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Script to convert SQLITE dumps into PostgreSQL compatible dumps
#! /bin/sh
usage_error () {
echo 'Usage: sh migrator.sh <path to sqlite_to_postgres.py> <path to sqlite db file> <an empty dir to output dump files>'
echo
echo 'Example:'
echo '>sh migrator.sh sqlite_to_postgres.py ~/reviewboard.db /tmp/dumps'
echo
echo 'Tested on:'
echo 'Python 2.7.3'
echo 'SQLite 3.7.9'
}
if [ ! $# -eq 3 ]
then
usage_error
exit 1
fi
if [ ! -r $1 ]
then
echo $1' is not readable.'
echo 'Please give the correct path to sqlite_to_postgres.py'
exit 1
fi
if [ ! -r $2 ]
then
echo $2' is not readable'
exit 1
fi
if [ ! -d $3 ]
then
echo $3' is not a valid directory'
exit 1
fi
#Get the list of tables
echo .tables | sqlite3 $2 > $3/lsoftbls
#Get dumps from sqlite
for i in `cat $3/lsoftbls`
do
echo 'Generating sqlite dumps for '$i
echo '.output '$3'/'$i'.dump' > $3/dumper
echo 'pragma table_info('$i');' >> $3/dumper
echo '.dump '$i >> $3/dumper
echo '.quit' >> $3/dumper
cat $3/dumper | sqlite3 $2
done
#Use the python script to convert the sqlite dumps to psql dumps
echo
echo 'Now converting the sqlite dumps into psql format...'
echo
for i in `ls -1 $3/*.dump`
do
python $1 $i
done
#Remove the sqlite3 dumps and the file 'lsoftbls'
echo
echo 'Removing temporary files..'
rm $3/*.dump
rm $3/lsoftbls
rm $3/dumper
echo 'Removing empty dump files..'
wc -l $3/*.psql | grep -w 0 | awk '{ print $NF }' | xargs rm
echo ; echo 'Done.'; echo
echo 'Please find the psql dumps at '$3
0|display_name|varchar(64)|1||0
1|name|varchar(64)|1||0
2|local_site_id|integer|0||0
3|incoming_request_count|integer|0||0
4|invite_only|bool|1||0
5|id|integer|1||1
6|mailing_list|varchar(75)|1||0
7|visible|bool|1||0
PRAGMA foreign_keys=OFF;
BEGIN TRANSACTION;
CREATE TABLE "reviews_group"("display_name" varchar(64) NOT NULL, "name" varchar(64) NOT NULL, "local_site_id" integer NULL, "incoming_request_count" integer NULL, "invite_only" bool NOT NULL, "id" integer NOT NULL UNIQUE PRIMARY KEY, "mailing_list" varchar(75) NOT NULL, "visible" bool NOT NULL);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" VALUES('Developers','developers',NULL,127,0,1,'',1);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" VALUES('Testers','testers',NULL,2,0,2,'',1);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" VALUES('QA','qa',NULL,1,0,3,'',1);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" VALUES('Release Engineers','releng',NULL,7,0,4,'',1);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" VALUES('Managers','mgrs',NULL,1,0,5,'',1);
COMMIT;
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" ("display_name", "name", "local_site_id", "incoming_request_count", "invite_only", "id", "mailing_list", "visible") VALUES('Developers','developers',NULL,127,FALSE,1,'',TRUE);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" ("display_name", "name", "local_site_id", "incoming_request_count", "invite_only", "id", "mailing_list", "visible") VALUES('Testers','testers',NULL,2,FALSE,2,'',TRUE);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" ("display_name", "name", "local_site_id", "incoming_request_count", "invite_only", "id", "mailing_list", "visible") VALUES('QA','qa',NULL,1,FALSE,3,'',TRUE);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" ("display_name", "name", "local_site_id", "incoming_request_count", "invite_only", "id", "mailing_list", "visible") VALUES('Release Engineers','releng',NULL,7,FALSE,4,'',TRUE);
INSERT INTO "reviews_group" ("display_name", "name", "local_site_id", "incoming_request_count", "invite_only", "id", "mailing_list", "visible") VALUES('Managers','mgrs',NULL,1,FALSE,5,'',TRUE);
#! /usr/bin/python
# SQLite3 uses 1 and 0 whereas PostgreSQL uses TRUE and FALSE for booleans
# This python script serves a single purpose of converting the sqlite dumps
# into postres-compatible dumps by converting the boolean values.
import random
import sys
import os.path
BOUNDARY = '%$#@!~R@ND0M^&*()_B0UND@RY<>?:'+str(int(random.random()*(10**10)))
COLUMNS = []
COLUMN_NAMES = ""
COLUMN_TYPES = ()
def usage():
'''
Print usage and exit
'''
print "Usage: ./bool_changer.py <filename.dump>"
sys.exit()
def fix_column_names(first_line):
'''
The insert statement from sqlite3 dump is as follows:
INSERT INTO "test" VALUES(1,'Hello');
We need to add the column information to the statements like this:
INSERT INTO "test" (id,name) VALUES(1,'Wibble');
This is necessary because the column orders may be different in psql db.
'''
global COLUMN_NAMES
index = first_line.index(' VALUES')
return first_line[:index] + COLUMN_NAMES + first_line[index:]
def fix_bool(stmt):
from_here = 'VALUES('
start_pos = stmt.index(from_here) + len(from_here)
cur_pos = start_pos
newstmt = stmt[:start_pos] # [INSERT ... VALUES(]
stmtlen = len(stmt)
no_of_cols = len(COLUMN_TYPES)
for i in range(0,no_of_cols):
if COLUMN_TYPES[i] == 'bool':
newstmt += stmt[start_pos:cur_pos] #nothing happens if both are same
if stmt[cur_pos] == '1': newstmt += 'TRUE'
elif stmt[cur_pos] == '0': newstmt += 'FALSE'
if i == no_of_cols-1: #i.e. last column
newstmt += ');\n'
break
newstmt += ',' #not last column
cur_pos += 2
start_pos = cur_pos
else:
if i == no_of_cols-1: #if it's the last non-bool column, then
newstmt += stmt[start_pos:] #simply insert everything that's left
break #and leave
if stmt[cur_pos] != "'":
for cur_pos in range(cur_pos+1,stmtlen):
if stmt[cur_pos] == ',':
cur_pos += 1
break #the inner loop and go to next column
else: # the 'problematic' place. cur_pos in "'"
cur_pos += 1 #what's next after "'"?
while cur_pos < stmtlen:
if stmt[cur_pos] == "'":
if stmt[cur_pos+1] == "'": #ignore escaped quote ('')
cur_pos += 2
continue #searching
elif stmt[cur_pos+1] == ",": #end of string
cur_pos += 2
break #to next column
cur_pos += 1
return newstmt
def get_psql_inserts(insert_lines):
'''
This method will get a list of one or more lines that together constitute
a single insert statement from the sqlite dump, manipulates it and
returns the list containing the psql compatible insert statement.
'''
global BOUNDARY
#First fix the column name issue.
insert_lines[0] = fix_column_names(insert_lines[0])
if 'bool' in COLUMN_TYPES:
insert_stmt = BOUNDARY.join(insert_lines)
insert_stmt = fix_bool(insert_stmt)
insert_lines = insert_stmt.split(BOUNDARY)
return insert_lines
def process_dump(input_file,output_file):
'''
Process the file lazily line by line
'''
def process_insert(insert_lines):
'''
Helper method to write psql commands into output_file
'''
psql_inserts = get_psql_inserts(insert_lines)
output_file.writelines(psql_inserts)
global COLUMNS
global COLUMN_NAMES
global COLUMN_TYPES
after_pragma = False #The first few lines will be schema info upto the
#line that starts with "PRAGMA"
insert_started = False
insert_lines = []
insert_stmt_start = 'INSERT'
for line in input_file:
#Get the schema info from the head of the dump file
if not after_pragma:
if line[0].isdigit():
COLUMNS.append(tuple(line.split('|')[1:3]))
elif line.startswith('PRAGMA'):
after_pragma = True
COLUMN_NAMES = str(tuple([name for name,datatype in COLUMNS]))
COLUMN_TYPES = tuple([datatype for name,datatype in COLUMNS])
#Python uses single quotes for enclosing a string.
#But psql uses double quotes on "column names" and
#single quotes on strings inside VALUES(..)
COLUMN_NAMES = ' ' + COLUMN_NAMES.replace("'",'"')
continue
#Ignore the lines from PRAGMA and before INSERT.
if not insert_started:
if line.startswith('CREATE TABLE'):
table_name = line[line.index('"'):]
table_name = table_name[:table_name.index('"',1)+1] # '"table_name"'
insert_stmt_start = 'INSERT INTO ' + table_name
elif line.startswith('INSERT'):
insert_started = True
else: continue
#If the control reaches here, it must mean that the first insert statement
#has appeared. But the insert statements may span multiple lines. So, we
#collect those lines and process them.
if line.startswith(insert_stmt_start):
if insert_lines: #True from 2nd insert statement
process_insert(insert_lines) #Insert the previous insert statement
insert_lines = [line] #and append the current one
elif insert_lines:
insert_lines.append(line)
if not insert_lines: return
while insert_lines[-1].endswith(';\n') and \
(insert_lines[-1].startswith('CREATE INDEX') or \
insert_lines[-1].startswith('COMMIT')):
insert_lines.pop() #remove the create index and commit lines at the end
process_insert(insert_lines) #fix the last insert statement
if __name__ == '__main__':
if len(sys.argv) != 2:
usage()
filename = sys.argv[1]
output_filename = filename + '.psql'
if not os.path.isfile(filename):
print "FATAL: Not a valid filename"
usage()
print sys.argv[0], ': Trying to convert', sys.argv[1]
try:
input_file = open(filename,'r')
output_file = open(output_filename,'w')
process_dump(input_file,output_file)
finally:
input_file.close()
output_file.close()
print sys.argv[0], ': Converted to', output_filename
print
@vigneshwaranr

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vigneshwaranr commented Aug 24, 2012

There was a bug before when the dump files had crazy sql statements like these:

INSERT INTO "reviews_comment" VALUES(0,NULL,1,'2011-09-16 01:49:22.901605','Looking at the artifact, the following query seem to be failing:

INSERT INTO etl_job (job_key, job_name, ctf_version, etl_start, etl_end, 
status) values (nextval(''etl_job_key_seq''),''scm_commit_etl'',''6.1.1.0'',''15-Sep-11'',''15-Sep-11'',''1'')

which is what InsertEtlJobSuccessRunForReports uses for both postgres & oracle. Taking an approach as in ctf541_ctf61/InsertEtlJobSuccessRunForReports.java (Revision 52402) should have fixed the issue, was that option tried?',NULL,59,6789,22103,'');

Fixed that bug :)

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vigneshwaranr commented Sep 5, 2012

If you want a psql compatible dump for a single table, then use these commands from inside the sqlite3 shell.

.output tablename.dump
pragma table_info('tablename');
.dump tablename
.quit

Then execute

python sqlite_to_postgres.py tablename.dump
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johnedstone commented Aug 31, 2013

Thank you for the sqlite3 to postgressql script.
I am migrating a django project. I appreciate you writing this. It worked perfectly!

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vigneshwaranr commented Sep 1, 2013

Thank you

@smclenithan

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smclenithan commented May 17, 2014

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "sqlite_to_postgres.py", line 180, in <module>
    process_dump(input_file,output_file)
  File "sqlite_to_postgres.py", line 137, in process_dump
    table_name = line[line.index('"'):]
ValueError: substring not found

Changed lines 136 and 137 to this:

        table_name = line[line.index('['):]
        table_name = table_name[:table_name.index(']',1)+1] 

My sqlite3 commands were not quoting the table names, instead it uses brackets. This fixes that.

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matthauck commented Aug 19, 2014

awesome. I found this actually also trying to convert a sqlite reviewboard database into postgres!

How did you know the right order to import all the separate dump files (one per table) without violating foreign key constraints?

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matthauck commented Aug 19, 2014

FYI. Found a way to do import them in the right order.

  1. Output the schema separately from sqlite
  2. Manually edit schema and keep trying to import until the order of the tables imports correctly w/o foreign key reference errors
  3. A combination of grep/sed on that schema.sql to extract out the table names in order
  4. Some more shell scripting on those table names to concatenate your various dump files into the right order

In case this is helpful to someone else...

cat schema.sql | grep "CREATE TABLE" | sed -e "s/CREATE TABLE \"//" | sed -e "s/\".*//" > table-order.txt
echo "BEGIN TRANSACTION;" > whole-dump.sql
for t in `cat table-order.txt`; do 
  cat dumps/$t.dump.sql >> whole-dump.sql
done
echo "COMMIT;" >> whole-dump.sql
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vigneshwaranr commented Sep 11, 2014

@matthauck I just disabled the constraints temporarily in a transaction. I concatenated all the sql commands into one file and wrapped the contents like the following..

begin;  

SET CONSTRAINTS ALL DEFERRED;  

<ALL DUMP COMMANDS>

commit;

Then imported this dump in one go! Make sure you test this plenty of times on backup data and setup.

Reference: http://www.openscope.net/2012/08/23/subverting-foreign-key-constraints-in-postgres-or-mysql/

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mreinsch commented Oct 1, 2014

awesome, thanks, this works great! Just one thing: You'll also probably need to reset all your sequences. For that, https://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Fixing_Sequences has a generic solution.

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azizmb commented Dec 7, 2014

This was a life saver. Thanks a lot!

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gl1tchh commented Nov 19, 2015

Just a note, I was using this to export a Grafana SQLite3 DB, ran into the same error as @smclenithan - Grafana uses backticks (`) instead of quotations marks for table names, so:

Change lines 136 and 137 to:

    table_name = line[line.index('`'):]
    table_name = table_name[:table_name.index('`',1)+1

And it works.

Cheers

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blessendor commented Jan 6, 2016

@gl1tchh and @smclenithan offers own fixes for "substring not found" error but both is useless in my case.

My environment:
SQLite version 3.8.7.1
Debian GNU/Linux 8

My sqlite3 dump exports CREATE TABLE table_name without "quotations" or backticks or any other separator:

CREATE TABLE v_users (
...
INSERT INTO "v_users" VALUES(
...

So, I check how python works with string (I'm not a programmer) and make own fix for searching tablename in the CREATE TABLE string:

  if line.startswith('CREATE TABLE'):
    table_name = line[13:]                                                                      #--modified original script line 136
    table_name = table_name[:table_name.index(' ')] # '"table_name"' #--modified original script line 137
    insert_stmt_start = 'INSERT INTO "' + table_name + '"'                   #--modified original script line 138

Explaining:
String part "CREATE TABLE" has 12 chars and with 1 white space we got a 13 characters. So our table_name located after 13 character (line 136) and before the next white space (line 137). But also we must add quotations in the line 138, because our table_name is not quoted, but 'INSERT INTO ' command must have quotations for table_name.

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