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Reset for HTML4 / HTML5
/* `XHTML, HTML4, HTML5 Reset
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
a,
abbr,
acronym,
address,
applet,
article,
aside,
audio,
b,
big,
blockquote,
body,
canvas,
caption,
center,
cite,
code,
dd,
del,
details,
dfn,
dialog,
div,
dl,
dt,
em,
embed,
fieldset,
figcaption,
figure,
font,
footer,
form,
h1,
h2,
h3,
h4,
h5,
h6,
header,
hgroup,
hr,
html,
i,
iframe,
img,
ins,
kbd,
label,
legend,
li,
mark,
menu,
meter,
nav,
object,
ol,
output,
p,
pre,
progress,
q,
rp,
rt,
ruby,
s,
samp,
section,
small,
span,
strike,
strong,
sub,
summary,
sup,
table,
tbody,
td,
tfoot,
th,
thead,
time,
tr,
tt,
u,
ul,
var,
video,
xmp {
border: 0;
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
font-size: 100%;
}
html,
body {
height: 100%;
}
article,
aside,
details,
figcaption,
figure,
footer,
header,
hgroup,
menu,
nav,
section {
/*
Override the default (display: inline) for
browsers that do not recognize HTML5 tags.
IE8 (and lower) requires a shiv:
http://ejohn.org/blog/html5-shiv
*/
display: block;
}
b,
strong {
/*
Makes browsers agree.
IE + Opera = font-weight: bold.
Gecko + WebKit = font-weight: bolder.
*/
font-weight: bold;
}
img {
font-size: 0;
vertical-align: middle;
/*
For IE.
http://css-tricks.com/ie-fix-bicubic-scaling-for-images
*/
-ms-interpolation-mode: bicubic;
}
li {
/*
For IE6 + IE7.
*/
display: list-item;
}
table {
border-collapse: collapse;
border-spacing: 0;
}
th,
td,
caption {
font-weight: normal;
vertical-align: top;
text-align: left;
}
svg {
/*
For IE9.
*/
overflow: hidden;
}
@paulirish

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@paulirish paulirish commented Sep 17, 2010

you shouldn't give border:0 to the a tag. kills keyboard navigability.

@nathansmith

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@nathansmith nathansmith commented Sep 17, 2010

Actually...
It's "outline:0" that kills [a] tag navigation.
But, point taken. And removed.

@dajare

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@dajare dajare commented Dec 13, 2010

Came here from your tweet, Nathan.

Have you slapped a license of any kind on this? Or even a "public domain", etc.?

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@nathansmith nathansmith commented Dec 13, 2010

@dajare -- It's free to do whatever you want with. I'll probably include it with 960 soon-ish, so it'll be dual MIT / GPL licensed.

@chriseppstein

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@chriseppstein chriseppstein commented Jan 24, 2011

@nathansmith - there's no point to a dual MIT/GPL license. MIT by itself is enough, derivative works are allowed to be GPL licensed.

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@paulirish paulirish commented Jan 24, 2011

IIRC its the drupal community that doesnt seem to agree with this. They are the reason jQuery is MIT/GPL.

from what i can tell drupal is wrong, and chris is correct. but... yeah...

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@nathansmith nathansmith commented Jan 24, 2011

@chris -- Yeah, that's why I made 960 both MIT + GPL, so that it could be used in Drupal themes. And Paul's right, that's why jQuery (which was initially MIT only) went dual MIT + GPL, to be more explicit for inclusion in GPL'd projects -- namely Drupal.

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@chriseppstein chriseppstein commented Jan 24, 2011

Fucking licenses. How do they work?

@nathansmith

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@nathansmith nathansmith commented Jan 24, 2011

MIT = Use for whatever you want, commercial or otherwise -- just give credit.

GPL = Anything you release as a derivative work must also be free, and GPL.

Under a dual license, someone can use the work as "MIT" and not have to abide by GPL's re-release stipulations. GPL is nice because it forces open source to stay as such, but it's a "poison pill" if derivative works are included in a larger commercial product, as technically it GPL's the whole thing.

At least, that's my non-lawyerly take on it how things work.

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