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Last active Feb 5, 2021
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Setting up windows for android development with NativeScript (draft)

macOS + Android

You will need Node, NativeScript CLI (command line interface), Android Studio and a JDK (java development kit).

Android Studio is not strictly necessary — however it provides an easy to use interface for installing and managing the Android SDKs.

We recommend using Howbrew to install the required dependencies — a popular package manager for macOS.

To install Node open a Terminal and run the following command:

brew install node

To install a JDK run the following command:

brew cask install adoptopenjdk/openjdk/adoptopenjdk8

Setting up the Android development environment can be daunting if you are new to Android development, however following the next steps carefully will get you up and running in no time.

!!! Same-ish as Windows + Android! Copy here once Windows version is finalized.

Configure the ANDROID_HOME environment variable for NativeScript to be able to find the Android SDK, and add the required tools to path.

Add the following lines to your shell profile, usually ~/.bash_profile or ~/.bashrc, or if you are using zsh then ~/.zshrc config file:

export ANDROID_HOME=$HOME/Library/Android/sdk
export PATH=$PATH:$ANDROID_HOME/platform-tools

Install the NativeScript CLI globally:

npm install -g nativescript

To verify if the installation was successful, open a new Command Prompt window to ensure the new environment variables are loaded and run

ns doctor

If you see No issues were detected you have successfully set up your system.

Preparing an Android device

To run a NativeScript app, you will need an Android device — either a physical or a virtual device.

  • Using a physical device: Connect the device using a USB cable, and follow the instructions from Running on a physical device

  • Using a virtual device: Open Android Studio, and open "AVD Manager" — If you are on the welcome screen, it's under the Configure › AVD Manager dropdown, otherwise under the Tools › AVD Manager menu.

    If the list of available Virtual Devices is empty, you will need to create a new AVD. Click on "Create Virtual Device..." then pick a phone from the list. You can select any phone from the list — for example "Pixel 3 XL" and then click "Next". For the System Image select the latest version (the highest API Level in the list). If the selection is greyed out, click the "Download" link next to the Release Name to download the System Image and then click "Next" and "Finish" to create the AVD. The newly created AVD should show up in the list, and you should be able to click the green "play" button to start the virtual device.

Windows + Android

You will need Node, NativeScript CLI (command line interface), Android Studio and a JDK (java development kit).

Android Studio is not strictly necessary — however it provides an easy to use interface for installing and managing the Android SDKs.

We recommend using Chocolatey to install the required dependencies — a popular package manager for Windows.

To install Node and JDK open an Administrator Command Prompt (right click and select "Run as Administrator") and run the following command:

choco install -y nodejs.install openjdk8

Setting up the Android development environment can be daunting if you are new to Android development, however following the next steps carefully will get you up and running in no time.

Download and install Android Studio. In the installation wizard make sure to have the following components selected:

The setup may take a while, but once it has finished a welcome screen should appear.

Android Studio installs the latest Android SDK by default, which in most cases should be all that's needed to build a NativeScript app.

Configure the ANDROID_HOME environment variable for NativeScript to be able to find the Android SDK.

  1. Search for "Edit the system environment variables" in Windows Search and select
  2. Click on "Environment variables..." in the bottom corner
  3. Under the "User variables for..." click on New... to create the ANDROID_HOME user variable that points to the path of the Android SDK:

New User Variable (ANDROID_HOME)

The SDK is by default located at

%LOCALAPPDATA%\Android\Sdk

To find the actual location in the Android Studio Settings, navigate to Appearance & Behavior › System Settings › Android SDK and copy the Android SDK Location.

Add Android platform-tools to path.

  1. Search for "Edit the system environment variables" in Windows Search and select
  2. Click on "Environment variables..." in the bottom corner
  3. Under the "User variables for..." select the Path variable and click Edit...
  4. Click New and add the platform-tools path to the list.

The default location is inside the Android SDK's platform-tools folder:

%LOCALAPPDATA%\Android\Sdk\platform-tools

Install the NativeScript CLI globally:

npm install -g nativescript

To verify if the installation was successful, open a new Command Prompt window to ensure the new environment variables are loaded and run

ns doctor

If you see No issues were detected you have successfully set up your system.

Preparing an Android device

To run a NativeScript app, you will need an Android device — either a physical or a virtual device.

  • Using a physical device: Connect the device using a USB cable, and follow the instructions from Running on a physical device

  • Using a virtual device: Open Android Studio, and open "AVD Manager" — If you are on the welcome screen, it's under the Configure › AVD Manager dropdown, otherwise under the Tools › AVD Manager menu.

    If the list of available Virtual Devices is empty, you will need to create a new AVD. Click on "Create Virtual Device..." then pick a phone from the list. You can select any phone from the list — for example "Pixel 3 XL" and then click "Next". For the System Image select the latest version (the highest API Level in the list). If the selection is greyed out, click the "Download" link next to the Release Name to download the System Image and then click "Next" and "Finish" to create the AVD. The newly created AVD should show up in the list, and you should be able to click the green "play" button to start the virtual device.

@JimLynchCodes

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@JimLynchCodes JimLynchCodes commented Feb 5, 2021

ty for this ❤️

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