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How to retrieve values from EOL XML output (note we have to register default namespace)

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<?php
 
$xml ='<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
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<taxonConcept>
<taxonConceptID>1045608</taxonConceptID>
<dwc:ScientificName>Apis mellifera Linnaeus 1758</dwc:ScientificName>
<commonName xml:lang="da" eol_preferred="true">Honningbi</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="de" eol_preferred="true">Honigbiene</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="en" eol_preferred="true">European honey bee</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="en">A Honeybee</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="en">Queen honeybee</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="en">Western Honeybee</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="en">honey bee</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="es" eol_preferred="true">Apis mellifera</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="es">abeja de la miel</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="fr">abeille domestique</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="it" eol_preferred="true">ape del miele</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="pt" eol_preferred="true">abelha do mel</commonName>
<commonName xml:lang="zh" eol_preferred="true">西方蜜蜂</commonName>
<reference>1. National Biodiversity Network Species Dictionary (March 2003) &lt;a href="http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nbn/"&gt;http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nbn/&lt;/a&gt;</reference>
<reference>1996. database, NODC Taxonomic Code</reference>
<reference>2. Sterry, P. (1997) &lt;i&gt;Collins Complete British Wildlife Photoguide&lt;/i&gt;. Harper Collins Publishers Ltd., London.</reference>
<reference>2005. manuscript, Checklist of Apoidea of North America.. - 18-Nov-2005</reference>
<reference>2006. database, Apoidea Database, Fauna Europaea</reference>
<reference>2007. database, Checklist for Apoidea, Australian Faunal Directory</reference>
<reference>2008. manuscript, World Bee Checklist Project - update 2008-09</reference>
<reference>3. Buczacki, S. (2002) &lt;i&gt;Fauna Britannica&lt;/i&gt;. Hamlyn, London.</reference>
<reference>4. O\'Toole, C. (2002) &lt;i&gt;The New Encyclopedia of Insects and Their Allies&lt;/i&gt;. Oxford University Press, Oxford.</reference>
<reference>5. Von Frisch, K. (1966) &lt;i&gt;The dancing bees: an account of the life and senses of the honey bee&lt;/i&gt;. Methuen &amp; Co Ltd., London.</reference>
<reference>6. Beekeeping and &lt;i&gt;Apis&lt;/i&gt; Biodiversity in Europe (BABE). The European Commission (March 2003) &lt;a href="http://www.biologie.uni-halle.de/zool/mol_ecol/babe/brochure.pdf"&gt;http://www.biologie.uni-halle.de/zool/mol_ecol/babe/brochure.pdf&lt;/a&gt;</reference>
<reference>Abreu, R., S. Moraes, O. Malaspina. 2000. Histological aspects and protein content of &lt;em&gt;Apis mellifera&lt;/em&gt; L. worker venom glands: the effect of electrical shocks in summer and winter. Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins, 6/1: 87-98.</reference>
<reference>Adjare, S. 1990. Beekeeping in Africa. Rome, Italy: Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations. Accessed November 06, 2008 at http://www.fao.org/docrep/t0104e/T0104E00.htm.</reference>
<reference>Alaux C; Ducloz F; Crauser D; Le Conte Y. 2010. Diet effects on honeybee immunocompetence. Biology Letters.</reference>
<reference>Amdam, G., K. Nilsen, K. Norberg, M. Fondrk, K. Hartfelder. 2007. Variation in endocrine signaling underlies variation in social life history. The American Naturalist, 170/1: 37-46.</reference>
<reference>Apis mellifera Linnaeus</reference>
<reference>Black R. 2010. Bee decline linked to falling biodiversity. BBC News &lt;a target="_blank" href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8467746.stm"&gt;[Internet]&lt;/a&gt;,</reference>
<reference>Breed, M., L. Butler, T. Stiller. 1985. Kin discrimination by worker honey bees in genetically mixed groups. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 82/9: 3058-3061.</reference>
<reference>Clarke, K., T. Rinderer, P. Franck, Q. Javier, B. Oldroyd. 2002. The africanization of honeybees (&lt;em&gt;Apis mellifera&lt;/em&gt; L.) of the Yucatan: a study of a massive hybridization event across time. Evolution, 56/7: 1462-1474.</reference>
<reference>Evangelista C; Kraft P; Dacke M; Reinhard J; Srinivasan MV. 2010. The moment before touchdown: landing manoeuvres of the honeybee Apis mellifera. Journal of Experimental Biology. 213: 262-270.</reference>
<reference>F. E. Zeuner and F. J. Manning. 1976. A Monograph on Fossil Bees: Apoidea. Bulletin of the British Museum of Natural History (Geology) 27(3):151-264</reference>
<reference>Gonzalez, A., C. Rowe, P. Weeks, D. Whittle, F. Gilbert, C. Barnard. 1995. Flower choice by honey bees (&lt;em&gt;Apis mellifera&lt;/em&gt; L.): sex-phase of flowers and preferences among nectar and pollen foragers. Oecologia, 101/2: 258-264.</reference>
<reference>Haddad et al. (2007) Extended longevity of queen honey bees compared to workers is associated with peroxidation-resistant membranes. Exp Gerontol, 42:601-609.</reference>
<reference>Helen Phillips. 2005. The aerodynamic tricks that keep bees airborne. New Scientist. 188(2528):</reference>
<reference>Hemmer, W., M. Focke, D. Kolarich, I. Wilson, F. Altmann, S. Wöhrl, M. Götz, R. Jarisch. 2001. Antibody binding to venom carbohydrates is a frequent cause for double positivity to honeybee and yellow jacket venom in patients with stinging-insect allergy. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 108/6: 1045-1052.</reference>
<reference>Hilty, J. Editor. 2013. Insect Visitors of Illinois Wildflowers. &amp;nbsp; World Wide Web electronic publication. illinoiswildflowers.info, version (03/2013) &amp;nbsp; &lt;br&gt;See: &amp;nbsp; &lt;a href=\'http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/flower_insects/files/abbreviations.htm\'&gt;Abbreviations for Insect Activities&lt;/a&gt;, &amp;nbsp; &lt;a href=\'http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/flower_insects/files/observers.htm\'&gt;Abbreviations for Scientific Observers&lt;/a&gt;, &amp;nbsp; &lt;a href=\'http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/flower_insects/files/references.htm\'&gt;References for behavioral observations&lt;/a&gt;</reference>
<reference>Honey Bee (AgriLIFE Extension, Texas A &amp; M System)
</reference>
<reference>Honey Bee, AgriLIFE Extension, Texas A &amp; M System
</reference>
<reference>Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, Carpenter Bees, and Sweat Bees (R. Wright, P. Mulder, and H. Reed, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service)
</reference>
<reference>Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, Carpenter Bees, and Sweat Bees, R. Wright, P. Mulder, and H. Reed, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service
</reference>
<reference>Honeybee Biology (Ross E. Koning, Plant Physiology Website, 1994)</reference>
<reference>Honeybee Biology, Ross E. Koning, Plant Physiology Website, 1994</reference>
<reference>Hsu C-Y; Ko F-Y; Li C-W; Fann K; Lue J-T. 2007. Magnetoreception system in honeybees Apis mellifera. PLoS ONE. 2(4): e395.</reference>
<reference>Jones, J. C.; Myerscough, M. R.; Graham, S.; Oldroyd, B. P. 2004. Honey Bee Nest Thermoregulation: Diversity Promotes Stability. American Association for the Advancement of Science. 402-404 p.</reference>
<reference>Kang, S., C. Pak, H. Choi. 2002. The effect of whole bee venom on arthritis. The American Journal of Chinese Medicine, 30/1: 73-80.</reference>
<reference>LIPPS, B. 2002. Sub-lethal injection of honeybee venom decreased the levels of endogenously present substance in organs of mice. Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins, 8/2: 255-268.</reference>
<reference>Miller, Peter. 2007. The Genius of Swarms. National Geographic &lt;a target="_blank" href="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2007/07/swarms/miller-text"&gt;[Internet]&lt;/a&gt;,</reference>
<reference>Milne, M., L. Milne. 2000. National Audubon Society: Field Guide To Insects and Spiders. New York, Canada: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc..</reference>
<reference>Morse, R. 1978. Honey bee pests, predators, and diseases. Ithaca, New York, USA: Cornell University Press.</reference>
<reference>Nicholson SW. 2009. Water homeostasis in bees, with the emphasis on sociality. Journal of Experimental Biology. 212: 429-434.</reference>
<reference>Percival, M. 1947. Pollen collection by &lt;em&gt;Apis mellifera&lt;/em&gt; . New Phytologist, 46/1: 142-173.</reference>
<reference>Pinto, A., W. Rubink, R. Coulson, J. Patton, S. Johnston. 2004. Temporal pattern of africanization in a feral honeybee population from texas inferred from mitochondrial DNA. Evolution, 58/5: 1047-1055.</reference>
<reference>Pirk, CWW; Hepburn, HR; Radloff, SE; Tautz. 2004. Honeybee combs: construction through a liquid equilibrium process?. Naturwissenschaften. 91: 350-353.</reference>
<reference>Pollination and Honey Bees (R. D. Fell, Mid-Atlantic Orchard Monitoring Guide, April 27, 2005)
</reference>
<reference>Pollination and Honey Bees, R. D. Fell, Mid-Atlantic Orchard Monitoring Guide, April 27, 2005
</reference>
<reference>Reinhard, J., M. Srinivasan, S. Zhang. 2004. Scent-triggered navigation in honeybees. Nature, 427: 411.</reference>
<reference>Roat, T., C. Landim. 2008. Temporal and morphological differences in post-embryonic differentiation of the mushroom bodies in the brain of workers, queens and drones of &lt;em&gt;Apis mellifera&lt;/em&gt; (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Micron, 39: 1171-1178.</reference>
<reference>Roubik, D. 1989. Ecology and natural history of tropical bees. New York City, New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.</reference>
<reference>Ruggiero M. (project leader), Ascher J. et al. (2012). ITIS Bees: World Bee Checklist (version Sep 2009). In: Species 2000 &amp; ITIS Catalogue of Life, 25th June 2012 (Bisby F., Roskov Y., Culham A., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Paglinawan L., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., eds). Digital resource at www.catalogueoflife.org/col/. Species 2000: Reading, UK.</reference>
<reference>Sammataro, D., A. Avitabile. 1998. The Beekeeper\'s Handbook, 3rd edition. Ithaca, New York, USA: Comstock Publishing Associates.</reference>
<reference>Sandoz, C., M. Hammer, R. Menzel. 2002. Side specificity of olfactory learning in the honeybee: US input side. Learning and Memory, 9: 337-348.</reference>
<reference>Seeley, T., R. Seeley, P. Akratanakul. 1982. Colony defense strategies of the honeybees in Thailand. Ecological Monographs, 52/1: 43-63.</reference>
<reference>Shemesh, Y., M. Cohen, G. Bloch. 2007. Natural plasticity in circadian rhythms is mediated by reorganization in molecular clockwork in honeybees. The FASEB Journal, 21: 2304-2311.</reference>
<reference>Sherman, G., K. Visscher. 2002. Honeybee colonies achieve fitness through dancing. Nature, 419: 920-922.</reference>
<reference>Shuker, KPN. 2001. The Hidden Powers of Animals: Uncovering the Secrets of Nature. London: Marshall Editions Ltd. 240 p.</reference>
<reference>Sohn E. 2009. Bees always have a safe landing. Discovery News &lt;a target="_blank" href="http://news.discovery.com/animals/bees-flight-landing-aircraft-design.html"&gt;[Internet]&lt;/a&gt;,</reference>
<reference>Southwick, E., G. Heldmaier. 1987. Temperature control in honeybee colonies. BioScience, 37/6: 395-399.</reference>
<reference>Stinging Insects: Honey Bees (K. Gardner, C. Klass, and N. Calderone, Cornell University - Master Beekeeper Program)
</reference>
<reference>Stinging Insects: Honey Bees, K. Gardner, C. Klass, and N. Calderone, Cornell University - Master Beekeeper Program
</reference>
<reference>Tarpy, D., R. Page Jr.. 2000. No behavior control over mating frequency in queen honeybees (&lt;em&gt;Apis mellifera&lt;/em&gt; L.): implications for the evolution of extreme polyandry. The American Naturalist, 155/6: 820-827.</reference>
<reference>University of Georgia Honey Bee Program (University of Georgia)
</reference>
<reference>University of Georgia Honey Bee Program, University of Georgia
</reference>
<reference>Weinstock, G.M. et al. 2006. (The Honeybee Genome Sequencing Consortium). Insights into social insects from the genome of the honeybee Apis mellifera. Nature 443:931–949. &lt;a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature05260"&gt;10.1038/nature05260&lt;/a&gt;
</reference>
<reference>Wilson, E.O. 2006. Genomics: How to make a social insect. Nature 443:919-920. &lt;a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/443919a"&gt;10.1038/443919a&lt;/a&gt;</reference>
<reference>Winston, M., J. Dropkin, O. Taylor. 1981. Demography and life history characteristics of two honey bee races (&lt;em&gt;Apis mellifera&lt;/em&gt;). Oecologia, 48: 407-413.</reference>
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<dwc:scientificName>Apis mellifera</dwc:scientificName>
<dwc:nameAccordingTo>NCBI Taxonomy</dwc:nameAccordingTo>
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<dwc:taxonID>46497385</dwc:taxonID>
<dwc:scientificName>Apis mellifera Linnaeus 1758</dwc:scientificName>
<dwc:nameAccordingTo>Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS)</dwc:nameAccordingTo>
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<dwc:taxonID>47773392</dwc:taxonID>
<dwc:scientificName>Apis mellifera Linnaeus 1758</dwc:scientificName>
<dwc:nameAccordingTo>Species 2000 &amp; ITIS Catalogue of Life: May 2012</dwc:nameAccordingTo>
<dwc:taxonRank>Species</dwc:taxonRank>
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<taxon>
<dc:identifier>urn:paleodb:tn235173</dc:identifier>
<dwc:taxonID>49379619</dwc:taxonID>
<dwc:scientificName>Apis (Apis) mellifera Linnaeus 1758</dwc:scientificName>
<dwc:nameAccordingTo>Paleobiology Database</dwc:nameAccordingTo>
<dwc:taxonRank>Species</dwc:taxonRank>
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<dc:identifier>44bde209-1a83-48bc-bacf-877b39463c35</dc:identifier>
<dwc:taxonID>50293009</dwc:taxonID>
<dwc:scientificName>Apis mellifera</dwc:scientificName>
<dwc:nameAccordingTo>Taxonomic Hierarchy of COL-China 2012</dwc:nameAccordingTo>
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<agent homepage="" role="author">Bob Corrigan</agent>
<agent homepage="" role="provider">Bob Corrigan</agent>
<dcterms:created>2011-10-26 10:19:30 UTC</dcterms:created>
<dcterms:modified>2011-10-26 10:19:30 UTC</dcterms:modified>
<dc:language>en</dc:language>
<dcterms:rightsHolder>National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) at http://www.nbii.gov</dcterms:rightsHolder>
<dc:source>http://www.nbii.gov/portal/server.pt/community/honey_bees/1543/european_honey_bee/5360</dc:source>
<subject>http://rs.tdwg.org/ontology/voc/SPMInfoItems#TaxonBiology</subject>
<dc:description>The European honey bee, also known as the common or western honey bee (Apis mellifera) is so named because it produces large amounts of honey. It is believed that the honey bee originated in Africa and spread to northern Europe, India, and China. The honey bee is not native to North America, but was brought here with the first colonists. The honey bee is now distributed world wide.
 
European honey bees are variable in color, but are some shade of black or brown intermixed with yellow. The bee ranges from 3/8 to 3/4 of an inch long, with workers being the smallest and the queen being the largest. A queen bee is elongate and has a straight stinger with no barbs. A worker bee has hind legs specialized for collecting pollen - each leg is flattened and covered with long fringed hairs that form a pollen basket. A worker bee\'s stinger has barbs. A drone bee is stout-bodied and has large eyes.
 
Wild European honey bee nests are found in hollow trees or man-made structures. Managed colonies are often kept in wooden hives. Flowers in meadows, open woods, agricultural areas, and yards and gardens are visited by worker bees.</dc:description>
<reference>Honey Bee (AgriLIFE Extension, Texas A &amp; M System)
</reference>
<reference>University of Georgia Honey Bee Program (University of Georgia)
</reference>
<reference>Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, Carpenter Bees, and Sweat Bees (R. Wright, P. Mulder, and H. Reed, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service)
</reference>
<reference>Stinging Insects: Honey Bees (K. Gardner, C. Klass, and N. Calderone, Cornell University - Master Beekeeper Program)
</reference>
<reference>Pollination and Honey Bees (R. D. Fell, Mid-Atlantic Orchard Monitoring Guide, April 27, 2005)
</reference>
<reference>Honeybee Biology (Ross E. Koning, Plant Physiology Website, 1994)</reference>
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<dc:title>Description</dc:title>
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<dc:rights>Copyright Wildscreen 2003-2008</dc:rights>
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<dc:description>The honey bee is probably one of the best-known of all insects in the world (3); it performs a vital role in the pollination of flowering plants, including our crop species (4) . There are three \'castes\' within a bee hive, a \'queen\' (the reproductive female), the \'drones\' (reproductive males) and \'workers\' (non-reproductive females) (3). All three castes are broadly similar in appearance; the body is covered in short hairs, and is divided into a head, a thorax and an abdomen, the head features two large eyes and a pair of antennae. The thorax bears two pairs of wings above, and three pairs of legs below and there is a slender \'waist\' between the thorax and abdomen (5). The queen has a much longer and slender abdomen than the workers, and the drones can be identified by their broader abdomens and much larger eyes (5).</dc:description>
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<agent homepage="" role="photographer">Image:MFB.jpg Richard Bartz, Munich Makro Freak &amp;amp; Beemaster Hubert Seibring, Munich which gave me advice and a protection suite ;) My dog caught 6 bee-stings on the nose, i caught 4.</agent>
<agent homepage="http://commons.wikimedia.org/" role="provider">Wikimedia Commons</agent>
<dc:title>File:Apis mellifera carnica worker hive entrance 3.jpg</dc:title>
<dc:language>en</dc:language>
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<dc:description>&lt;b&gt;German:&lt;/b&gt; &lt;b&gt;Beschreibung:&lt;/b&gt; Die Kärntner Biene (Apis mellifera carnica, auch: Krainer Biene) ist eine natürlich entstandene Rasse der Westlichen Honigbiene (Apis mellifera). Von den Imkern wird sie auch einfach Carnica genannt. &amp;nbsp;&lt;b&gt;English:&lt;/b&gt; &lt;b&gt;Description:&lt;/b&gt; The Carniolan honey bee (Apis mellifera carnica) is a subspecies of Western honey bee. It originates from Slovenia, but can now be found also in Austria, part of Hungary, Romania, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Serbia. &amp;nbsp;&lt;b&gt;French:&lt;/b&gt; &lt;b&gt;Description:&lt;/b&gt; Abeille carnolienne (Apis mellifera carnica), une sous-espèce de l\'abeille domestique européenne provenant de Slovénie. Aujourd\'hui, on la trouve aussi en Autriche, et dans certaines régions de Hongrie, Roumanie, Croatie, Bosnie Herzégovine et Serbie. &amp;nbsp;&lt;b&gt;Italian:&lt;/b&gt; &lt;b&gt;Descrizione:&lt;/b&gt; L\'ape carnica (Apis mellifera carnica POLLMANN, 1879) è una sottospecie di ape mellifera dell\'Europa occidentale. Originaria della Slovenia centrale (Carniola), ha un\'area di distribuzione naturale che abbraccia l\'Austria, parte dell\'Ungheria, Romania, Croazia, Bosnia e Serbia. Fu introdotta per azione dell\'uomo in Canada, Stati uniti e Sudamerica. &amp;nbsp;&lt;b&gt;Portuguese:&lt;/b&gt; &lt;b&gt;Descrição:&lt;/b&gt; A &lt;i&gt;Apis mellifera carnica&lt;/i&gt; é uma subespécie de abelha. É originária da Eslovénia, mas pode ser encontrada na Áustria, parte da Hungria, Roménia, Croácia, Bósnia e Herzegovina e Sérvia. &amp;nbsp;User:Makro Freak Postprocessed Picture</dc:description>
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<agent homepage="http://www.flickr.com/photos/57720887@N05" role="photographer">Treesha Duncan</agent>
<agent homepage="http://www.flickr.com/groups/encyclopedia_of_life" role="provider">Flickr: EOL Images</agent>
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<dc:title>Bee Happy</dc:title>
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<dc:description>Bee in the bird bath. I placed a stone in it that absorbs water and the bees can land on it and suck the water from the stone. No more drowned bees. You can also add a sponge or Loofah that is all natural and they will get the same results. The brighter the sponge the more bees you will attract.&amp;nbsp;Do not add sponges that have chemicals like soap added for cleaning. Shot in my backyard in San Angelo Texas.</dc:description>
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</additionalInformation>
</dataObject>
</response>';
 
 
$dom= new DOMDocument;
$dom->loadXML($xml);
$xpath = new DOMXPath($dom);
 
// Namespaces (note that we have to register the default namespace, which I will call "eol")
$xpath->registerNamespace('eol', 'http://www.eol.org/transfer/content/1.0');
$xpath->registerNamespace('dc', 'http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/');
 
// XPath query
$nodes = $xpath->query ("//eol:dataObjectID");
foreach ($nodes as $node)
{
echo $node->firstChild->nodeValue . "\n";
}
 
?>

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