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A Self-Taught Course in Automated Reasoning using Haskell

Variables, Terms, and Syntactic Unification

Resources

Exercises

  1. Define a type Variable of metavariables.

    Template: data Variable = …

  2. Write a type FOOpenTerm of first-order open terms (essentially rose trees where branches represent functions and leaf nodes represent metavariables and constants, and a constant is just a 0-ary function). This type should have one type parameter: a type of function symbols.

    Template: data FOOpenTerm (fun ∷ ⋆) = …

  3. Write a new type FOTerm that is like FOOpenTerm, but parameterized over an arbitrary type of metavariables, so that you can represent closed terms by setting the parameter to Void.

    Template: data FOTerm (fun ∷ ⋆) (var ∷ ⋆) = …

  4. Write a new type HOTerm, that is like FOTerm, but it supports binder nodes, which can capture variables. Assume that each binder node can only capture one variable. The type of binders should be a parameter; for example, the lambda calculus would have data Binder = Lam as the parameter, whereas first-order logic would have data Binder = ForAll | Exists as the parameter.

    Template: data HOTerm (fun ∷ ⋆) (var ∷ ⋆) (binder ∷ ⋆) = …

  5. Redefine FOOpenTerm and FOTerm as type aliases in terms of HOTerm.

  6. Write a function that computes the set of free variables in an HOTerm.

    Template: freeVars ∷ (Ord v) ⇒ HOTerm f v b → Set v

  7. Implement capture-avoiding substitution of a single variable on HOTerms.

    Template: subst ∷ (v, HOTerm f v b) → HOTerm f v b → HOTerm f v b

  8. Implement capture-avoiding simultaneous substitution on HOTerms.

    Template: simulSubst ∷ [(v, HOTerm f v b)] → HOTerm f v b → HOTerm f v b

  9. Write a type HOSubst of substitutions in terms of HOTerm (essentially a partial function from variables to terms).

    Template: data HOSubst (fun ∷ ⋆) (var ∷ ⋆) (binder ∷ ⋆) = …

  10. Redefine simulSubst in terms of your type of substitutions.

    Template: simulSubst ∷ HOSubst f v b → HOTerm f v b → HOTerm f v b

  11. Define a type alias FOSubst of substitutions on first-order terms in terms of HOSubst.

  12. Implement syntactic matching on FOTerms.

    Template: match ∷ FOTerm f Void → FOTerm f v → Maybe (FOSubst f v)

  13. Implement syntactic unification (using the Robinson algorithm or the Martelli-Montanari algorithm) on FOTerms.

    Template: unify ∷ FOTerm f v → FOTerm f v → Maybe (FOSubst f v)

Term-Rewriting Systems

Resources:

Exercises

  1. A transition system is a pair (S, →) of a set of states S and a transition relation (→) ⊆ S². A labelled transition system is a triple (S, Λ, →) where (→) ⊆ (S × Λ × S).

    A term-rewriting system (TRS) is a transition system whose set of states is given by a set of terms, and whose transition relation is given by a set of rewrite rules, which, for our purposes, will be pairs p ↦ e where p is a pattern (FO open) term and e is an expression (FO open) term, and the set of free variables in e is a subset of the set of free variables in p.

    If (a, b) is a pair of terms in a TRS, we say that a derives b (denoted a →* b) when there exists a finite sequence of rewrites that starts at a and ends with b. In other words, →* is the reflexive-transitive closure of the relation. Similarly, the transitive closure of is denoted by →⁺.

    A pair of terms (a, b) in a TRS is joinable (denoted a ↑ b) iff there exists a term c such that a →* c and b →* c.

    A pair of terms (a, b) in a TRS is meetable iff there exists a term c such that c →* a and c →* b.

    A TRS is locally confluent if for every triple of terms (a, b, c) such that a → b and a → c, there exists a term d such that b →* d and c →* d.

    A TRS is confluent (or satisfies the Church-Rosser property) if for every triple of terms (a, b, c) such that a →* b and a →* c, there exists a term d such that b →* d and c →* d.

    Without referring to any outside resources (spoilers are easy to find), come up with a term-rewriting system that is locally confluent but not confluent.

    Extra credit: come up with a term-rewriting system that has no cycles (when thought of as a digraph) that is locally confluent but not confluent.

  2. Write a type Rule f v for first-order rewrite rules.

  3. We can apply a rewrite rule p ↦ e to a term t by unifying p with t to get a substitution θ, and then applying θ to e.

    Write a function that does this.

    Template: applyRule ∷ Rule f v → FOTerm f v → Maybe (FOTerm f v)

  4. Write a type TRS f v for first-order term-rewriting systems in terms of Rule. A term-rewriting system cannot contain the same rule twice.

  5. Write a type LTRS f v l for labelled first-order term-rewriting systems. The l parameter is for the type of labels.

  6. Rewrite TRS f v as a type alias for LTRS f v ().

  7. Write a function that computes the set of terms that are the result of applying a rewrite rule to a given term.

    Template: oneStepTRS ∷ TRS f v → FOTerm f v → Set (FOTerm f v)

  8. Generalize the oneStepTRS function to the LTRS type.

    Template: oneStepLTRS ∷ (Ord f, Ord v) ⇒ LTRS f v l → FOTerm f v → Map (FOTerm f v) l

  9. We can compute the set of terms derivable from a given term in a TRS by doing a breadth-first search using oneStepLTRS. The search may not terminate so the output should be given through a callback. The callback will take the current rule (the node in the search tree) and the list of rule labels used so far (the path from the root to the current node in the search tree).

    Template: forDerivable ∷ (Monad m) ⇒ LTRS f v l → FOTerm f v → (FOTerm f v → [l] → m a) → m ()

  10. A critical pair in a term-rewriting system is a pair of terms (t₁, t₂) such that there exists a term t for which two different applications of a rewrite rule (either the same rule applied differently, or two different rules) yield the terms t₁ and t₂.

    More precisely, to compute the set of critical pairs of a term-rewriting system, we do the following for every (not necessarily distinct) pair of rules r₁ = (p₁ ↦ e₁) and r₂ = (p₂ ↦ e₂):

    • Simultaneously (i.e.: with the same substitution) rename the variables in p₂ and e₂ so that the set of free variables of r₂ is disjoint from that of r₁.

    • For each non-variable subterm s in p₁, try unifying s with p₂. If unification succeeds, assume it returns a substitution θ (if it fails, continue on in the loop).

      Denote the application (i.e.: simultaneous substitution) of θ to a term t by θ(t).

      Define x to be θ(e₁). Define y to be the result of replacing every instance of θ(s) in θ(p₁) with θ(e₂).

      Yield the critical pair (x, y) and continue the loops.

    Implement this algorithm for the TRS type.

    Template: criticalPairs ∷ TRS f v → Set (FOTerm f v, FOTerm f v)

  11. A critical pair is convergent iff it is joinable. If all the critical pairs of a term-rewriting system are convergent, then it is locally confluent.

    Write a program, using criticalPairs and forDerivable, that automatically checks if a given term-rewriting system is locally confluent. Do not worry about the efficiency of the algorithm. It should terminate if the given term-rewriting system is strongly-normalizing, but it may not if that is not the case.

    Template: isLocallyConfluent ∷ TRS f v → Bool

  12. Implement the Knuth-Bendix completion algorithm, which computes a confluent and terminating TRS with the same deductive closure as the input TRS. The algorithm may not terminate. Try it on some simple TRSes: a theory with only ground terms (no variables), the theory of monoids of size n, the theory of groups of size n.

    Template: knuthBendix ∷ TRS f v → TRS f v

FIXME: future exercises

  • Term indexing
  • Logic programming
  • SAT solvers
    • write the type of formulae in first-order classical logic (parameterized on types for relation and function symbols)
    • write a function to convert FO formulae to negation normal form
    • write a function to convert FO formulae to conjunctive normal form using the Tseytin transformation
    • write a function to convert FO formulae to skolem normal form
    • write a simple resolution-based theorem prover for first-order classical logic
    • write a SAT solver using DPLL
    • write a type of binary decision diagrams (and associated functions and tests)
  • SMT solvers
    • extend your SAT solver with the quantifier-free theory of syntactic equality (using your unification algorithm)
    • extend your SAT solver with the quantifier-free theory of the integers
    • implement Cooper's algorithm for quantifier elimination in the theory of the integers
    • implement the Ferrante-Rackoff algorithm for quantifier elimination in the theory of the rationals
    • extend your SAT solver with the quantifier-free theory of the rationals
    • implement the Nelson-Oppen method for combining decision procedures
  • Intuitionistic type theory
    • implement an interpreter for the untyped lambda calculus
    • implement a typechecker for simply-typed lambda calculus
    • implement a typechecker for System F
    • implement a typechecker for the calculus of constructions
    • implement a typechecker for System F + automatic instantiation
    • implement a typechecker for System F + type class constraints
    • implement a typechecker for System F + quantified class constraints (link)
    • implement a typechecker for System F + row polymorphism (link)
    • implement a typechecker for System F + refinement ("liquid") types (link)
  • Substructural logic
    • implement a proof checker for intuitionistic ordered linear logic
    • implement a proof checker for intuitionistic linear logic
    • implement a proof checker for dual light affine logic (link)
    • implement a proof checker for the logic of bunched implications
    • write an automated theorem prover for intuitionistic linear logic using the inverse method without focusing (link)
    • speed up that theorem prover with focusing as described in the paper
    • write an automated theorem prover for the logic of bunched implications using the inverse method without focusing (link)
  • Hoare logic
    • all of this is explained in The Calculus of Computation
    • define a simple imperative language IMP
    • write an interpreter for IMP
    • add assert and preconditions and postconditions and loop invariant annotations to IMP
    • write a function that computes weakest precondition via symbolic execution
    • write a function that computes strongest postcondition via symbolic execution
    • write a function that computes a verification condition via symbolic execution
    • use SMT solver to automatically verify partial correctness of IMP code
    • add ranking function annotations to IMP
    • use SMT solver to automatically verify total correctness of IMP code
  • Separation logic
    • link
    • add heap allocation and separation logic annotations to IMP
    • write a type for formulae in the logic of bunched implications
    • reduce separation logic proof obligations in IMP to formulae in the logic of bunched implications
    • extend IMP with concurrency and concurrent separation logic annotations
    • write a proof checker for concurrent separation logic
  • Modal logic
    • write a tableaux prover for S4 modal logic
    • express a situation in epistemic logic
    • modal μ-calculus?
  • Temporal logic
    • write the type of formulae in linear temporal logic (LTL)
    • write a function to convert LTL formulae to negation normal form
    • write a type of Büchi automata
    • write a function to convert LTL formulae to the associated Büchi automaton
    • write a function for the intersection of Büchi automata
    • write a model checker for LTL (easy once you have done the above)
    • write a type of Kripke structures
    • write a type of formulae in computation tree logic (CTL)
    • write a model checker for CTL
  • Abstract interpretation
    • write a function that does interval abstract interpretation on IMP as described in section 12.2 of The Calculus of Computation)
    • write a function that bounds the complexity class of IMP code using an abstract domain of countable ordinals (link)
  • Higher order logic
    • implement second-order matching (link)
    • implement higher-order matching (link)
    • implement the (semidecidable and partial) DLS algorithm for reduction of second-order logic to first-order logic (link).
    • implement (semidecidable) higher order unification via Huet's algorithm as described in section 16.4 of The Handbook of Automated Reasoning.
  • Conditional term-rewriting
    • define type of conditional TRSes
    • write algorithm eliminating conditional TRSes into unconditional TRSes (link).
  • Equational unification
    • write a function to convert formulae in propositional classical logic into ring sum normal form
    • write a function to do equational unification in the theory of boolean rings
    • implement AC-unification using the algorithm that involves enumerating maximal matchings in a bipartite graph (link)
    • write a type of non-negative linear diophantine systems
    • reduce AC-unification to solving non-negative linear diophantine systems
    • implement equational/semantic unification (semidecidably) using narrowing
  • Termination and cotermination
    • implement a totality checker for STLC + a fixed point combinator using guarded recursion (link)
  • Inductive theorem proving
    • explicit induction?
    • rippling?
    • inductionless (implicit) induction?

FIXME: notes

Decidable fragments of FOL

Sources:

Summary of decidable fragments:

  • the monadic predicate calculus
  • the prefix class ∃*∀* (the "Schönfinkel-Bernays class")
  • the prefix class ∃*∀∃* (the "Ackermann class")
  • the prefix class ∃*∀²∃* without equality (the "Gödel class")
  • [∃*∀*, all, (0)]₌ (Bernays, Schönfinkel 1928)
  • [∃*∀²∃*, all, (0)] (Gödel 1932, Kalmár 1933, Schütte 1934)
  • [all, (ω), (ω)] (Löb 1967, Gurevich 1969)
  • [∃*∀∃*, all, all] (Gurevich 1973)
  • [all, (ω), (1)]₌ (Rabin 1969)
  • [∃*∀∃*, all, (1)]₌ (Shelah 1977)
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