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Create self-signed certificate with root and ca for development
#!/bin/bash
rm *.jks 2> /dev/null
rm *.pem 2> /dev/null
echo "===================================================="
echo "Creating fake third-party chain root -> ca"
echo "===================================================="
# generate private keys (for root and ca)
keytool -genkeypair -alias root -dname "cn=Local Network - Development" -validity 10000 -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -ext bc:c -keystore root.jks -keypass password -storepass password
keytool -genkeypair -alias ca -dname "cn=Local Network - Development" -validity 10000 -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -ext bc:c -keystore ca.jks -keypass password -storepass password
# generate root certificate
keytool -exportcert -rfc -keystore root.jks -alias root -storepass password > root.pem
# generate a certificate for ca signed by root (root -> ca)
keytool -keystore ca.jks -storepass password -certreq -alias ca \
| keytool -keystore root.jks -storepass password -gencert -alias root -ext bc=0 -ext san=dns:ca -rfc > ca.pem
# import ca cert chain into ca.jks
keytool -keystore ca.jks -storepass password -importcert -trustcacerts -noprompt -alias root -file root.pem
keytool -keystore ca.jks -storepass password -importcert -alias ca -file ca.pem
echo "===================================================================="
echo "Fake third-party chain generated. Now generating my-keystore.jks ..."
echo "===================================================================="
# generate private keys (for server)
keytool -genkeypair -alias server -dname cn=server -validity 10000 -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -keystore my-keystore.jks -keypass password -storepass password
# generate a certificate for server signed by ca (root -> ca -> server)
keytool -keystore my-keystore.jks -storepass password -certreq -alias server \
| keytool -keystore ca.jks -storepass password -gencert -alias ca -ext ku:c=dig,keyEnc -ext "san=dns:localhost,ip:192.1.1.18" -ext eku=sa,ca -rfc > server.pem
# import server cert chain into my-keystore.jks
keytool -keystore my-keystore.jks -storepass password -importcert -trustcacerts -noprompt -alias root -file root.pem
keytool -keystore my-keystore.jks -storepass password -importcert -alias ca -file ca.pem
keytool -keystore my-keystore.jks -storepass password -importcert -alias server -file server.pem
echo "================================================="
echo "Keystore generated. Now generating truststore ..."
echo "================================================="
# import server cert chain into my-truststore.jks
keytool -keystore my-truststore.jks -storepass password -importcert -trustcacerts -noprompt -alias root -file root.pem
keytool -keystore my-truststore.jks -storepass password -importcert -alias ca -file ca.pem
keytool -keystore my-truststore.jks -storepass password -importcert -alias server -file server.pem
@jamiehankins

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@jamiehankins jamiehankins commented Aug 20, 2018

I realize this is from two years ago, but it's very helpful.

However, when it gets to the point where I'm trying to import the root certificate into the intermediate store, I get this:
keytool error: java.lang.Exception: Input not an X.509 certificate

Given that this is a pretty stale post, I don't expect a response, but if someone else sees it, they'll know they're not alone. I'll look for the solution and post it here if I find it and remember. :-)

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@jamiehankins jamiehankins commented Aug 20, 2018

Update: when I look at root.pem with a hex editor, I see that it's UTF-16 (what Windows calls UNICODE). If I copy and paste it as UTF-8, then it imports it fine. That means something about how keytool pipes this out is causing it.

By the way, I'm using Powershell on Windows. That's probably the problem, somehow.

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@jamiehankins jamiehankins commented Aug 20, 2018

Yes, the problem was Powershell. When you use the '>' operator to send output to a file, it's an alias for Out-File. Out-File writes as UTF-16 by default.

The answer is to replace "> root.pem" with "| Out-File root.pem -encoding ASCII".

Hopefully, this will help a weary traveller.

@andrejonathan

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@andrejonathan andrejonathan commented Mar 7, 2019

Thank you , this is amazing

@mithun3

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@mithun3 mithun3 commented Jun 25, 2019

Thank you!

@arpcpro

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@arpcpro arpcpro commented Aug 2, 2019

It seems promising since it uses keytool for the entire procedure. Unfortunately it does not create the client side *.crt file that I need. This way the clients browsers will always show the security warning since I cannot import the certificate to windows trusted certificate authorities.

@pagetronic

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@pagetronic pagetronic commented Aug 20, 2019

Perfect ! Thank you!

@rroehrig

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@rroehrig rroehrig commented Oct 22, 2019

Thanks but why do you use "-ext eku=sa,ca"?

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Owner Author

@granella granella commented Oct 22, 2019

Thanks but why do you use "-ext eku=sa,ca"?

it's is an Extended Key Usage for TLS server authentication

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5280#section-4.2.1.12

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