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View Marking Eulerian and Hamiltonian circuits on a graph
# Eulerian circuits
EC = g.eulerian_circuit()
g.plot(edge_colors={‘red’:EC})
# Hamiltonian circuits
hc = g.hamiltonian_cycle().edges(labels=False)
g.show(edge_colors={'red':hc})
@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / warshall.py
Created Feb 19, 2016
SageMath implementation of Warshall's algorithm
View warshall.py
def warshall(M):
n = M.nrows()
W = M
for k in range(n):
for i in range(n):
for j in range(n):
W[i,j] = W[i,j] or (W[i,k] and W[k,j])
return W
@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / slackreply.md
Last active Feb 9, 2016
Reply about Slack and bandwidth
View slackreply.md

This was one of the main concerns about moving to Slack in the first place, so I understand the question. However it turns out there are a couple of ways to handle this that I think are pretty simple and relatively unobtrusive.

One way is to download the Slack app for your phone, if you have a smartphone, and set it up to give you notifications. That way you’ll be pinged if something gets posted (you can adjust what events cause a notification, and shut off notifications if needed).

Another way is that you can configure Slack to send you email notifications of direct messages or mentions. Here’s the official page with instructions: https://get.slack.help/hc/en-us/articles/201649273-Email-notifications Note that this does NOT send you notifications just of any posting whatsoever, just if someone messages you or mentions you directly. Those would be the notifications that typically you would want to respond to the most quickly. Then, for regular postings, if it were me I would set a recurring reminder on m

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / tuples.py
Last active Feb 6, 2016
Sets of tuples for Lesson 10 notes
View tuples.py
simplenextto = [(1,2), (2,1), (2,3), (3,2), (3,4), (4,3)]
simpledivides = [(2,2), (2,4), (2,6), (2,8), (2,10), (4,4), (4,8), (6,6), (8,8), (10, 10)]
@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / TechSymposium.md
Created Jan 29, 2016
Outline for GVSU Tech Symposium
View TechSymposium.md

Matt,

I promised I would send you some thoughts about the Tech Symposium keynote before we meet on Monday, and that's what this email is for. The title of the talk is "How can technology extend the humanity of learners? A dialogue" and I think what I'd like to see is the two of us asking each other questions that address the larger question in the title. The more I worked on an outline for the talk the less it seemed like an outline was really the right tool for the job. So below I have a list of questions that are given, all of which get at the larger question in the title, in the order in which they could be asked. I can see us taking turns asking each other these questions and giving answers and back-and-forth on these.

  • Questions about our students
    • Begin with anecdotes about students: Something we've seen a student do recently that drives us crazy, something that a student's done that makes us step back and say "wow".
    • Question: What motivates our students? Why do they do the things they do?
@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / 325assessments.md
Created Jan 25, 2016
Details on MTH 325 Assessments
View 325assessments.md

Information about Assessments in MTH 325

General Information

Success in MTH 325 involves demonstrating evidence that you are satisfying the 20 learning targets that we have discussed. These learning targets are posted in several different places on Blackboard, most especially on the Lessons and Learning Targets board. Your primary opportunity to demonstrate proficiency on those learning targets is on Assessments.

Assessments are short, timed quiz-like assignments that occur in specially-designated class meetings. Those class meetings are scheduled on the calendar and reminders of those dates will be posted on Blackboard usually in the Friday "Weekly Preview" posts. With some exceptions, the general pattern is that every other Monday is used for assessments.

Some important facts about assessments include:

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / MTH312Specs.md
Created Jan 16, 2016
MTH 312 Winter 2016 Specifications for Student Work
View MTH312Specs.md

Specifications for Student Work in MTH 312

About this document

Your work in MTH 312 is graded on the basis of the _professor's evaluation of your work relative to professional standards of acceptability, at a level appropriate for MTH 312. No points are used and no partial credit is awarded. Instead, each item of work you submit is evaluated using a simple rubric (either Pass/No Pass or EMRF, as described in the syllabus) that indicates whether or not it meets the standards for quality for that assignment. This document lays out the explicit details of those standards for each type of assssment. (For more information on the kinds of assessments in MTH 312 and information about how to revise work that does not meet specifications, please review the syllabus.)

Specifications for Course Management Assignments

Course Management assignments is a category that includes Course Awareness Quizzes, Preview Activities, and other assignments that may be given on a one-

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / 300loremipsum.md
Last active Jan 16, 2016
300 words of lorem ipsum
View 300loremipsum.md

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@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / MTH325Specs.md
Last active Jan 4, 2017
MTH 325 -- Specifications for Student Work (Winter 2016)
View MTH325Specs.md

Specifications for Student Work in MTH 325

About this document

Your work in MTH 325 is graded on the basis of the professor's evaluation of your work relative to professional standards of acceptability, at a level appropriate for MTH 325. No points are used and no partial credit is awarded. Instead, each item of work you submit is evaluated using a simple rubric (either Pass/No Pass or EMRF, as described in the syllabus) that indicates whether or not it meets the standards for quality for that assignment. This document lays out the explicit details of those standards for each type of assssment. (For more information on the kinds of assessments in MTH 325 and information about how to revise work that does not meet specifications, please review the syllabus.)

Specifications for Course Management Assignments

Course Management assignments is a category that includes Course Awareness Quizzes, Preview Activities, and Daily Homework. All of these are graded eith

@RobertTalbert
RobertTalbert / ResearchProject.md
Last active Jan 13, 2016
Details for MTH 312 Research Project
View ResearchProject.md

MTH 312: Research Project Information

Overview

The research project is one of two extended projects that MTH 312 students can work on to demonstrate competence in the course. The primary objective of the research project is:

Work with a small group to investigate either a technical or non-technical topic related to the course that was not explicitly covered in the course, and produce a presentation in which you briefly and effectively instruct a general audience on your topic.

In other words, what you'll be doing in the research project is choosing a topic that is not covered in the class but which is related to cryptography and privacy, researching it, and developing a short presentation on it that will be given to a general audience. The presentation will take place during our class' final exam period, which is Wednesday, April 27 from 12:00--1:50pm.

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