View gist:eebe3455fd8e528bb14d193a93d43b59
Using my perf-tools just to wrap ftrace:
# ./perf-tools/bin/kprobe 'p:tcp_v4_connect skc_dport=+2(%si):u16'
Tracing kprobe tcp_v4_connect. Ctrl-C to end.
telnet-9723 [001] d... 62326244.175951: tcp_v4_connect: (tcp_v4_connect+0x0/0x480) skc_dport=1600
telnet-9725 [001] d... 62326246.502760: tcp_v4_connect: (tcp_v4_connect+0x0/0x480) skc_dport=1700
telnet-9726 [001] d... 62326247.861937: tcp_v4_connect: (tcp_v4_connect+0x0/0x480) skc_dport=100
telnet-9727 [001] d... 62326249.220740: tcp_v4_connect: (tcp_v4_connect+0x0/0x480) skc_dport=e803
Now a crappy ntohs() to process the dport string:
View HowToOTGFast.md

###Setting up Pi Zero OTG - The quick way (No USB keyboard, mouse, HDMI monitor needed)
More details - http://blog.gbaman.info/?p=791

For this method, alongside your Pi Zero, MicroUSB cable and MicroSD card, only an additional computer is required, which can be running Windows (with Bonjour, iTunes or Quicktime installed), Mac OS or Linux (with Avahi Daemon installed, for example Ubuntu has it built in).
1. Flash Raspbian Jessie full or Raspbian Jessie Lite onto the SD card.
2. Once Raspbian is flashed, open up the boot partition (in Windows Explorer, Finder etc) and add to the bottom of the config.txt file dtoverlay=dwc2 on a new line, then save the file.
3. If using a recent release of Jessie (Dec 2016 onwards), then create a new file simply called ssh in the SD card as well. By default SSH is

View comprehensions.md

Comprehensions in Python the Jedi way

by Bjørn Friese

Beautiful is better than ugly. Explicit is better than implicit.

-- The Zen of Python

I frequently deal with collections of things in the programs I write. Collections of droids, jedis, planets, lightsabers, starfighters, etc. When programming in Python, these collections of things are usually represented as lists, sets and dictionaries. Oftentimes, what I want to do with collections is to transform them in various ways. Comprehensions is a powerful syntax for doing just that. I use them extensively, and it's one of the things that keep me coming back to Python. Let me show you a few examples of the incredible usefulness of comprehensions.

View xhyve-freebsd-tutorial-1.md

TL;DR

  • Create 5GB FreeBSD image.
  • Install FreeBSD on xhyve.
  • Mount host directory.

Requisites

View phoenix-demo.md
View The Three Go Landmines.markdown

There are three easy to make mistakes in go. I present them here in the way they are often found in the wild, not in the way that is easiest to understand.

All three of these mistakes have been made in Kubernetes code, getting past code review at least once each that I know of.

  1. Loop variables are scoped outside the loop.

What do these lines do? Make predictions and then scroll down.

func print(pi *int) { fmt.Println(*pi) }
View README.md

Forecast

Holt-Winters smoother/forecaster for anomaly detection

Forecast threads a smooth curve through a noisy timeseries in a way that lets you visualize trends, cycles, and anomalies. It can be used as part of an automatic anomaly detection system for metric timeseries (that is, sequences of timestamped numerical values).

It accomplishes this using a variation of Holt-Winters forecasting -- more generally known as exponential smoothing. Forecast decomposes a noisy signal into level, trend, repetitive "seasonal" effects, and unexplained variation or noise. In this example, a "season" is a day long, and we model repeated day-over-day variation. The result is a smoothed version of the signal which may be used to forecast future values or detect unexpected variation. This approach has been successfully used for [network anomaly detection](https://www.usenix.org/legacy/event/lisa2000/full_papers/br

View Makefile
CFLAGS = -std=c99 -Wall
main : main.o
.PHONY : test clean
test : main
./$^ "*regex*" "*vtable*" < main.c
clean :
View chromecast_test.py
#!/usr/bin/python
import socket, ssl, select, time, re
from thread import start_new_thread
from struct import pack
TYPE_ENUM = 0
TYPE_STRING = 2
TYPE_BYTES = TYPE_STRING
def clean(s):
View perf-flame-graph-notes.md

The prep-script.sh will setup the latest Node and install the latest perf version on your Linux box.

When you want to generate the flame graph, run the following (folder locations taken from install script):

sudo sysctl kernel.kptr_restrict=0
# May also have to do the following:
# (additional reading http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/14227/do-i-need-root-admin-permissions-to-run-userspace-perf-tool-perf-events-ar )
sudo sysctl kernel.perf_event_paranoid=0