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@FluffyPira /Unemployment.md Secret
Last active Feb 5, 2016

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#On Transition and Unemployment Today marks the year anniversary since I was laid off. One year ago today, I was given my severance and told to hit the road.

It honestly wasn't that bad of a day. I talked with my co-workers, wrapped up some loose ends, had an excellent burrito at Mex-I-Can, and had some hope for the future. I had just started a publication with my partners in crime who had stable work themselves, I was going to build an excellent guitar, I'd have some time off of work to lounge around and transition in piece. It honestly looked like it was going to be a good year, but it wasn't.

Inatri started slow; honestly we were discouraged by the response to the second piece. My guitar came together but was a lot of hassle. My mental health started to change drastically come summer. My transition progress was slow and I wasn't making the gains I wanted to. Lastly, when I started to look for a job, I found nothing. Most of my responses were instant rejection, or failure to contact.

As the months dragged on, I lost hope. Where before I had looked for jobs in my field of study, now I was just looking for anything. When I thought about commuting, it felt alien and weird to me. I couldn't imagine ever feeling that normal, ever being one of the nine to five workers again. I began to feel strange and detached, like I was less than others.

##Unforgiving Job Market It's not a good time to be unemployed, especially when so many are underemployed. In Canada, youth unemployment is 13.9%, but youth underemployment was found to be 26.4%1. Admittedly these are 2013 numbers; however, the unemployment rate in Canada has been a fairly consistent ~7% with a few dips as low as ~5%2. This may not mean much to a lot of people, as the youth bracket is defined as 14-28 years old, but I am at the top end of the bracket and this experience is consistent with my friends and I.

Because of high underemployment, job opportunities that would normally be available for the unemployed are now receiving interest and applications from the underemployed. These individuals are often looking to move up from their current position or to step sideways from a similar position into a new company or environment which would offer full time or higher paid work. We are overqualified for our jobs.

The jobs I was applying for over the last year, were not jobs in my field, nor were they jobs that suit my qualifications. I am a Political Science graduate looking for mostly administrative or secretarial work. I was laid off from an administrative job in finance paying $16 an hour with no benefits and no future. I was part of that underemployment statistic.

There is also a rather worrying shift in Ontario from full-time to part-time work, which dramatically increases underemployment. Furthermore, there is a growing trend of involuntary part time work; extra jobs individuals are taking to make ends meet due to a lack of well paid full time employment3. The shifting ideas of employment in Ontario have done me no favours over the past year. Competition for full time jobs is fierce, and that will not change any time soon.

Let's be clear: I'm not applying for anything above my reach, I'm applying for entry level jobs. Most of the entry level jobs I've found have asked very clearly for experience doing that job. Most of the people I know have assured me that the experience requirement is just there to deter unconfident individuals from applying. More than once in the last year, though, I've been rejected on the basis of lacking experience.

One of these rejections was fairly recent. It was for an educational software company looking for QA testers. This is a basic entry level contract job for most developers. The required experience was one year as a QA tester. I did not have that on my CV, but I did make it clear that I have had similar experience with my former employer when our Oracle system went live and we had to create routines, test the limits of the system, and design processes as we were thrown head first into a shark tank. Seven hours later I got a rejection saying I lacked the required experience.

Whether or not my rejection was based on a different reason, the justification being used was the lack of experience. Lack of experience for an entry level job that, in essence, should require little to no experience but rather job training and mentoring. However, with a job market so glutted by capable individuals looking to move up from part-time or unsatisfying work, even in an entry level position experience can matter greatly. To get a job in this market, you need to have a job.

##Throwing Trans Into the Mix Things really get tough when you start throwing any marginalization into the mix. Transgender individuals face higher unemployment and more barriers to employment than cis individuals. As a demographic, 37% of us are employed full time, 15% are employed part time, and 25% are students. Our unemployment rate is 20%4. Bear in mind that's the overall trans population; trans youth unemployment may skew higher since youth unemployment tends to be higher than the general population.

If finding a job were based on qualifications alone, the statistics would look very different. A study by Trans PULSE found that 71% of trans people in Ontario have post-secondary education5. That's nearly 3/4 of the trans population who have qualifications and training above and beyond high-school. These are individuals with expertise in their fields, and diplomas to back them up. However, to get a job you often have to do an interview, and this is where being transgender will most likely ruin any chance you have at getting a job. In a TorStar article, a transgender woman noted that no-one would give her a second interview and that occasionally interviewers would make up excuses as to why they couldn't conduct an interview4. I've had similar experiences myself.

There is a certain level of transphobia I've experienced in interviews. I am a femme leaning trans woman and because of this I feel immense pressure to conform to cis-normative beauty standards. I've only been on HRT for 14 months, my hair has not grown out nearly as long as I'd like, and I still see things I hate about myself when I look in the mirror. I feel like because of these, because of my failure to meet normative beauty standards, that I tend to be judged harshly by hiring managers most of whom only see gender through a binary lens. Since interviews are just as much about appearance as they are about qualifications, trans individuals who do not embody cis-normative beauty standards are often judged harshly.

Being a marginalized individual in any way makes it hard to be confident. Even if there's no overt vibes of transphobia, I find it very difficult to be put in centre stage and judged on appearance, demeanour, and confidence. I don't believe I conform to cis-normative standards and I don't believe that people are taking my identity seriously. This very much hurts my confidence.

I'm very sensitive and care a great deal about what others think of me, so negative comments about my appearance, my gender, my genitals, my height, my weight, my lack of wardrobe, always have a huge impact on me. I take all of these comments to heart, even when I know they're untrue and even when I know people are just looking to get under my skin. I internalize these thoughts and it completely erodes my confidence. Where I was once assured of the truth, the negative comments will eventually wear away at me where I'm simply full of self doubt, and this is baggage that tends to weigh heavily on me during an interview.

##Conclusion My experience is not unique, and this is a problem. In a generation that is constantly attacked as entitled and lazy6, we sure as fuck don't seem to have a whole hell of a lot in terms of gainful employment and market power. Most of us are incredibly overqualified for what few jobs are available.

We were sold a narrative that the baby boomers would retire and leave a vacuum in the job market. This is yet to happen; the boomers have yet to retire7. What this means, however, is that we face incredibly high youth unemployment rates, almost double the overall population. It also means that marginalized individuals are more likely to be left out, competing for jobs in a market scarce of employment opportunities.

In a game that rewards confidence and conformity, being different often hinders an applicant's ability to compete. Especially for trans people, the lack of conformity could become a huge hindrance to the pageant portion of a job application. Trans individuals may find themselves passed up for a cis applicant simply because they do not fit into a strictly binary and cisnormative model of gender, even if they possess similar or greater qualifications to a cis individual. Eventually, the discouragement faced by these individuals becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy; when you've been turned away so often from interviews because of your appearance, you become less likely to apply in the first place.

I think it's about time we start to think both about who we have as hiring managers, and how the hiring process is conducted. Hopefully when we're given the reins of power we can have an honest discussion about hiring and decrease the amount of sway a hiring manager with appearance based prejudices could have on the hiring process.

@duckinator

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duckinator commented Feb 4, 2016

On Transition and Unemployment

Paragraph 2:

  • "It honestly wasn't that bad a day," => change the comma to a period.

Paragraph 3:

  • "Inatri started slow, honestly" => "Inatri started slow; honestly,"

Unforgiving Job Market

Paragraph 1:

  • "to a lot of people, the youth bracket [...]" => "to a lot of people, as the youth bracket [...]"
  • "We are overqualified for our jobs." seems like it would go better at the end of the next paragraph.

Paragraph 3:

  • "over the last year, were not jobs in my field nor were they [...]" => "over the last year were not jobs in my field, nor were they [...]"

Paragraph 5:

  • "in the last year though," => "in the last year, though,"

Throwing Trans Into The Mix

Paragraphs 1-2:

  • Merge these two. Perhaps something like:

Things really get tough when you start throwing any marginalization into the mix. Transgender individuals face higher unemployment and more barriers to employment than cis individuals. [...]

Regardless of how you merge them:

  • The last sentence of the first paragraph and the first sentence of the second are redundant. The second one explains more, so you should probably stick with that one.
  • "It should come as no surprise, but transgender individuals" => "Transgender individuals"
  • "Bear in mind that's the overall population, trans youth" => "Bear in mind, that's the overall trans population; trans youth"

Paragraph 3:

  • "That's nearly 3/4 of the population" => of the trans population? 99% sure you aren't referring to the general population. Unless you are, specify; it's ambiguous as it is.
  • "I can corroborate this experience." => sounds kind of like you're saying you can corroborate that particular instance? Maybe something like "I've had similar experiences."?

Paragraph 4:

  • This entire paragraph needs to be redone or removed. It reads like it's implying you have to be on HRT, have long hair, etc if you're a trans woman. (I know that's not what you mean, but that's what it reads as.)

Paragraph 5:

  • "I don't believe I look passable" => same deal as the last paragraph.

Conclusion

  • Make it exist.
@duckinator

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duckinator commented Feb 5, 2016

On Transition and Unemployment

Paragraph 5:

  • "I don't have any clear understanding of why I've been failing to find a job, but I do have some thoughts." <-- it feels like this undermines your point a lot, while not providing much.

Unforgiving Job Market

Paragraph 1:

  • "Admittedly these are 2013 numbers, however, the [...]" => "Admittedly, these are 2013 numbers. However, the [...]"

Paragraph 4:

  • "no favours of the past year." => "no favours over the past year."

Paragraph 5:

  • "Let's be clear," => either "Let's be clear:" or "To be clear," or similar.
  • "[...] I've found, have asked [...]" => "[...] I've found have asked [...]"

Throwing Trans Into the Mix

Paragraph 1:

  • "As a demographic 37%" => "As a demographic, 37%"
  • "Bear in mind that's the overall population" => "Bear in mind that's the overall trans population"? (Possibly?)

Paragraph 5:

  • "ny genitals" => "my genitals"

Conclusion

Paragraph 2:

  • "completely scarce" doesn't really make sense?

Paragraph 3:

  • "strictly binary model of gender" => "strictly binary and cisnormative model of gender" (may as well go all-out. <3)
  • "Eventually the discouragement" => "Eventually, the discouragement"
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