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Converting Mbox mailboxes to Maildir format. See <http://batleth.sapienti-sat.org/projects/mb2md/>
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
#
# $Id: mb2md.pl,v 1.26 2004/03/28 00:09:46 juri Exp $
#
# mb2md-3.20.pl Converts Mbox mailboxes to Maildir format.
#
# Public domain.
#
# Republished by Philipp Klaus.
# Referred to by <http://blog.philippklaus.de/2010/02/convert-mbox-to-maildir/>
#
# currently maintained by:
# Juri Haberland <juri@koschikode.com>
# initially wrote by:
# Robin Whittle
#
# This script's web abode is http://batleth.sapienti-sat.org/projects/mb2md/ .
# For a changelog see http://batleth.sapienti-sat.org/projects/mb2md/changelog.txt
#
# The Mbox -> Maildir inner loop is based on qmail's script mbox2maildir, which
# was kludged by Ivan Kohler in 1997 from convertandcreate (public domain)
# by Russel Nelson. Both these convert a single mailspool file.
#
# The qmail distribution has a maildir2mbox.c program.
#
# What is does:
# =============
#
# Reads a directory full of Mbox format mailboxes and creates a set of
# Maildir format mailboxes. Some details of this are to suit Courier
# IMAP's naming conventions for Maildir mailboxes.
#
# http://www.inter7.com/courierimap/
#
# This is intended to automate the conversion of the old
# /var/spool/mail/blah file - with one call of this script - and to
# convert one or more mailboxes in a specifed directory with separate
# calls with other command line arguments.
#
# Run this as the user - in these examples "blah".
# This version supports conversion of:
#
# Date The date-time in the "From " line of the message in the
# Mbox format is the date when the message was *received*.
# This is transformed into the date-time of the file which
# contains the message in the Maildir mailbox.
#
# This relies on the Date::Parse perl module and the utime
# perl function.
#
# The script tries to cope with errant forms of the
# Mbox "From " line which it may encounter, but if
# there is something really screwy in a From line,
# then perhaps the script will fail when "touch"
# is given an invalid date. Please report the
# exact nature of any such "From " line!
#
#
# Flagged
# Replied
# Read = Seen
# Tagged for Deletion
#
# In the Mbox message, flags for these are found in the
# "Status: N" or "X-Status: N" headers, where "N" is 0
# or more of the following characters in the left column.
#
# They are converted to characters in the right column,
# which become the last characters of the file name,
# following the ":2," which indicates IMAP message status.
#
#
# F -> F Flagged
# A -> R Replied
# R -> S Read = Seen
# D -> T Tagged for Deletion (Trash)
#
# This is based on the work of Philip Mak who wrote a
# completely separate Mbox -> Maildir converter called
# perfect_maildir and posted it to the Mutt-users mailing
# list on 25 December 2001:
#
# http://www.mail-archive.com/mutt-users@mutt.org/msg21872.html
#
# Michael Best originally integrated those changes into mb2md.
#
#
# In addition, the names of the message files in the Maildir are of a
# regular length and are of the form:
#
# 7654321.000123.mbox:2,xxx
#
# Where "7654321" is the Unix time in seconds when the script was
# run and "000123" is the six zeroes padded message number as
# messages are converted from the Mbox file. "xxx" represents zero or
# more of the above flags F, R, S or T.
#
#
# ---------------------------------------------------------------------
#
#
# USAGE
# =====
#
# Run this as the user of the mailboxes, not as root.
#
#
# mb2md -h
# mb2md [-c] -m [-d destdir]
# mb2md [-c] -s sourcefile [-d destdir]
# mb2md [-c] -s sourcedir [-l wu-mailboxlist] [-R|-f somefolder] [-d destdir] [-r strip_extension]
#
# -c use the Content-Length: headers (if present) to find the
# beginning of the next message
# Use with caution! Results may be unreliable. I recommend to do
# a run without "-c" first and only use it if you are certain,
# that the mbox in question really needs the "-c" option
#
# -m If this is used then the source will
# be the single mailbox at /var/spool/mail/blah for
# user blah and the destination mailbox will be the
# "destdir" mailbox itself.
#
#
# -s source Directory or file relative to the user's home directory,
# which is where the the "somefolders" directories are located.
# Or if starting with a "/" it is taken as a
# absolute path, e.g. /mnt/oldmail/user
#
# or
#
# A single mbox file which will be converted to
# the destdir.
#
# -R If defined, do not skip directories found in a mailbox
# directory, but runs recursively into each of them,
# creating all wanted folders in Maildir.
# Incompatible with '-f'
#
# -f somefolder Directories, relative to "sourcedir" where the Mbox files
# are. All mailboxes in the "sourcedir"
# directory will be converted and placed in the
# "destdir" directory. (Typically the Inbox directory
# which in this instance is also functioning as a
# folder for other mailboxes.)
#
# The "somefolder" directory
# name will be encoded into the new mailboxes' names.
# See the examples below.
#
# This does not save an UW IMAP dummy message file
# at the start of the Mbox file. Small changes
# in the code could adapt it for looking for
# other distinctive patterns of dummy messages too.
#
# Don't let the source directory you give as "somefolders"
# contain any "."s in its name, unless you want to
# create subfolders from the IMAP user's point of
# view. See the example below.
#
# Incompatible with '-f'
#
#
# -d destdir Directory where the Maildir format directories will be created.
# If not given, then the destination will be ~/Maildir .
# Typically, this is what the IMAP server sees as the
# Inbox and the folder for all user mailboxes.
# If this begins with a '/' the path is considered to be
# absolute, otherwise it is relative to the users
# home directory.
#
# -r strip_ext If defined this extension will be stripped from
# the original mailbox file name before creating
# the corresponding maildir. The extension must be
# given without the leading dot ("."). See the example below.
#
# -l WU-file File containing the list of subscribed folders. If
# migrating from WU-IMAP the list of subscribed folders will
# be found in the file called .mailboxlist in the users
# home directory. This will convert all subscribed folders
# for a single user:
# /bin/mb2md -s mail -l .mailboxlist -R -d Maildir
# and for all users in a directory as root you can do the
# following:
# for i in *; do echo $i;su - $i -c "/bin/mb2md -s mail -l .mailboxlist -R -d Maildir";done
#
#
# Example
# =======
#
# We have a bunch of directories of Mbox mailboxes located at
# /home/blah/oldmail/
#
# /home/blah/oldmail/fffff
# /home/blah/oldmail/ggggg
# /home/blah/oldmail/xxx/aaaa
# /home/blah/oldmail/xxx/bbbb
# /home/blah/oldmail/xxx/cccc
# /home/blah/oldmail/xxx/dddd
# /home/blah/oldmail/yyyy/huey
# /home/blah/oldmail/yyyy/duey
# /home/blah/oldmail/yyyy/louie
#
# With the UW IMAP server, fffff and ggggg would have appeared in the root
# of this mail server, along with the Inbox. aaaa, bbbb etc, would have
# appeared in a folder called xxx from that root, and xxx was just a folder
# not a mailbox for storing messages.
#
# We also have the mailspool Inbox at:
#
# /var/spool/mail/blah
#
#
# To convert these, as user blah, we give the first command:
#
# mb2md -m
#
# The main Maildir directory will be created if it does not exist.
# (This is true of any argument options, not just "-m".)
#
# /home/blah/Maildir/
#
# It has the following subdirectories:
#
# /home/blah/Maildir/tmp/
# /home/blah/Maildir/new/
# /home/blah/Maildir/cur/
#
# Then /var/spool/blah file is read, split into individual files and
# written into /home/blah/Maildir/cur/ .
#
# Now we give the second command:
#
# mb2md -s oldmail -R
#
# This reads recursively all Mbox mailboxes and creates:
#
# /home/blah/Maildir/.fffff/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.ggggg/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.xxx/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.xxx.aaaa/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.xxx.bbbb/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.xxx.cccc/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.xxx.aaaa/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.yyyy/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.yyyy.huey/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.yyyy.duey/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.yyyy.louie/
#
# The result, from the IMAP client's point of view is:
#
# Inbox -----------------
# |
# | fffff -----------
# | ggggg -----------
# |
# - xxx -------------
# | | aaaa --------
# | | bbbb --------
# | | cccc --------
# | | dddd --------
# |
# - yyyy ------------
# | huey -------
# | duey -------
# | louie ------
#
# Note that although ~/Maildir/.xxx/ and ~/Maildir/.yyyy may appear
# as folders to the IMAP client the above commands to not generate
# any Maildir folders of these names. These are simply elements
# of the names of other Maildir directories. (if you used '-R', they
# whill be able to act as normal folders, containing messages AND folders)
#
# With a separate run of this script, using just the "-s" option
# without "-f" nor "-R", it would be possible to create mailboxes which
# appear at the same location as far as the IMAP client is
# concerned. By having Mbox mailboxes in some directory:
# ~/oldmail/nnn/ of the form:
#
# /home/blah/oldmail/nn/xxxx
# /home/blah/oldmail/nn/yyyyy
#
# then the command:
#
# mb2md -s oldmail/nn
#
# will create two new Maildirs:
#
# /home/blah/Maildir/.xxx/
# /home/blah/Maildir/.yyyy/
#
# Then what used to be the xxx and yyyy folders now function as
# mailboxes too. Netscape 4.77 needed to be put to sleep and given ECT
# to recognise this - deleting the contents of (Win2k example):
#
# C:\Program Files\Netscape\Users\uu\ImapMail\aaa.bbb.ccc\
#
# where "uu" is the user and "aaa.bbb.ccc" is the IMAP server
#
# I often find that deleting all this directory's contents, except
# "rules.dat", forces Netscape back to reality after its IMAP innards
# have become twisted. Then maybe use File > Subscribe - but this
# seems incapable of subscribing to folders.
#
# For Outlook Express, select the mail server, then click the
# "IMAP Folders" button and use "Reset list". In the "All"
# window, select the mailboxes you want to see in normal
# usage.
#
#
# This script did not recurse subdirectories or delete old mailboxes, before addition of the '-R' parameter :)
#
# Be sure not to be accessing the Mbox mailboxes while running this
# script. It does not attempt to lock them. Likewise, don't run two
# copies of this script either.
#
#
# Trickier usage . . .
# ====================
#
# If you have a bunch of mailboxes in a directory ~/oldmail/doors/
# and you want them to appear in folders such as:
#
# ~/Maildir/.music.bands.doors.Jim
# ~/Maildir/.music.bands.doors.John
#
# etc. so they appear in an IMAP folder:
#
# Inbox -----------------
# | music
# | bands
# | doors
# | Jim
# | John
# | Robbie
# | Ray
#
# Then you could rename the source directory to:
#
# ~/oldmail/music.bands.doors/
#
# then use:
#
# mb2md -s oldmail -f music.bands.doors
#
#
# Or simply use '-R' switch with:
# mb2md -s oldmail -R
#
#
# Stripping mailbox extensions:
# =============================
#
# If you want to convert mailboxes that came for example from
# a Windows box than you might want to strip the extension of
# the mailbox name so that it won't create a subfolder in your
# mail clients view.
#
# Example:
# You have several mailboxes named Trash.mbx, Sent.mbx, Drafts.mbx
# If you don't strip the extension "mbx" you will get the following
# hierarchy:
#
# Inbox
# |
# - Trash
# | | mbx
# |
# - Sent
# | | mbx
# |
# - Drafts
# | mbx
#
# This is more than ugly!
# Just use:
# mb2md -s oldmail -r mbx
#
# Note: don't specify the dot! It will be stripped off
# automagically ;)
#
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
use strict;
use Getopt::Std;
use Date::Parse;
use IO::Handle;
use Fcntl;
# print the usage message
sub usage() {
print "Usage:\n";
print " mb2md -h\n";
print " mb2md [-c] -m [-d destdir]\n";
print " mb2md [-c] -s sourcefile [-d destdir]\n";
die " mb2md [-c] -s sourcedir [-l wu-mailboxlist] [-R|-f somefolder] [-d destdir] [-r strip_extension]\n";
}
# get options
my %opts;
getopts('d:f:chms:r:l:R', \%opts) || usage();
usage() if ( defined($opts{h})
|| (!defined($opts{m}) && !defined($opts{s})) );
# Get uid, username and home dir
my ($name, $passwd, $uid, $gid, $quota, $comment, $gcos, $homedir, $shell) = getpwuid($<);
# Get arguments and determine source
# and target directories.
my $mbroot = undef; # this is the base directory for the mboxes
my $mbdir = undef; # this is an mbox dir relative to the $mbroot
my $mbfile = undef; # this is an mbox file
my $dest = undef;
my $strip_ext = undef;
my $use_cl = undef; # defines whether we use the Content-Length: header if present
# if option "-c" is given, we use the Content-Length: header if present
# dangerous! may be unreliable, as the whole CL stuff is a bad idea
if (defined($opts{c}))
{
$use_cl = 1;
} else {
$use_cl = 0;
}
# first, if the user has gone the -m option
# we simply convert their mailfile
if (defined($opts{m}))
{
if (defined($ENV{'MAIL'})) {
$mbfile = $ENV{'MAIL'};
} elsif ( -f "/var/spool/mail/$name" ) {
$mbfile = "/var/spool/mail/$name"
} elsif ( -f "/var/mail/$name" ) {
$mbfile = "/var/mail/$name"
} else {
die("I searched \$MAIL, /var/spool/mail/$name and /var/mail/$name, ".
"but I couldn't find your mail spool file - ");
}
}
# see if the user has specified a source directory
elsif (defined($opts{s}))
{
# if opts{s} doesn't start with a "/" then
# it is a subdir of the users $home
# if it does start with a "/" then
# let's take $mbroot as a absolut path
$opts{s} = "$homedir/$opts{s}" if ($opts{s} !~ /^\//);
# check if the given source is a mbox file
if (-f $opts{s})
{
$mbfile = $opts{s};
}
# otherwise check if it is a directory
elsif (-d $opts{s})
{
$mbroot = $opts{s};
# get rid of trailing /'s
$mbroot =~ s/\/$//;
# check if we have a specified sub directory,
# otherwise the sub directory is '.'
if (defined($opts{f}))
{
$mbdir = $opts{f};
# get rid of trailing /'s
$mbdir =~ s/\/$//;
}
}
# otherwise we have an error
else
{
die("Fatal: Source is not an mbox file or a directory!\n");
}
}
# get the dest
defined($opts{d}) && ($dest = $opts{d}) || ($dest = "Maildir");
# see if we have anything to strip
defined($opts{r}) && ($strip_ext = $opts{r});
# No '-f' with '-R'
if((defined($opts{R}))&&(defined($opts{f}))) { die "No recursion with \"-f\"";}
# Get list of folders
my @flist;
if(defined($opts{l}))
{
open (LIST,$opts{l}) or die "Could not open mailbox list $opts{l}: $!";
@flist=<LIST>;
close LIST;
}
# if the destination is relative to the home dir,
# check that the home dir exists
die("Fatal: home dir $homedir doesn't exist.\n") if ($dest !~ /^\// && ! -e $homedir);
#
# form the destination value
# slap the home dir on the front of the dest if the dest does not begin
# with a '/'
$dest = "$homedir/$dest" if ($dest !~ /^\//);
# get rid of trailing /'s
$dest =~ s/\/$//;
# Count the number of mailboxes, or
# at least files, we found.
my $mailboxcount = 0;
# Since we'll be making sub directories of the main
# Maildir, we need to make sure that the main maildir
# exists
&maildirmake($dest);
# Now we do different things depending on whether we convert one mbox
# file or a directory of mbox files
if (defined($mbfile))
{
if (!isamailboxfile($mbfile))
{
print "Skipping $mbfile: not a mbox file\n";
}
else
{
print "Converting $mbfile to maildir: $dest\n";
# this is easy, we just run the convert function
&convert($mbfile, $dest);
}
}
# if '-f' was used ...
elsif (defined($mbdir))
{
print "Converting mboxdir/mbdir: $mbroot/$mbdir to maildir: $dest/\n";
# Now set our source directory
my $sourcedir = "$mbroot/$mbdir";
# check that the directory we are supposed to be finding mbox
# files in, exists and is a directory
-e $sourcedir or die("Fatal: MBDIR directory $sourcedir/ does not exist.\n");
-d $sourcedir or die("Fatal: MBDIR $sourcedir is not a directory.\n");
&convertit($mbdir,"");
}
# Else, let's work in $mbroot
else
{
opendir(SDIR, $mbroot)
or die("Fatal: Cannot open source directory $mbroot/ \n");
while (my $sourcefile = readdir(SDIR))
{
if (-d "$mbroot/$sourcefile") {
# Recurse only if requested (to be changed ?)
if (defined($opts{R})) {
print "convertit($sourcefile,\"\")\n";
&convertit($sourcefile,"");
} else {
print("$sourcefile is a directory, but '-R' was not used... skipping\n");
}
}
elsif (!-f "$mbroot/$sourcefile")
{
print "Skipping $mbroot/$sourcefile : not a file nor a dir\n";
next;
}
elsif (!isamailboxfile("$mbroot/$sourcefile"))
{
print "Skipping $mbroot/$sourcefile : not a mbox file\n";
next;
}
else
{
&convertit($sourcefile,"");
}
} # end of "while ($sfile = readdir(SDIR))" loop.
closedir(SDIR);
printf("$mailboxcount files processed.\n");
}
#
exit 0;
# My debbugging placeholder I can put somewhere to show how far the script ran.
# die("So far so good.\n\n");
# The isamailboxfile function
# ----------------------
#
# Here we check if the file is a mailbox file, not an address-book or
# something else.
# If file is empty, we say it is a mbox, to create it empty.
#
# Returns 1 if file is said mbox, 0 else.
sub isamailboxfile {
my ($mbxfile) = @_;
return 1 if(-z $mbxfile);
sysopen(MBXFILE, "$mbxfile", O_RDONLY) or die "Could not open $mbxfile ! \n";
while(<MBXFILE>) {
if (/^From/) {
close(MBXFILE);
return 1;
}
else {
close(MBXFILE);
return 0;
}
}
}
# The convertit function
# -----------------------
#
# This function creates all subdirs in maildir, and calls convert()
# for each mbox file.
# Yes, it becomes the 'main loop' :)
sub convertit
{
# Get subdir as argument
my ($dir,$oldpath) = @_;
$oldpath =~ s/\/\///;
# Skip files beginning with '.' since they are
# not normally mbox files nor dirs (includes '.' and '..')
if ($dir =~ /^\./)
{
print "Skipping $dir : name begins with a '.'\n";
return;
}
my $destinationdir = $dir;
my $temppath = $oldpath;
# We don't want to have .'s in the $targetfile file
# name because they will become directories in the
# Maildir. Therefore we convert them to _'s
$temppath =~ s/\./\_/g;
$destinationdir =~ s/\./\_/g;
# Appending $oldpath => path is only missing $dest
$destinationdir = "$temppath.$destinationdir";
# Converting '/' to '.' in $destinationdir
$destinationdir =~s/\/+/\./g;
# source dir
my $srcdir="$mbroot/$oldpath/$dir";
printf("convertit(): Converting $dir in $mbroot/$oldpath to $dest/$destinationdir\n");
&maildirmake("$dest/$destinationdir");
print("destination = $destinationdir\n");
if (-d $srcdir) {
opendir(SUBDIR, "$srcdir") or die "can't open $srcdir !\n";
my @subdirlist=readdir(SUBDIR);
closedir(SUBDIR);
foreach (@subdirlist) {
next if (/^\.+$/);
print("Sub: $_\n");
print("convertit($_,\"$oldpath/$dir\")\n");
&convertit($_,"$oldpath/$dir");
}
} else {
# Source file verifs ....
#
return if(defined($opts{l}) && !inlist("$oldpath/$dir",@flist));
if (!isamailboxfile("$mbroot/$oldpath/$dir"))
{
print "Skipping $dir (is not mbox)\n";
next;
}
# target file verifs...
#
# if $strip_extension is defined,
# strip it off the $targetfile
defined($strip_ext) && ($destinationdir =~ s/\.$strip_ext$//);
&convert("$mbroot/$oldpath/$dir","$dest/$destinationdir");
$mailboxcount++;
}
}
# The maildirmake function
# ------------------------
#
# It does the same thing that the maildirmake binary that
# comes with courier-imap distribution
#
sub maildirmake
{
foreach(@_) {
-d $_ or mkdir $_,0700 or die("Fatal: Directory $_ doesn't exist and can't be created.\n");
-d "$_/tmp" or mkdir("$_/tmp",0700) or die("Fatal: Unable to make $_/tmp/ subdirectory.\n");
-d "$_/new" or mkdir("$_/new",0700) or die("Fatal: Unable to make $_/new/ subdirectory.\n");
-d "$_/cur" or mkdir("$_/cur",0700) or die("Fatal: Unable to make $_/cur/ subdirectory.\n");
}
}
# The inlist function
# ------------------------
#
# It checks that the folder to be converted is in the list of subscribed
# folders in WU-IMAP
#
sub inlist
{
my ($file,@flist) = @_;
my $valid = 0;
# Get rid of the first / if any
$file =~ s/^\///;
foreach my $folder (@flist) {
chomp $folder;
if ($file eq $folder) {
$valid = 1;
last;
}
}
if (!$valid) {
print "$file is not in list\n";
}
else {
print "$file is in list\n";
}
return $valid;
}
#
# The convert function
# ---------------------
#
# This function does the down and dirty work of
# actually converting the mbox to a maildir
#
sub convert
{
# get the source and destination as arguments
my ($mbox, $maildir) = @_;
printf("Source Mbox is $mbox\n");
printf("Target Maildir is $maildir \n") ;
# create the directories for the new maildir
#
# if it is the root maildir (ie. converting the inbox)
# these already exist but thats not a big issue
&maildirmake($maildir);
# Change to the target mailbox directory.
chdir "$maildir" ;
# Converts a Mbox to multiple files
# in a Maildir.
# This is adapted from mbox2maildir.
#
# Open the Mbox mailbox file.
if (sysopen(MBOX, "$mbox", O_RDONLY))
{
#printf("Converting Mbox $mbox . . . \n");
}
else
{
die("Fatal: unable to open input mailbox file: $mbox ! \n");
}
# This loop scans the input mailbox for
# a line starting with "From ". The
# "^" before it is pattern-matching
# lingo for it being at the start of a
# line.
#
# Each email in Mbox mailbox starts
# with such a line, which is why any
# such line in the body of the email
# has to have a ">" put in front of it.
#
# This is not required in a Maildir
# mailbox, and some majik below
# finds any such quoted "> From"s and
# gets rid of the "> " quote.
#
# Each email is put in a file
# in the cur/ subdirectory with a
# name of the form:
#
# nnnnnnnnn.cccc.mbox:2,XXXX
#
# where:
# "nnnnnnnnn" is the Unix time since
# 1970 when this script started
# running, incremented by 1 for
# every email. This is to ensure
# unique names for each message
# file.
#
# ".cccc" is the message count of
# messages from this mbox.
#
# ".mbox" is just to indicate that
# this message was converted from
# an Mbox mailbox.
#
# ":2," is the start of potentially
# multiple IMAP flag characters
# "XXXX", but may be followed by
# nothing.
#
# This is sort-of compliant with
# the Maildir naming conventions
# specified at:
#
# http://www.qmail.org/man/man5/maildir.html
#
# This approach does not involve the
# process ID or the hostname, but it is
# probably good enough.
#
# When the IMAP server looks at this
# mailbox, it will move the files to
# the cur/ directory and change their
# names as it pleases. In the case
# of Courier IMAP, the names will
# become like:
#
# 995096541.25351.mbox:2,S
#
# with 25351 being Courier IMAP's
# process ID. The :2, is the start
# of the flags, and the "S" means
# that this one has been seen by
# the user. (But is this the same
# meaning as the user actually
# having opened the message to see
# its contents, rather than just the
# IMAP server having been asked to
# list the message's Subject etc.
# so the client could list it in the
# visible Inbox?)
#
# This contrasts with a message
# created by Courier IMAP, say with
# a message copy, which is like:
#
# 995096541.25351.zair,S=14285:2,S
#
# where ",S=14285" is the size of the
# message in bytes.
#
# Courier Maildrop's names are similar
# but lack the ":2,XXXX" flags . . .
# except for my modified Maildrop
# which can deliver them with a
# ":2,T" - flagged for deletion.
#
# I have extended the logic of the
# per-message inner loop to stop
# saving a file for a message with:
#
# Subject: DON'T DELETE THIS MESSAGE -- FOLDER INTERNAL DATA
#
# This is the dummy message, always
# at the start of an Mbox format
# mailbox file - and is put there
# by UW IMAPD. Since quite a few
# people will use this for
# converting from a UW system,
# I figure it is worth it.
#
# I will not save any such message
# file for the dummy message.
#
# Plan
# ----
#
# We want to read the entire Mbox file, whilst
# going through a loop for each message we find.
#
# We want to read all the headers of the message,
# starting with the "From " line. For that "From "
# line we want to get a date.
#
# For all other header lines, we want to store them
# in $headers whilst parsing them to find:
#
# 1 - Any flags in the "Status: " or "X-Status: " or
# "X-Mozilla-Status: " lines.
#
# 2 - A subject line indicating this is the dummy message
# at the start (typically, but not necessarily) of
# the Mbox.
#
# Once we reach the end of the headers, we will crunch any
# flags we found to create a file name. Then, unless this is
# the dummy message we create that file and write all the
# headers to it.
#
# Then we continue reading the Mbox, converting ">From " to
# "From " and writing it to the file, until we reach one of:
#
# 1 - Another "From " line (indicating the start of another
# message).
#
# or
#
# 2 - The end of the Mbox.
#
# In the former case, which we detect at the start of the loop
# we need to close the file and touch it to alter its date-time.
#
# In the later case, we also need to close the file and touch
# it to alter its date-time - but this is beyond the end of the
# loop.
# Variables
# ---------
my $messagecount = 0;
# For generating unique filenames for
# each message. Initialise it here with
# numeric time in seconds since 1970.
my $unique = time;
# Name of message file to delete if we found that
# it was created by reading the Mbox dummy message.
my $deletedummy = '';
# To store the complete "From (address) (date-time)
# which delineates the start of each message
# in the Mbox
my $fromline = '';
# Set to 1 when we are reading the header lines,
# including the "From " line.
#
# 0 means we are reading the message body and looking
# for another "From " line.
my $inheaders = 0;
# Variable to hold all headers (apart from
# the first line "From ...." which is not
# part of the message itself.
my $headers = '';
# Variable to hold the accumulated characters
# we find in header lines of the type:
#
# Status:
# X-Status:
# X-Mozilla-Status:
# X-Evolution:
my $flags = '';
# To build the file name for the message in.
my $messagefn = '';
# The date string from the "From " line of each
# message will be written here - and used by
# touch to alter the date-time of each message
# file. Put non-date text here to make it
# spit the dummy if my code fails to find a
# date to write into this.
my $receivedate = 'Bogus';
# The subject of the message
my $subject = '';
my $previous_line_was_empty = 1;
# We record the message start line here, for error
# reporting.
my $startline;
# If defined, we use this as the number of bytes in the
# message body rather than looking for a /^From / line.
my $contentlength;
# A From lines can either occur as the first
# line of a file, or after an empty line.
# Most mail systems will quote all From lines
# appearing in the message, but some will only
# do it when necessary.
# Since we initialise the variable to true,
# we don't need to check for beginning of file.
while(<MBOX>)
{
# exchange possible Windows EOL (CRLF) with Unix EOL (LF)
$_ =~ s/\r\n$/\n/;
if ( /^From /
&& $previous_line_was_empty
&& (!defined $contentlength)
)
{
# We are reading the "From " line which has an
# email address followed by a receive date.
# Turn on the $inheaders flag until we reach
# the end of the headers.
$inheaders = 1;
# record the message start line
$startline = $.;
# If this is not the first run through the loop
# then this means we have already been working
# on a message.
if ($messagecount > 0)
{
# If so, then close that message file and then
# use utime to change its date-time.
#
# Note this code should be duplicated to do
# the same thing at the end of the while loop
# since we must close and touch the final message
# file we were writing when we hit the end of the
# Mbox file.
close (OUT);
if ($messagefn ne '') {
my $t = str2time($receivedate);
utime $t, $t, $messagefn;
}
}
# Because we opened the Mbox file without any
# variable, I think this means that we have its
# current line in Perl's default variable "$_".
# So all sorts of pattern matching magic works
# directly on it.
# We are currently reading the first line starting with
# "From " which contains the date we want.
#
# This will be of the form:
#
# From dduck@test.org Wed Nov 24 11:05:35 1999
#
# at least with UW-IMAP.
#
# However, I did find a nasty exception to this in my
# tests, of the form:
#
# "bounce-MusicNewsletter 5-rw=test.org"@announce2.mp3.com
#
# This makes it trickier to get rid of the email address,
# but I did find a way. I can't rule out that there would
# be some address like this with an "@" in the quoted
# portion too.
#
# Unfortunately, testing with an old Inbox Mbox file,
# I also found an instance where the email address
# had no @ sign at all. It was just an email
# account name, with no host.
#
# I could search for the day of the week. If I skipped
# at least one word of non-whitespace (1 or more contiguous
# non-whitespace characters) then searched for a day of
# the week, then I should be able to avoid almost
# every instance of a day of the week appearing in
# the email address.
#
# Do I need a failsafe arrangement to provide some
# other date to touch if I don't get what seems like
# a date in my resulting string? For now, no.
#
# I will take one approach if there is an @ in the
# "From " line and another (just skip the first word
# after "From ") if there is no @ in the line.
#
# If I knew more about Perl I would probably do it in
# a more elegant way.
# Copy the current line into $fromline.
$fromline = $_;
# Now get rid of the "From ". " =~ s" means substitute.
# Find the word "From " at the start of the line and
# replace it with nothing. The nothing is what is
# between the second and third slash.
$fromline =~ s/^From // ;
# Likewise get rid of the email address.
# This first section is if we determine there is one
# (or more . . . ) "@" characters in the line, which
# would normally be the case.
if ($fromline =~ m/@/)
{
# The line has at least one "@" in it, so we assume
# this is in the middle of an email address.
#
# If the email address had no spaces, then we could
# get rid of the whole thing by searching for any number
# of non-whitespace characters (\S) contiguously, and
# then I think a space. Subsitute nothing for this.
#
# $fromline =~ s/(\S)+ // ;
#
# But we need something to match any number of non-@
# characters, then the "@" and then all the non-whitespace
# characters from there (which takes us to the end of
# "test.org") and then the space following that.
#
# A tutorial on regular expressions is:
#
# http://www.perldoc.com/perl5.6.1/pod/perlretut.html
#
# Get rid of all non-@ characters up to the first "@":
$fromline =~ s/[^@]+//;
# Get rid of the "@".
$fromline =~ s/@//;
}
# If there was an "@" in the line, then we have now
# removed the first one (lets hope there aren't more!)
# and everything which preceded it.
#
# we now remove either something like
# '(foo bar)'. eg. '(no mail address)',
# or everything after the '@' up to the trailing
# timezone
#
# FIXME: all those regexp should be combined to just one single one
$fromline =~ s/(\((\S*| )+\)|\S+) *//;
chomp $fromline;
# Stash the date-time for later use. We will use it
# to touch the file after we have closed it.
$receivedate = $fromline;
# Debugging lines:
#
# print "$receivedate is the receivedate of message $messagecount.\n";
# $receivedate = "Wed Nov 24 11:05:35 1999";
#
# To look at the exact date-time of files:
#
# ls -lFa --full-time
#
# End of handling the "From " line.
}
# Now process header lines which are not the "From " line.
if ( ($inheaders eq 1)
&& (! /^From /)
)
{
# Now we are reading the header lines after the "From " line.
# Keep looking for the blank line which indicates the end of the
# headers.
# ".=" means append the current line to the $headers
# variable.
#
# For some reason, I was getting two blank lines
# at the end of the headers, rather than one,
# so I decided not to read in the blank line
# which terminates the headers.
#
# Delete the "unless ($_ eq "\n")" to get rid
# of this kludge.
$headers .= $_ unless ($_ eq "\n");
# Now scan the line for various status flags
# and to fine the Subject line.
$flags .= $1 if /^Status: ([A-Z]+)/;
$flags .= $1 if /^X-Status: ([A-Z]+)/;
if (/^X-Mozilla-Status: ([0-9a-f]{4})/i)
{
$flags .= 'R' if (hex($1) & 0x0001);
$flags .= 'A' if (hex($1) & 0x0002);
$flags .= 'D' if (hex($1) & 0x0008);
}
if(/^X\-Evolution:\s+\w{8}\-(\w{4})/oi)
{
$b = pack("H4", $1); #pack it as 4 digit hex (0x0000)
$b = unpack("B32", $b); #unpack into bit string
# "usually" only the right most six bits are used
# however, I have come across a seventh bit in
# about 15 (out of 10,000) messages with this bit
# activated.
# I have not found any documentation in the source.
# If you find out what it does, please let me know.
# Notes:
# Evolution 1.4 does mark forwarded messages.
# The sixth bit is to denote an attachment
$flags .= 'A' if($b =~ /[01]{15}1/); #replied
$flags .= 'D' if($b =~ /[01]{14}1[01]{1}/); #deleted
$flags .= 'T' if($b =~ /[01]{13}1[01]{2}/); #draft
$flags .= 'F' if($b =~ /[01]{12}1[01]{3}/); #flagged
$flags .= 'R' if($b =~ /[01]{11}1[01]{4}/); #seen/read
}
$subject = $1 if /^Subject: (.*)$/;
if ($use_cl eq 1)
{
$contentlength = $1 if /^Content-Length: (\d+)$/;
}
# Now look out for the end of the headers - a blank
# line. When we find it, create the file name and
# analyse the Subject line.
if ($_ eq "\n")
{
# We are at the end of the headers. Set the
# $inheaders flag back to 0.
$inheaders = 0;
# Include the current newline in the content length
++$contentlength if defined $contentlength;
# Create the file name for the current message.
#
# A simple version of this would be:
#
# $messagefn = "cur/$unique.$messagecount.mbox:2,";
#
# This would create names with $messagecount values of
# 1, 2, etc. But for neatness when looking at a
# directory of such messages, sorted by filename,
# I want to have leading zeroes on message count, so
# that they would be 000001 etc. This makes them
# appear in message order rather than 1 being after
# 19 etc. So this is good for up to 999,999 messages
# in a mailbox. It is a cosmetic matter for a person
# looking into the Maildir directory manually.
# To do this, use sprintf instead with "%06d" for
# 6 characters of zero-padding:
$messagefn = sprintf ("cur/%d.%06d.mbox:2,", $unique, $messagecount) ;
# Append flag characters to the end of the
# filename, according to flag characters
# collected from the message headers
$messagefn .= 'F' if $flags =~ /F/; # Flagged.
$messagefn .= 'R' if $flags =~ /A/; # Replied to.
$messagefn .= 'S' if $flags =~ /R/; # Seen or Read.
$messagefn .= 'T' if $flags =~ /D/; # Tagged for deletion.
# Opens filename $messagefn for output (>) with filehandle OUT.
open(OUT, ">$messagefn") or die("Fatal: unable to create new message $messagefn");
# Count the messages.
$messagecount++;
# Only for the first message,
# check to see if it is a dummy.
# Delete the message file we
# just created if it was for the
# dummy message at the start
# of the Mbox.
#
# Add search terms as required.
# The last 2 lines are for rent.
#
# "m" means match the regular expression,
# but we can do without it.
#
# Do I need to escape the ' in "DON'T"?
# I didn't in the original version.
if ( (($messagecount == 1) && defined($subject))
&& ($subject =~ m/^DON'T DELETE THIS MESSAGE -- FOLDER INTERNAL DATA/)
)
{
# Stash the file name of the dummy message so we
# can delete it later.
$deletedummy = "$messagefn";
}
# Print the collected headers to the message file.
print OUT "$headers";
# Clear $headers and $flags ready for the next message.
$headers = '';
$flags = '';
# End of processing the headers once we found the
# blank line which terminated them
}
# End of dealing with the headers.
}
if ( $inheaders eq 0)
{
# We are now processing the message body.
#
# Now we have passed the headers to the
# output file, we scan until the while
# loop finds another "From " line.
# Decrement our content length if we're
# using it to find the end of the message
# body
if (defined $contentlength) {
# Decrement our $contentlength variable
$contentlength -= length($_);
# The proper end for a message with Content-Length
# specified is the $contentlength variable should
# be exactly -1 and we should be on a bare
# newline. Note that the bare newline is not
# printed to the end of the current message as
# it's actually a message separator in the mbox
# format rather than part of the message. The
# next line _should_ be a From_ line, but just in
# case the Content-Length header is incorrect
# (e.g. a corrupt mailbox), we just continue
# putting lines into the current message until we
# see the next From_ line.
if ($contentlength < 0) {
if ($contentlength == -1 && $_ eq "\n") {
$contentlength = undef;
next;
}
$contentlength = undef;
}
}
#
# We want to copy every part of the message
# body to the output file, except for the
# quoted ">From " lines, which was the
# way the IMAP server encoded body lines
# starting with "From ".
#
# Pattern matching Perl majik to
# get rid of an Mbox quoted From.
#
# This works on the default variable "$_" which
# contains the text from the Mbox mailbox - I
# guess this is the case because of our
# (open(MBOX ....) line above, which did not
# assign this to anything else, so it would go
# to the default variable. This enables
# inscrutably terse Perlisms to follow.
#
# "s" means "Subsitute" and it looks for any
# occurrence of ">From" starting at the start
# of the line. When it finds this, it replaces
# it with "From".
#
# So this finds all instances in the Mbox message
# where the original line started with the word
# "From" but was converted to ">From" in order to
# not be mistaken for the "From ..." line which
# is used to demark each message in the Mbox.
# This was was a destructive conversion because
# any message which originally had ">From" at the
# start of the line, before being put into the
# Mbox, will now have that line without the ">".
s/^>From /From /;
# Glorious tersness here. Thanks Simon for
# explaining this.
#
# "print OUT" means print the default variable to
# the file of file handle OUT. This is where
# the bulk of the message text is written to
# the output file.
print OUT or die("Fatal: unable to write to new message to $messagefn");
# End of the if statement dealing with message body.
}
$previous_line_was_empty = ( $_ eq "\n" );
# End of while (MBOX) loop.
}
# Close the input file.
close(MBOX);
# Close the output file, and duplicate the code
# from the start of the while loop which touches
# the date-time of the most recent message file.
close(OUT);
if ($messagefn ne '') {
my $t = str2time($receivedate);
utime $t, $t, $messagefn;
}
# After all the messages have been
# converted, check to see if the
# first one was a dummy.
# if so, delete it and make
# the message count one less.
if ($deletedummy ne "")
{
printf("Dummy mail system first message detected and not saved.\n");
unlink $deletedummy;
$messagecount--;
}
printf("$messagecount messages.\n\n");
}
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