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[CSE373] Lecture, work on winston-cloudwatch, Emacs xwidgets (-175)

[CSE373] Lecture, work on winston-cloudwatch, Emacs xwidgets (-175)

https://days.to/31-may/2017

I'm going to write mostly every day as part of my journey, I hope this will work as a preparation for my Recurse Center batch next year: I've seen lot of people documenting their experience over the whole length, to try to maximise their learning. So I suppose this doesn't have any value for anyone except me.

Anyway here it is:

CSE373 2012 - Lecture 16 - Graph Algorithms (con't 3)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgDOQq6iWy8&list=PLOtl7M3yp-DV69F32zdK7YJcNXpTunF2b&index=16

Released version 1.10.0 for winston-cloudwatch

https://github.com/lazywithclass/winston-cloudwatch

Started looking into a bug reported for winston-cloudwatch

https://github.com/lazywithclass/winston-cloudwatch/issues/55

Embedding WebKit in Emacs: XWidgets+WebKit Feature Preview

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2YdjpWJJHs

I'm trying to see if there's some way to programmatically talk to XWidgets, specifically talk with WebKit, it would be great to be able to evaluate JavaScript code.

Installing Emacs

This is what I did to get to a version that has XWidgets capability

$ sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ubuntu-elisp
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install emacs-snapshot

Playing with XWidget and WebKit

I know nothing about XWidget and WebKit.

That aside I think there's room for some fun here, possibly some learning and ah-ha moments, I don't think I can extract something usable.

This is what I got first after some trial and error:

(let ((my-widget (make-xwidget 'webkit "my-widget" 1 1 nil)))
      (xwidget-webkit-execute-script my-widget "alert(eval(1 + 1))"))

Which alerts 2. Good so far.

I am thinking about smart auto completion, given

function test() { 
  return { answer: 42 }
}

var result = test()

when I type in Emacs test.an I would like the autocompletion feature to suggest test.answer, and not just because it's already in the same file, maybe along with the returned type.

It's a strange feeling coding something being certain you're not going to have anything usable out of it.

(let ((my-widget (make-xwidget 'webkit "my-widget" 1 1 nil)))
  (xwidget-webkit-execute-script my-widget "window.result = 1 + 1")
  (xwidget-webkit-execute-script my-widget "alert(window.result)"))

This is what I got as next experiment, but I don't think this is a viable way of doing things, too slow, I will look into WebKit APIs tomorrow.

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