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In your local clone of your forked repository, you can add the original GitHub repository as a "remote". ("Remotes" are like nicknames for the URLs of repositories - origin is one, for example.) Then you can fetch all the branches from that upstream repository, and rebase your work to continue working on the upstream version. In terms of commands that might look like:

Add the remote, call it "upstream":

git remote add upstream https://github.com/whoever/whatever.git

Fetch all the branches of that remote into remote-tracking branches, such as upstream/master:

git fetch upstream

Make sure that you're on your master branch:

git checkout master

Rewrite your master branch so that any commits of yours that aren't already in upstream/master are replayed on top of that other branch:

git rebase upstream/master

If you don't want to rewrite the history of your master branch, (for example because other people may have cloned it) then you should replace the last command with git merge upstream/master. However, for making further pull requests that are as clean as possible, it's probably better to rebase.

If you've rebased your branch onto upstream/master you may need to force the push in order to push it to your own forked repository on GitHub. You'd do that with:

git push -f origin master

You only need to use the -f the first time after you've rebased.

Checkout remote branch

git clone (ssh|https)://(projectUlr).git
git pull # fetch remote branches
git checkout -b refactor/weather-forecast-feature origin/refactor/weather-forecast-feature
git checkout -b <local-branch> <remote-branch>

Checkout remote branch and track it, like dev or master.

git fetch origin
git checkout --track -b dev origin/dev

Merge with --ff-only or --no-ff

Using non fastforward or fastforward mode is a matter of preference but I like a linear history where possible so I maintain my project with --ff-only because I dont care who merged it, since I am the one who merged it.

Set new remote url

Sometimes you just clone and forget to first fork and clone, just set the new url instead like:

git remote set-url origin <url>

Delete tags

Local

git tag -d 1.0.0

Remote

git push --delete origin 1.0.0

Squash commits

<after-this-commit> should be the commit after which you will do the squash operation on. The commits you select should include the one commit you later intend to merge into ur branch. Meaning, in the rebase process you will mark every commit you wanna squash with squash except for the last commit that will be the resulting commit, which you later merge into ur branch.

git rebase -i <after-this-commit>
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