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Daniel Dunbar ddunbar

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#!/usr/bin/awk -f
# This program is a copy of guff, a plot device. https://github.com/silentbicycle/guff
# My copy here is written in awk instead of C, has no compelling benefit.
# Public domain. @thingskatedid
# Run as awk -v x=xyz ... or env variables for stuff?
# Assumptions: the data is evenly spaced along the x-axis
# TODO: moving average
@danieldunbar
danieldunbar / gist:99e27aac7370f02f4e2e8fd71e27e92b
Last active Apr 13, 2020
Daniel Dunbar Resume (Markdown)
View gist:99e27aac7370f02f4e2e8fd71e27e92b

DANIEL DUNBAR

Resume Android App

Education

  • University of Arizona
    Bachelor of Science: Computer Science
@jashkenas
jashkenas / semantic-pedantic.md
Last active Nov 18, 2020
Why Semantic Versioning Isn't
View semantic-pedantic.md

Spurred by recent events (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8244700), this is a quick set of jotted-down thoughts about the state of "Semantic" Versioning, and why we should be fighting the good fight against it.

For a long time in the history of software, version numbers indicated the relative progress and change in a given piece of software. A major release (1.x.x) was major, a minor release (x.1.x) was minor, and a patch release was just a small patch. You could evaluate a given piece of software by name + version, and get a feeling for how far away version 2.0.1 was from version 2.8.0.

But Semantic Versioning (henceforth, SemVer), as specified at http://semver.org/, changes this to prioritize a mechanistic understanding of a codebase over a human one. Any "breaking" change to the software must be accompanied with a new major version number. It's alright for robots, but bad for us.

SemVer tries to compress a huge amount of information — the nature of the change, the percentage of users that wil

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