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  • INGI, UCLouvain
  • Belgium
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@mnot
mnot / http.rrtext
Last active Jan 30, 2019
Railroad diagrams of HTTP semantics
View http.rrtext
# Generated from the ABNF at <https://httpwg.org/http-core/draft-ietf-httpbis-semantics-latest.html#collected.abnf>
# using <https://github.com/katef/kgt>
Accept:
,---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------.
| |
||--^--v----------------- "," ------------------>--v------------------------------------------------------------------------->-->--||
| | | |
| ,-------------------. | | ,-----------------------------------------------. |
| | | | | | | |
@srijanshetty
srijanshetty / package-vagrant-box.md
Last active Mar 10, 2019
Clean up a vagrant box before packaging
View package-vagrant-box.md

We’re now going to clean up disk space on the VM so when we package it into a new Vagrant box, it’s as clean as possible. First, remove APT cache

$ sudo apt-get clean

Then, “zero out” the drive (this is for Ubuntu):

$ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/EMPTY bs=1M
@austinhappel
austinhappel / how-to-connect-an-iOS-device-to-your-computer-using-SOCKS.md
Last active Mar 21, 2019
How to connect an iOS device to your computer via a SOCKS proxy. Say you're running a virtual machine on your work computer. Say this machine, for whatever reason, can only connect to the internet over NAT - as in, it does not get it's own IP address. Say this VM is running a webserver, and you need a device outside of your computer to connect t…
View how-to-connect-an-iOS-device-to-your-computer-using-SOCKS.md

How to connect an iOS device to your computer via a SOCKS proxy

Say you're running a virtual machine on your work computer. Say this machine, for whatever reason, can only connect to the internet over NAT - as in, it does not get it's own IP address. Say this VM is running a webserver, and you need a device outside of your computer to connect to it.

If only there was a way to get your work computer to 'share' it's network, so that you could get at that VM… Here's how you do it!

For all instructions, I assume your work computer is a mac

  1. Get your computer's IP address:
@jellybeansoup
jellybeansoup / cltools.sh
Last active Dec 31, 2018
Install Autoconf and Automake on OS X Mountain Lion
View cltools.sh
#!/bin/sh
##
# Install autoconf, automake and libtool smoothly on Mac OS X.
# Newer versions of these libraries are available and may work better on OS X
#
# This script is originally from http://jsdelfino.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/autoconf-and-automake-on-mac-os-x.html
#
export build=~/devtools # or wherever you'd like to build
@adrienbrault
adrienbrault / purge.sh
Created Sep 24, 2012
Script to reduce VM size before packaging for vagrant
View purge.sh
#!/bin/sh
# Credits to:
# - http://vstone.eu/reducing-vagrant-box-size/
# - https://github.com/mitchellh/vagrant/issues/343
aptitude -y purge ri
aptitude -y purge installation-report landscape-common wireless-tools wpasupplicant ubuntu-serverguide
aptitude -y purge python-dbus libnl1 python-smartpm python-twisted-core libiw30
aptitude -y purge python-twisted-bin libdbus-glib-1-2 python-pexpect python-pycurl python-serial python-gobject python-pam python-openssl libffi5
@hellerbarde
hellerbarde / latency.markdown
Created May 31, 2012 — forked from jboner/latency.txt
Latency numbers every programmer should know
View latency.markdown

Latency numbers every programmer should know

L1 cache reference ......................... 0.5 ns
Branch mispredict ............................ 5 ns
L2 cache reference ........................... 7 ns
Mutex lock/unlock ........................... 25 ns
Main memory reference ...................... 100 ns             
Compress 1K bytes with Zippy ............. 3,000 ns  =   3 µs
Send 2K bytes over 1 Gbps network ....... 20,000 ns  =  20 µs
SSD random read ........................ 150,000 ns  = 150 µs
Read 1 MB sequentially from memory ..... 250,000 ns  = 250 µs
@dupuy
dupuy / README.rst
Last active Sep 2, 2019
Common markup for Markdown and reStructuredText
View README.rst

Markdown and reStructuredText

GitHub supports several lightweight markup languages for documentation; the most popular ones (generally, not just at GitHub) are Markdown and reStructuredText. Markdown is sometimes considered easier to use, and is often preferred when the purpose is simply to generate HTML. On the other hand, reStructuredText is more extensible and powerful, with native support (not just embedded HTML) for tables, as well as things like automatic generation of tables of contents.

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