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observation-targets.json
{
"type": "observation",
"titlemainmenu": "Take Your Own Telescope Image",
"title": "Take Your Own Telescope Image",
"subtitle": "Request your own telescope observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"menuimage": "images/menu-observation.jpg",
"action": "Choose a target",
"pages": [
{
"id": "MW9",
"title": "Lagoon Nebula",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "Resembling a pool of light in the sky, the Lagoon Nebula is a giant cloud of hot hydrogen gas glowing from the intense light of newborn stars. The Lagoon Nebula, like other star-forming regions, can give us an insight into the environment that gave birth to our own Sun 5 billion years ago. What color does the Lagoon look in your OWN color image?",
"poster": "./images/targets/LagoonNebula210613052132_12_07_2021.png",
"startdate": "0220",
"enddate": "1110"
},
{
"id": "GA2",
"title": "Whirlpool Galaxy",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "A beautiful face-on spiral galaxy, the Whirlpool's spiral pattern was first seen and sketched in 1845. At first, it was unclear whether astronomers were looking at a whole city of stars a long way off, or simply one nearby star and its newly formed planetary system. The WhirlpooL has a small companion galaxy that is interacting with the larger spiral galaxy.",
"poster": "./images/targets/WhirlpoolGal210610045421_12_07_2021.png",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "GA7",
"title": "Cigar Galaxy",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "The Cigar Galaxy's (M82) distorted “starburst” shape is due to the gravity from its twin, M81. Inside dust clouds, thousands of new stars are being born. The winds generated by these white-hot new stars and old giant stars dying in supernova explosions are blowing fountains of gas out of the galaxy!",
"poster": "./images/targets/M82CigarGalaxy.png",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "SS1",
"title": "Moon",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "Your image of the Moon may be delayed a few days if the visual position of the Moon as seen from the Earth is located too close to the Sun",
"poster": "./images/targets/Moon210721044224_26_07_2021.png",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "SS7",
"title": "Sun",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "Your image of the Sun will be sent as soon as the robotic telescopes are able to observe with clear skies!",
"poster": "./images/targets/SunspotsFrame.png",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "MW1",
"title": "Hercules Star Cluster",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "Hercules cluster, also called M13, is dense ball of hundreds of thousands of stars. M13 is one of over a hundred “globular clusters” that orbit the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Globular clusters are ancient, and their 12 billion year-old stars are among the oldest in the Universe.",
"poster": "./images/targets/HerculesClus210613041830_12_07_2021.png",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "MW2",
"title": "Orion Nebula",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "The Orion nebula is an immense stellar nursery where clouds of dust and gas collapse under gravity to make the next generation of stars. It is also the closest star-forming region to us, and can be seen with the unaided eye in the constellation of Orion. Bright newborn stars at the center of the nebula make the nebula glow.",
"poster": "./images/targets/OrionNebulaGreenM210318003031_26_07_2021.png",
"startdate": "1016",
"enddate": "0401"
},
{
"id": "GA1",
"title": "Andromeda Galaxy",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "The closest large spiral galaxy, Andromeda is the sister galaxy to our Milky Way. Both are gravitationally bound to each other, and are moving closer together at 3 million miles an hour. In about four billion years time, they may collide and merge to form one super-galaxy! The Andromeda Galaxy has distinguishing dust lanes that divide the spiral arms.",
"poster": "./images/targets/andromeda_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0520",
"enddate": "0320"
},
{
"id": "GA5",
"title": "Centaurus A Galaxy",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "Centaurus A is a strange looking galaxy with a dark secret. In your OWN image of Cen A, can you find the dust lane across the face of the galaxy? This is the remnant of a spiral galaxy that collided with Centaurus A millions of years ago. The collision provided lots of gas and dust as food for a giant black hole at the center of Cen A, which is now feeding voraciously. To expose the hidden heart of this galaxy, you need a telescope that detects X-ray light.",
"poster": "./images/targets/centaurusA_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0115",
"enddate": "0615"
},
{
"id": "GA8",
"title": "Sculptor Galaxy",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "The Sculptor Galaxy is a nearby spiral galaxy, first discovered in 1783 by astronomer Caroline Herschel while she searched for comets. The true nature of the Sculptor, as a city of billions of stars, was not confirmed for another 150 years. Because it is oriented almost edge-on to us, it is difficult to make out the spiral structure.",
"poster": "./images/targets/Sculptor-ngc253_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0701",
"enddate": "0205"
},
{
"id": "MW7",
"title": "Dumbbell Nebula",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "An expanding shell of gas from a dying star that was similar to the Sun, the Dumbbell Nebula may offer a glimpse into the future of our own star. Although the Sun has five billion years of nuclear fuel left, the star that created the Dumbbell exhausted its fuel over 50,000 years ago. In its death throes, the star blew off its outer layers to form the beautiful ghostly nebula we see today. The nebula got its popular name because of a double lobe appearance.",
"poster": "./images/targets/dumbbell_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0205",
"enddate": "0110"
},
{
"id": "GA10",
"title": "Edge-on Galaxy NGC891",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "NGC 891 is a spiral galaxy seen perfectly edge-on. Our own Milky Way galaxy would probably look very similar to NGC 891 if we could move outside it and view it from the side. From our home inside the spiral arms of the Milky Way, dark, dusty clouds block our view of the galactic center. NGC 891 has a dust lane running right down the middle of the disc.",
"poster": "./images/targets/",
"startdate": "0615",
"enddate": "0415"
},
{
"id": "MW21",
"title": "Omega Centauri",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "After Edmond Halley first identified that this object wasn't a star in 1677, we now know that Omega Centauri is the largest globular star cluster in the Milky Way. Believed to be the leftover core from a separate dwarf galaxy, it contains about 10 million stars, and has a total mass of 4 million times that of our Sun. Omega Centauri is visible with the naked eye, and is about as big as the full moon in the sky.",
"poster": "./images/targets/omega_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "MW24",
"title": "Carina Nebula",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "Eta Carina is one of the largest and most interesting star systems close to our Solar System. Nearly 200 years ago, during its “Great Eruption”, Eta Carina grew to be one of the brightest objects in the sky. Although it later dimmed back below naked-eye visibility, it has been growing in brightness again since the mid-1900s. Lying deep within the Homunculus Nebula, two stars of Eta Carina are orbiting one another. There's a possibility that one of the stars of Eta Carina could explode as a supernova in the not-too-distant astronomical future.",
"poster": "./images/targets/etacarina_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "GA18",
"title": "Large Magellanic Cloud",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a galaxy. It is one of the largest galaxies in our local group, yet current measurements indicate it has only one-tenth the mass of the Milky Way. The LMC is an irregular galaxy, and like many irregular galaxies, the LMC is experiencing a very high rate of star formation. The LMC is one of our closest galactic neighbors, and is projected to collide with the Milky Way in 2.5 billion years.",
"poster": "./images/targets/lmc_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
},
{
"id": "GA19",
"title": "Small Magellanic Cloud",
"subtitle": "Request your own observation and have the image emailed to you.",
"description": "The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is a dwarf irregular galaxy. It has a bar structure at its core, so some astronomers imagine that it was once barred spiral galaxy like NGC2543. As a result of influence from the Milky Way though, the common spiral shape deformed into the irregular galaxy we see today. The SMC happens to be one of the closest galaxy neighbors to us, which also makes it one of the most distant objects that you can see from Earth with your naked eye.",
"poster": "./images/targets/smc_lg.jpg",
"startdate": "0101",
"enddate": "1231"
}
]
}
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