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@Blackshawk
Blackshawk / blog - Explaining My Choices Further.md
Last active Mar 5, 2017
In which I do a little digging about the choices I've made with PHP. This is a long read, but it isn't something that can be explained in one or two paragraphs.
View blog - Explaining My Choices Further.md

In the comments from my last post and on Twitter I noticed a lot of people who had something to say about PHP. The comments were varied but they usally sounded something like this (sorry @ipetepete, I picked yours because it was the shortest).

...the little bits of soul from all of us who've had to work on, and or maintain large PHP applications. – ipetepete

In Pete's defense, he did go on to say that rest of the stack I was using was a "smorgasbord of awesome". Thanks, Pete. I agree!

I would, however, like to take a little time to correct a misperception in the developer community about PHP. I recently got into this same... discussion... with Jeff Atwood, and I seem to be running into it more and more. So here goes. Please bear with me as I cover a little history further on.

Pete, and everybody else, _you're exactly rig

@nikic
nikic / objects_arrays.md
Last active Nov 3, 2019
Post explaining why objects often use less memory than arrays (in PHP)
View objects_arrays.md

Why objects (usually) use less memory than arrays in PHP

This is just a small post in response to [this tweet][tweet] by Julien Pauli (who by the way is the release manager for PHP 5.5). In the tweet he claims that objects use more memory than arrays in PHP. Even though it can be like that, it's not true in most cases. (Note: This only applies to PHP 5.4 or newer.)

The reason why it's easy to assume that objects are larger than arrays is because objects can be seen as an array of properties and a bit of additional information (like the class it belongs to). And as array + additional info > array it obviously follows that objects are larger. The thing is that in most cases PHP can optimize the array part of it away. So how does that work?

The key here is that objects usually have a predefined set of keys, whereas arrays don't:

@igorw
igorw / gist:4475804
Last active Oct 4, 2019
Composer Versioning
@jsor
jsor / Connection.php
Last active Apr 27, 2018
Async MySQL Client
View Connection.php
<?php
namespace Jsor\MysqlAsync;
use React\EventLoop\LoopInterface;
use React\Promise\Deferred;
class Connection
{
private $loop;
@ziadoz
ziadoz / awesome-php.md
Last active Nov 5, 2019
Awesome PHP — A curated list of amazingly awesome PHP libraries, resources and shiny things.
View awesome-php.md
@loonies
loonies / 1_phpunit-api.md
Last active Nov 11, 2019
PHPUnit Cheat Sheet
View 1_phpunit-api.md

PHPUnit API reference

  • version 3.6

TODO

Check those constraints:

$this->anything()
View git-track
#!/bin/sh
branch=$(git branch 2>/dev/null | grep ^\*)
[ x$1 != x ] && tracking=$1 || tracking=${branch/* /}
git config branch.$tracking.remote origin
git config branch.$tracking.merge refs/heads/$tracking
echo "tracking origin/$tracking"
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