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Changing the world

Chris Williams voodootikigod

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Changing the world
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voodootikigod / google-aiml-montauk.ipynb
Last active Sep 27, 2018
Google AI/ML White Glove
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View google-aiml-backstage.ipynb
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View notary.sh
#!/bin/bash
die () {
echo >&2 "$@"
exit 1
}
[ "$#" -eq 1 ] || die "You must provide the DTR FQDN as an argument, $# provided"
export DTR_HOST=$1
View keybase.md

Keybase proof

I hereby claim:

  • I am voodootikigod on github.
  • I am voodootikigod (https://keybase.io/voodootikigod) on keybase.
  • I have a public key whose fingerprint is DDB4 F094 EFDF A388 4B8B B87F 7A53 D234 A9AB 4F9E

To claim this, I am signing this object:

@voodootikigod
voodootikigod / matuzak.md
Created Jun 22, 2015
JSConf US 2015 Track A Transcript for Michael Matuzak: Amazing Things One Can Do With JS and the NES
View matuzak.md

Hi, everybody! So let's have some fun with the Nintendo, which was a fine piece of hardware. Even today. So what is this thing that I'm going to be talking about, I guess? It's the latest in 1980s music technology. This is controlling an Nintendo's sound. Like, the sound stuff that makes the... Sound stuff that is in the microprocessor, like... Compiling down to the assembler through JavaScript. So this piece of hardware right here is what we're going to be running everything on. And there's no trickery involved or whatever. It's actual Nintendo programs running. Just want to make -- some people are like -- hey, you have some crazy thing. But no, it's real. So when I first started this project, the goal was to make it

@voodootikigod
voodootikigod / ihsanullah.md
Created Jun 22, 2015
JSConf US 2015 Track A Transcript for Naveed Ihsanullah: Parallelism experiments in JavaScript
View ihsanullah.md

That was a very kind introduction. Thank you very much. So how is everyone doing at JSConf? I heard I have no competition at the beach. Everyone is here. Full house. Thank you for coming by. So yeah. Like I said, I want to talk to you about concurrency and parallelism in JavaScript. Maybe a brief introduction is warranted. I do lead the JS team, and for the last several years, we've been thinking about this, these problems in JavaScript, and how we can address that. I would like to share some of the ways we've come around to improving concurrency and parallelism in JS. But before we... The string is a little tight. Before we go down that road, let's actually talk about some definitions. Concurrency and parallelism often come

@voodootikigod
voodootikigod / swain.md
Created Jun 22, 2015
JSConf US 2015 Track A Transcript for Simon Swain: Cold War
View swain.md

JavaScript brothers and sisters! Come on! JavaScript brothers and sisters! Yeah! Growing up as a teenager in the '80s wasn't all it's cracked up to be. Sure... We had the video game boom. The home computing revolution, and the last decade in which pop music was still truly cool. But we had zero fashion sense. None of the music had any bass. And everything was in 4x3. Worst of all, though... We grew up through the peak of the Cold War. Under the shadow of nuclear oblivion. The stuff of teenage nightmares. For an entire generation. But we made it through. And generation X emerged with a pretty extreme sense of gallows humor along the way. In the '80s, if you were nerdy enough, and lucky enough to even have a modem,

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voodootikigod / kosaka.md
Created Jun 22, 2015
JSConf US 2015 Track A Transcript for Mariko Kosaka: Knitting for Javascripters
View kosaka.md

Is that working? Great. Hi! I'm super excited to be here and speaking at JSConf. My name is Mariko. That's my Twitter handle. I should be automatically tweeting this slide, linked to this slide, so if you're in the back and you want to see that, you can find it there. I will be joining a company called (inaudible) next week, which -- I'm super excited about that. But today I'm not going to talk about software engineering. I'm going to talk about knitting. And just in case you're wondering, like if you are at the wrong conference, I will assure you that I will have enough math and code examples for you to be interested. Just for the guideline, I have a visual relation down on the slide. So the blue dots are indications that

@voodootikigod
voodootikigod / brown.md
Created Jun 22, 2015
JSConf US 2015 Track A Transcript for John Brown: (math == art && art == code)
View brown.md

Hello. Oh, there we go. Hi, everybody. I'm going to refresh this real quick. Going to go back to my title slide. This is actually really great, because it's a little bit of glitch art right in the middle of my presentation that's completely unplanned. I love it. So here's the agenda. Here's what we're going to talk about. I also have a lot of cords up here. I'm going to talk to you guys about math, art, and code. And one of those things may not seem like the others, but hopefully by the end of this talk you'll understand where I'm coming from with this weird transitive property equation. If you think about color palettes -- math == art is pretty great. There's a lot of math inside of art and a lot of math made of art.

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