -1)), [])
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