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M.Yasoob Ullah Khalid ☺ yasoob

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View easy_mac.py
'''
Easy Mac
Copyright (2015) Sean Beck
Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International
See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/
Easily change your MAC address on Linux using `ifconfig`
'''
#!/usr/bin/python2.7
View bounty.txt
GitHub RCE by Environment variable injection Bug Bounty writeup
Disclaimer: I'll keep this really short but I hope you'll get the key points.
GitHub blogged a while ago about some internal tool called gerve:
https://github.com/blog/530-how-we-made-github-fast
Upon git+sshing to github.com gerve basically looks up your permission
on the repo you want to interact with. Then it bounces you further in
another forced SSH session to the back end where the repo actually is.
View top_wikipedia_articles_by_editors.py
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup, element
import urllib2, re
# Read the HTML from the webpage on Wikipedia stats and convert to soup
soup = BeautifulSoup(urllib2.urlopen('http://stats.wikimedia.org/EN/TablesWikipediaEN.htm').read())
# Look for all the paragraphs with 2014
_p = soup.findAll('b',text=re.compile('2014'))
@dannguyen
dannguyen / selenium-screenshotting.md
Last active Aug 31, 2021
Using Selenium and Python to screenshot a javascript-heavy page
View selenium-screenshotting.md

Using Selenium and Python to screenshot a javascript-heavy page

As websites become more JavaScript heavy, it's harder to automate things like screenshotting for archival purposes. I've seen examples and suggestions to use PhantomJS for visual testing/archiving of websites, but have run into issues such as the non-rendering of webfonts. I've never tried out Selenium until today...and while I'm not thinking about performance implications yet, Selenium seems far more accurate than PhantomJS...which makes sense since it actually opens a real browser. And it's not too hard to script to do complex interactions: here's an [example of how to log in to Twitter, write a tweet, upload an image, and send a tweet via Selenium and DOM element selection](https://gist.github.com/dannguyen/8a6fa49253c1d6a0eb92

@manojpandey
manojpandey / gotchas.md
Last active Aug 31, 2021
Attack of Pythons
View gotchas.md

Attack of Pythons

Among computer programmers, a “gotcha” has become a term for a feature of a programming language that is likely to play tricks on you to display behavior that is different than what you expect.

Just as a fly or a mosquito can “bite” you, we say that a gotcha can “bite” you. So, let's proceed to examine some of Python's gotchas !

alt text


View gist:e22e50cd52b7dffcf5a4db2b8ea4cce0

To the members of the MIT community:

We are writing to inform you of plans to upgrade the MIT campus network, and in particular to upgrade MIT to the next generation of Internet addressing. (Please note that no action is required on your part.)

Machines on the Internet are identified by addresses. The current addressing scheme, called IPv4, was specified around 1980, and allowed for about 4 billion addresses. That seemed enough at the time, which was before local area networks, personal computers and the like, but the Internet research community recognized around 1990 that this supply of addresses was inadequate, and put in place a plan to replace the IPv4 addresses with a new address format, called IPv6. IPv6 uses a 128-bit address scheme and is capable of 340 undecillion addresses (340 times 10^36, or 340 trillion trillion trillion possible IP addresses). This stock of addresses allows great flexibility in how addresses are assigned to hosts, for example allowing every host to use a range of addresses to

@kracekumar
kracekumar / Writing better python code.md
Last active Oct 27, 2021
Talk I gave at June bangpypers meetup.
View Writing better python code.md

Writing better python code


Swapping variables

Bad code

@likethesky
likethesky / elixirphoenix.bash
Last active Jan 5, 2022
Installing Elixir & the Phoenix framework with Homebrew on OS X
View elixirphoenix.bash
$ brew update && brew doctor # Repeat, until you've done *all* the Dr. has ordered!
$ brew install postgresql # You'll need postgres to do this... you may also need to 'initdb' as well. Google it.
$ brew install elixir
$ mix local.hex # Answer y to any Qs
$ createuser -d postgres # create the default 'postgres' user that Chris McCord seems to like -- I don't create mine w/a pw...
# Use the latest Phoenix from here: http://www.phoenixframework.org/docs/installation -- currently this is 1.0.3
# ** Answer y to any Qs **
$ mix archive.install https://github.com/phoenixframework/phoenix/releases/download/v1.0.3/phoenix_new-1.0.3.ez
@JosefJezek
JosefJezek / how-to-use-pelican.md
Last active Apr 5, 2022
How to use Pelican on GitHub Pages
View how-to-use-pelican.md
@takeshixx
takeshixx / hb-test.py
Last active Jun 9, 2022
OpenSSL heartbeat PoC with STARTTLS support.
View hb-test.py
#!/usr/bin/env python2
"""
Author: takeshix <takeshix@adversec.com>
PoC code for CVE-2014-0160. Original PoC by Jared Stafford (jspenguin@jspenguin.org).
Supportes all versions of TLS and has STARTTLS support for SMTP,POP3,IMAP,FTP and XMPP.
"""
import sys,struct,socket
from argparse import ArgumentParser