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@peterfoot
peterfoot / BluetoothComPort.cs
Last active Jan 17, 2022
enumerate the Bluetooth COM ports on desktop Windows. Determine the mappings between Bluetooth addresses and COM port names.
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using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;
namespace BluetoothDiagnostics
{
public sealed class BluetoothComPort
{
@sieyip
sieyip / README.md
Last active Jul 12, 2019
Installing Kafka on Mac OS X
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Installing Kafka on Mac OS X

Install Homebrew

Homebrew is a great little package manager for OS X. If you haven't already, installing it is pretty easy:

ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/Homebrew/homebrew/go/install)"
View 10-scala-one-liners-to-impress-your-friends.md

10 Scala One Liners to Impress Your Friends

Here are 10 one-liners which show the power of scala programming, impress your friends and woo women; ok, maybe not. However, these one liners are a good set of examples using functional programming and scala syntax you may not be familiar with. I feel there is no better way to learn than to see real examples.

Updated: June 17, 2011 - I'm amazed at the popularity of this post, glad everyone enjoyed it and to see it duplicated across so many languages. I've included some of the suggestions to shorten up some of my scala examples. Some I intentionally left longer as a way for explaining / understanding what the functions were doing, not necessarily to produce the shortest possible code; so I'll include both.

1. Multiple Each Item in a List by 2

The map function takes each element in the list and applies it to the corresponding function. In this example, we take each element and multiply it by 2. This will return a list of equivalent size, compare to o

@nikic
nikic / objects_arrays.md
Last active Jun 3, 2022
Post explaining why objects often use less memory than arrays (in PHP)
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Why objects (usually) use less memory than arrays in PHP

This is just a small post in response to [this tweet][tweet] by Julien Pauli (who by the way is the release manager for PHP 5.5). In the tweet he claims that objects use more memory than arrays in PHP. Even though it can be like that, it's not true in most cases. (Note: This only applies to PHP 5.4 or newer.)

The reason why it's easy to assume that objects are larger than arrays is because objects can be seen as an array of properties and a bit of additional information (like the class it belongs to). And as array + additional info > array it obviously follows that objects are larger. The thing is that in most cases PHP can optimize the array part of it away. So how does that work?

The key here is that objects usually have a predefined set of keys, whereas arrays don't:

@rwaldron
rwaldron / branch-count.sh
Created Jun 15, 2011
Count number of branches in a repo
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git branch | wc -l