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View route-based-chunking.md

Route-based chunking

Many of us building single-page apps today use JavaScript module bundling tools that trend towards a monolithic "bundle.js" file including the full app and vendor code for multiple routes. This means if a user lands on any arbitrary route they need to wait for a large bundle of JS to be fetched, parsed and executed before the application is fully rendered and interactive.

screen shot 2016-09-28 at 4 45 52 pm

This is a little backwards, especially when apps are used under real-world network (3G) and device

@gaearon
gaearon / connect.js
Last active Oct 6, 2019
connect.js explained
View connect.js
// connect() is a function that injects Redux-related props into your component.
// You can inject data and callbacks that change that data by dispatching actions.
function connect(mapStateToProps, mapDispatchToProps) {
// It lets us inject component as the last step so people can use it as a decorator.
// Generally you don't need to worry about it.
return function (WrappedComponent) {
// It returns a component
return class extends React.Component {
render() {
return (
@vasanthk
vasanthk / System Design.md
Last active Oct 13, 2019
System Design Cheatsheet
View System Design.md

System Design Cheatsheet

Picking the right architecture = Picking the right battles + Managing trade-offs

Basic Steps

  1. Clarify and agree on the scope of the system
  • User cases (description of sequences of events that, taken together, lead to a system doing something useful)
    • Who is going to use it?
    • How are they going to use it?
@mlynch
mlynch / auth.markdown
Last active Nov 22, 2018
AngularJS Authentication and CORS
View auth.markdown

Single Page Apps are ruling the world and AngularJS is leading the charge. But many of the lessons we learned in the Web 2.0 era no longer apply, and few are as drastically different as authentication.

CORS

CORS is an oft-misunderstood feature of new browsers that is configured by a remote server. CORS stands for Cross-Origin-Resource-Sharing, and was designed to make it possible to access services outside of the current origin (or domain) of the current page.

Like many browser features, CORS works because we all agree that it works. So all major browsers like Chrome, Firefox, and IE support and enforce it. By using these browsers, you benefit from the security of CORS.

That means certain browsers do not enforce it, so it is not relevant there. One large example is a native Web View for things like Cordova and Phonegap. However, these tools often have configuration options for whitelisting domains so you can add some security that way.

@DanHerbert
DanHerbert / fix-homebrew-npm.md
Last active Oct 12, 2019
Instructions on how to fix npm if you've installed Node through Homebrew on Mac OS X or Linuxbrew
View fix-homebrew-npm.md

Fixing npm On Mac OS X for Homebrew Users

Installing node through Homebrew can cause problems with npm for globally installed packages. To fix it quickly, use the solution below. An explanation is also included at the end of this document.

Solution

This solution fixes the error caused by trying to run npm update npm -g. Once you're finished, you also won't need to use sudo to install npm modules globally.

Before you start, make a note of any globally installed npm packages. These instructions will have you remove all of those packages. After you're finished you'll need to re-install them.

You can’t perform that action at this time.