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@j127
j127 / auth_controller.rb
Last active Sep 6, 2019
Rails 5.2 with Discourse SSO Authentication
View auth_controller.rb
# This is just a sketch. Please leave a comment if you have suggestions.
class AuthController < ApplicationController
# Generate and SSO URL and redirect the user to Discourse
def authenticate
# Save the ?destination=some_url parameter if it exists
destination = request.query_parameters['destination'] || root_url
session[:destination] = destination
# `nonce` here will have `:value` and `:created_at` keys
nonce = generate_nonce
@drmalex07
drmalex07 / README-oneshot-systemd-service.md
Last active Oct 1, 2019
An example with an oneshot service on systemd. #systemd #systemd.service #oneshot
View README-oneshot-systemd-service.md

README

Services declared as oneshot are expected to take some action and exit immediatelly (thus, they are not really services, no running processes remain). A common pattern for these type of service is to be defined by a setup and a teardown action.

Let's create a example foo service that when started creates a file, and when stopped it deletes it.

Define setup/teardown actions

Create executable file /opt/foo/setup-foo.sh:

@Chaser324
Chaser324 / GitHub-Forking.md
Last active Oct 18, 2019
GitHub Standard Fork & Pull Request Workflow
View GitHub-Forking.md

Whether you're trying to give back to the open source community or collaborating on your own projects, knowing how to properly fork and generate pull requests is essential. Unfortunately, it's quite easy to make mistakes or not know what you should do when you're initially learning the process. I know that I certainly had considerable initial trouble with it, and I found a lot of the information on GitHub and around the internet to be rather piecemeal and incomplete - part of the process described here, another there, common hangups in a different place, and so on.

In an attempt to coallate this information for myself and others, this short tutorial is what I've found to be fairly standard procedure for creating a fork, doing your work, issuing a pull request, and merging that pull request back into the original project.

Creating a Fork

Just head over to the GitHub page and click the "Fork" button. It's just that simple. Once you've done that, you can use your favorite git client to clone your repo or j

@shunchu
shunchu / convert-seconds-into-hh-mm-ss-in-ruby.rb
Created Jul 25, 2012
Convert seconds into HH:MM:SS in Ruby
View convert-seconds-into-hh-mm-ss-in-ruby.rb
t = 236 # seconds
Time.at(t).utc.strftime("%H:%M:%S")
=> "00:03:56"
# Reference
# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3963930/ruby-rails-how-to-convert-seconds-to-time
@perky
perky / ProFi.lua
Created May 30, 2012
ProFi, a simple lua profiler that works with LuaJIT and prints a pretty report file in columns.
View ProFi.lua
--[[
ProFi v1.3, by Luke Perkin 2012. MIT Licence http://www.opensource.org/licenses/mit-license.php.
Example:
ProFi = require 'ProFi'
ProFi:start()
some_function()
another_function()
coroutine.resume( some_coroutine )
ProFi:stop()
@gre
gre / easing.js
Last active Oct 18, 2019
Simple Easing Functions in Javascript - see https://github.com/gre/bezier-easing
View easing.js
/*
* Easing Functions - inspired from http://gizma.com/easing/
* only considering the t value for the range [0, 1] => [0, 1]
*/
EasingFunctions = {
// no easing, no acceleration
linear: function (t) { return t },
// accelerating from zero velocity
easeInQuad: function (t) { return t*t },
// decelerating to zero velocity
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