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View Looking into the Future.md

Looking into the Future

futures-rs is the library which will hopefully become a shared foundation for everything async in Rust. However it's already become renowned for having a steep learning curve, even for experienced Rustaceans.

I think one of the best ways to get comfortable with using a library is to look at how it works internally: often API design can seem bizarre or impenetrable and it's only when you put yourself in the shoes of the library author that you can really understand why it was designed that way.

In this post I'll try to put down on "paper" my understanding of how futures work and I'll aim to do it in a visual way. I'm going to assume you're already somewhat familiar with Rust and why futures are a useful tool to have at one's disposal.

For most of this post I'll be talking about how things work today (as of September 2017). At the end I'll touch on what's being proposed next and also make a case for some of the changes I'd like to see.

If you're interested in learning more ab

@jhass
jhass / README.md
Last active Aug 21, 2019 — forked from chitsaou/README.md
Proxy to remote server with CORS support
View README.md

cors.py for mitmproxy

Hacking CORS restriction to enable in-browser XHR to any server.

Usage

Say you are running an web app at localhost, and you want to send XHR to http://remote-server:80, but the CORS restriction forbids access because you are sending requests from an origin that remote-server:80 does not allow.

Run:

@haasn
haasn / about:config.md
Last active Mar 13, 2020
Firefox bullshit removal via about:config
View about:config.md

Firefox bullshit removal

Updated: Just use qutebrowser (and disable javascript). The web is done for.

@hellerbarde
hellerbarde / latency.markdown
Created May 31, 2012 — forked from jboner/latency.txt
Latency numbers every programmer should know
View latency.markdown

Latency numbers every programmer should know

L1 cache reference ......................... 0.5 ns
Branch mispredict ............................ 5 ns
L2 cache reference ........................... 7 ns
Mutex lock/unlock ........................... 25 ns
Main memory reference ...................... 100 ns             
Compress 1K bytes with Zippy ............. 3,000 ns  =   3 µs
Send 2K bytes over 1 Gbps network ....... 20,000 ns  =  20 µs
SSD random read ........................ 150,000 ns  = 150 µs
Read 1 MB sequentially from memory ..... 250,000 ns  = 250 µs
@jboner
jboner / latency.txt
Last active Mar 29, 2020
Latency Numbers Every Programmer Should Know
View latency.txt
Latency Comparison Numbers (~2012)
----------------------------------
L1 cache reference 0.5 ns
Branch mispredict 5 ns
L2 cache reference 7 ns 14x L1 cache
Mutex lock/unlock 25 ns
Main memory reference 100 ns 20x L2 cache, 200x L1 cache
Compress 1K bytes with Zippy 3,000 ns 3 us
Send 1K bytes over 1 Gbps network 10,000 ns 10 us
Read 4K randomly from SSD* 150,000 ns 150 us ~1GB/sec SSD
@roboshoes
roboshoes / touchmouse.js
Created Apr 13, 2012
This snippet maps mouse events and touch events onto one single event. This makes it easier in the code since you have to listen to only one event regardles whether it's desktop or mobile.
View touchmouse.js
(function() {
/* == GLOBAL DECLERATIONS == */
TouchMouseEvent = {
DOWN: "touchmousedown",
UP: "touchmouseup",
MOVE: "touchmousemove"
}
/* == EVENT LISTENERS == */
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